Results

Search Results for: term & Conditions

Terms and Conditions

Booking Procedure

A booking application is made by filling in the online booking form, or by submitting an email or faxed copy. The customer must ensure that his/her correct and complete contact details are supplied on the application form. By submitting a signed email or faxed application, or by completing an online application form, the applicant indicates that he/she has read and understood and accepted these terms and conditions.

A sales consultant will contact the applicant to discuss and confirm the course details and at that time a provisional booking shall be made and a quotation for the relevant course(s) issued. Payment of the course fee is required to confirm a booking. The quotation or invoice document will contain BOTIs’ banking details as published on our website.

Payment Terms

The booking is confirmed once proof of payment is received by either fax or email. The payment reference must contain the relevant quote or invoice number eg. 6879.

Terms for corporate/government clients may be arranged by negotiation with an authorised representative from each company, and under exceptional circumstances, in which case an official purchase order must be presented prior to the course(s). A purchase order must be considered a commitment by the customer or company to purchase a place(s) on a particular course(s) at a particular time as quoted or invoiced by Business Optimization Training Institute, and therefore any cancellation or postponement of such place(s) on a course(s) will be subject to the relevant penalties and the purchase order remains valid and due for payment. Business Optimization Training Institute reserves the right to charge interest, levied at the prime lending rate of FNB, on all outstanding accounts.

Cancellations

Notification of cancellation of a booking must be received in writing by fax or email. The following sliding scale applies to cancellations received less than ten working days before the scheduled start of the course.

Notice Period Fee Forfeited
10-6 working days 30% unless put towards another course
5-3 working Days 50.00%
3 working days or less 100.00%

Delegates who fail to arrive on the day of the course, will be responsible for the full course fees. A delegate may send an alternative in their stead, as long as the alternative is a suitable training candidate who fulfills all of the course prerequisites.

Business Optimization Training Institute reserves the right to reschedule or cancel a course that fails to attract sufficient delegates. Business Optimization Training Institute furthermore reserves the right to change the venue of any course at its discretion. In either case, the delegate will be advised at least two working days in advance via email and/or telephonically.

Repeating Courses

Delegates may request to repeat a course at a reduced rate of 50% of the published course fee. Such delegates will be placed on a standby list and will be notified of course availability within five working days of commencement of the course. The reduced course rate will cover lunch and refreshments but will not cover any manuals or course materials. The delegate may bring his/her original manual along where this is relevant. In the event of the delegate needing a new manual, an additional fee will be charged. The responsibility lies with the delegate to confirm at least 3 working days before the start of the repeated course, that he/she has the relevant manual.

Assessment

All course fees do not include assessment. Where applicable, assessment may be separately purchased.

Certificate of Attendance

A Certificate of Attendance will be issue to all delegates who complete a course. Incomplete attendance will result in the forfeiture of the attendance certificate.

Training Times

Registration takes place from 8:00 a.m. on the first day of the course. Delegates must sign the Attendance Register in reception each morning on arrival. Business Optimization Training Institute takes no responsibility for ensuring the attendance of delegates. Training takes place between 8:30 a.m. and 04:30 p.m. daily, unless alternate arrangements have been agreed to. Delegates need to consider traffic congestion on main roads and routes to ensure that they arrive on time. Should delegates need help locating accommodation nearby, Business Optimization Training Institute will be happy to assist with a list of reputable guest houses in the vicinity.

General Conduct

Business Optimization Training Institute trusts that delegates will conduct themselves in a respectful and orderly and safe manner at all times while on our premises, and reserves the right to exclude delegates who cause a disturbance or who fail to comply with rules relating to the building or to public safety. We also request that cellular phones be switched off during training to reduce disturbances. Our venue is a non-smoking venue. Delegates may smoke outside in the garden provided that they comply with the current smoking laws of the South Africa.

Disclaimer

Delegates attending the course acknowledge that Business Optimization Training Institute is not liable for loss of or damage to any person(s) and/or property, whether or not such loss and/or damage has been caused by any negligence of Business Optimization Training Institute and/or its employees and/or its agents and/or its partners or not. In the event of Business Optimization Training Institute being found liable, damages will not exceed monies paid to Business Optimization Training Institute by the delegate for the course attended. No action or relaxation of any of these terms by BOTI will constitute a general waiver of these terms and conditions.

Terms and Conditions

Booking Procedure

A booking application is made by filling in the online booking form, or by submitting an email or faxed copy. The customer must ensure that his/her correct and complete contact details are supplied on the application form. By submitting a signed email or faxed application, or by completing an online application form, the applicant indicates that he/she has read and understood and accepted these terms and conditions.

A sales consultant will contact the applicant to discuss and confirm the course details and at that time a provisional booking shall be made and a quotation for the relevant course(s) issued. Payment of the course fee is required to confirm a booking. The quotation or invoice document will contain BOTIs’ banking details as published on our website.

Payment Terms

The booking is confirmed once proof of payment is received by either fax or email. The payment reference must contain the relevant quote or invoice number eg. 6879.

Terms for corporate/government clients may be arranged by negotiation with an authorised representative from each company, and under exceptional circumstances, in which case an official purchase order must be presented prior to the course(s). A purchase order must be considered a commitment by the customer or company to purchase a place(s) on a particular course(s) at a particular time as quoted or invoiced by Business Optimization Training Institute, and therefore any cancellation or postponement of such place(s) on a course(s) will be subject to the relevant penalties and the purchase order remains valid and due for payment. Business Optimization Training Institute reserves the right to charge interest, levied at the prime lending rate of FNB, on all outstanding accounts.

Cancellations

Notification of cancellation of a booking must be received in writing by fax or email. The following sliding scale applies to cancellations received less than ten working days before the scheduled start of the course.

Notice Period Fee Forfeited
10-6 working days 30% unless put towards another course
5-3 working Days 50.00%
3 working days or less 100.00%

Delegates who fail to arrive on the day of the course, will be responsible for the full course fees. A delegate may send an alternative in their stead, as long as the alternative is a suitable training candidate who fulfills all of the course prerequisites.

Business Optimization Training Institute reserves the right to reschedule or cancel a course that fails to attract sufficient delegates. Business Optimization Training Institute furthermore reserves the right to change the venue of any course at its discretion. In either case, the delegate will be advised at least two working days in advance via email and/or telephonically.

Repeating Courses

Delegates may request to repeat a course at a reduced rate of 50% of the published course fee. Such delegates will be placed on a standby list and will be notified of course availability within five working days of commencement of the course. The reduced course rate will cover lunch and refreshments but will not cover any manuals or course materials. The delegate may bring his/her original manual along where this is relevant. In the event of the delegate needing a new manual, an additional fee will be charged. The responsibility lies with the delegate to confirm at least 3 working days before the start of the repeated course, that he/she has the relevant manual.

Assessment

All course fees do not include assessment. Where applicable, assessment may be separately purchased.

Certificate of Attendance

A Certificate of Attendance will be issue to all delegates who complete a course. Incomplete attendance will result in the forfeiture of the attendance certificate.

Training Times

Registration takes place from 8:00 a.m. on the first day of the course. Delegates must sign the Attendance Register in reception each morning on arrival. Business Optimization Training Institute takes no responsibility for ensuring the attendance of delegates. Training takes place between 8:30 a.m. and 04:30 p.m. daily, unless alternate arrangements have been agreed to. Delegates need to consider traffic congestion on main roads and routes to ensure that they arrive on time. Should delegates need help locating accommodation nearby, Business Optimization Training Institute will be happy to assist with a list of reputable guest houses in the vicinity.

General Conduct

Business Optimization Training Institute trusts that delegates will conduct themselves in a respectful and orderly and safe manner at all times while on our premises, and reserves the right to exclude delegates who cause a disturbance or who fail to comply with rules relating to the building or to public safety. We also request that cellular phones be switched off during training to reduce disturbances. Our venue is a non-smoking venue. Delegates may smoke outside in the garden provided that they comply with the current smoking laws of the South Africa.

Disclaimer

Delegates attending the course acknowledge that Business Optimization Training Institute is not liable for loss of or damage to any person(s) and/or property, whether or not such loss and/or damage has been caused by any negligence of Business Optimization Training Institute and/or its employees and/or its agents and/or its partners or not. In the event of Business Optimization Training Institute being found liable, damages will not exceed monies paid to Business Optimization Training Institute by the delegate for the course attended. No action or relaxation of any of these terms by BOTI will constitute a general waiver of these terms and conditions.

Effectively Manage Human Resources & Labour Relations

Effectively Manage Human Resources & Labour Relations

In dealing with managing the human element of the business, one needs to be able to analyse policy, procedures, agreements and conditions of employment that are applicable in the workplace and take on the mantle of responsibility to optimize and maintain efficiencies surrounding these policies.

This comprehensive course covers a number of important aspects involved with labour relations.  You will learn how to participate in the implementation of applicable labour legislation, draft job descriptions, recruit staff, set up selection panels and draft employment contracts.  You will also learn how to set up performance evaluation committees and manage the performance evaluation process as well as being taken through a step by step process involving the development, facilitation and monitoring of disciplinary policies, processes and procedures.

Get up to speed on the workings of Labour law and enrol now for BOTI’s Effectively Manage Human Resources & Labour Relations course.  BOTI offers management and leadership courses, leadership training and management training.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

Course duration

3 days

Get up to speed on the workings of Labour law and learn how to:

  • Develop and maintain effective human resource policies and procedures.
  • Participate in the implementation of applicable labour legislation.
  • Develop, facilitate and monitor disciplinary policy, process and procedures.
  • Institute performance evaluation committees and manage the performance evaluation process.
  • Institute facilitation of disciplinary policies, actions and hearings.
  • Draft job descriptions.
  • Handle recruitment.
  • Set up selection panels
  • Draft employment contracts.

Get up to speed on the workings of Labour law and enrol now for BOTI’s Effectively Manage Human Resources & Labour Relations course.  BOTI offers management and leadership courses, leadership training and management training.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

Benefits of attending:  Effectively Manage Human Resources & Labour Relations course

Upon successful completion of this course you will be up to speed on the workings of Labour Law and proficient in the following areas:

  • Include policy and procedures on employment equity, skills development, grievance procedures, performance evaluation, remuneration negotiations, disciplinary hearings etc. in the development and maintenance of effective human recourse policies and practices.
  • Handle the recruitment process in the drafting of job descriptions, holding selection panels and drafting employment contracts.
  • Apply the terms and conditions of employment including start date and probation period, duration of employment, remuneration, notice period, leave including sick leave, family responsibility leave, maternity leave and annual and vacation leave; hours of work and overtime, other benefits and deductions.
  • Handle organizational disciplinary policy, procedures and disciplinary code of conduct and instituting and facilitation of disciplinary policies actions and hearings.
  • Taking into account performance evaluation policy and procedures, performance evaluation moderating committees and feedback, institute and manage the performance evaluation process.
  • Implement applicable labour legislation terms of the Employment Equity Act, BCEA, LRA, SDA, SDL, OHSACT and COIDA.

Get up to speed on the workings of Labour law and enrol now for BOTI’s Effectively Manage Human Resources & Labour Relations course.  BOTI offers management and leadership courses, leadership training and management training.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

Who is this course suitable for?

This course is aimed at supervisors, team leaders and managers who manage a team of people and who wish to improve their human resources management skills.

Testimonials from similar courses

M Niemand – Golden Pond 621 (Pty) Ltd – T/A Radisson Blu le Vendome

‘I learned a lot.  The trainer’s entire presentation was awesome.’

This Unit Standard course is aligned to Unit Standard 116394:  Implement and manage human resource and labour relations policies and acts

Public Course Schedule and Costs

Please click on link below for related public course/s:
There are no upcoming events at this time. You might also enjoy:  Finance for Non Finance Managers

Professional presentations course

Master Effective Business Communication & Presentation Skills

Get up to speed on the workings of Labour law and enrol now for BOTI’s Effectively Manage Human Resources & Labour Relations course.  BOTI offers management and leadership courses, leadership training and management training.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

 

Governance & Efficiency in Tendering and Supply Chain Management Course

Governance & Efficiency in Tendering and Supply Chain Management

The issuing of tenders for products and services encourages excellent rates and fairness and for any entity releasing them. The procedures can, nevertheless be intricate and comprehensive. We also need to understand how to enhance the Supply Chain Process so that we can minimize supply chain costs. To help you to enhance your tender procedures, we are running a series of courses entitled: “Top Governance in Tendering Process and Supply Chain Management”.

Benefits: Governance & Efficiency in Tendering and Supply Chain  Management

Some of the benefits of attending this course include:

  • Understand the bidding procedure from start to end.
  • Enhanced understanding of Supply Chain Management.
  • Allows you to plainly specify the tender requirements.
  • Develop a qualified assessment group of staff with all the skills to pick the most appropriate bidder.
  • Recognize the essential tender assessment criteria.
  • Be proficient in award tenders to qualified, high value providers that meet your organizational requirements.

Course Outline: Governance & Efficiency in Tendering and Supply Chain Management

Days 1-2: The Tendering Process

South African Government Laws (procedures) and Context

  • The PFMA and tendering.
  • Comprehending why organisations tender and exactly what they want to accomplish.
  • Terms and conditions of tendering.
  • Local Content requirements.
  • Business & Supplier Development and the DTI.
  • Start-up businesses & the tender procedures.
  • B-BBEE certificates requirements.
  • RSA Constitutional Provisions for tendering.
  • Key Principles of the PPPFA guidelines Municipal Finance Management Act.
  • Objectives of Government Tendering and how it supports the 5 x Pillars of Procurement.
  • Standard requirements for government quotes.
  • Preferential Procurement Regulations.

Contractual Components

  • General concepts of law and contract & breach of contract. Agreements, company representation, legal structures for acquiring in South Africa.

Procedures and Processes

  • Knowledge of the tendering  cycle
  • Preparing the bid spec – recording your requirements plainly
  • Where and the best ways to promote tenders
  • Interaction and openness in the bidding procedures
  • The tender request notification & the tender schedule
  • Closing dates and times
  • The distinction amongst: Expressions of Interests; Asking For Proposals (RFP); Asking For Tenders (RFT).
  • The tender evaluation requirements.
  • Who should be on the tender evaluation board or committee?
  • Evaluating tender files.
  • The adjudication procedure.
    • Do’s and Don’ts when communicating with bidders.
    • Factors for disqualification.
    • Ranking of bidders.
  • Compliance evaluation.
  • Risk evaluation.
  • Tender Approvals & Tender confidentiality.
  • The 3 primary committees in the tendering procedure and their functions.
  • Prohibitions: Who is permitted to tender? Defaulters and Restricted Suppliers.
  • Who must be included the bid collection procedure.
  • Recognizing unnecessary documents & examining procedures to guarantee files are appropriately assembled.
  • SARS Tax Clearance Certificates and other compliance.
  • Know what post‐submission actions are required and are appropriate.
  • Legal post‐bid settlements.
  • Recognizing and removing scams and fraud in the bidding procedures.
  • Grievance procedures and the Public Protector.

Day 3: Enhancing Supply Chain Process

  • Why Supply Chain Management?
  • Essential Terms.
  • Levels of Supply Chain Management.
  • 5 Stages of Supply Chain Management.
  • The Flows of Supply Chain Management.
  • Inventory Management.
  • Supply Chain Groups.
  • Tracking as well as Monitoring.
  • Supply Chain Event Management.

 

Who Should Attend:Governance & Efficiency in Tendering and Supply Chain Management

  • Professionals/ technical personnel included in the management of tenders.
  • Procurement workers.
  • Project supervisors/ group leaders associated with tenders.
  • Individuals who wish to understand the tender process better in order to improve your chances of winning contracts.
  • Anybody involved in preparation or examination of tenders/ quotes.
  • Tender Committee Members

 

Upcoming Public Courses

Please click on link below for related public course/s:
There are no upcoming events at this time. Book Now! View Calendar for the latest course 

Please Phone Us Now To Speak to One of Our Friendly Consultants

Tel:011-882-8853

OR

FOR CELL PHONES CLICK TO CALL

Please Fill in the Form – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

Please Email Us Now  – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

 [email protected]

People Management: Labour Relations & Law, Employment Equity Course

People Management: Labour Relations & Law, Employment Equity

Introduction: Labour Relations and Law and Employment Equity

Understand how to best manage an organizations most important assets: its people.

This course is intended for employees of South African companies. The course sets out Labour Laws and Labour Legislation in South Africa. The course covers the current legislation and past changes to the Labour Law. Apart from discipline, it also deals with skills to manage people; including performance evaluation, recruitment and selection. At the end of the course participants will have a general overview of the laws and the Codes of Good Practice and people management.

The program has a day dedicated to employment equity training. Delegates will be able to describe transformation legislation and will understand the rights and responsibilities of employers and employees.

Course Benefits: People Management: Labour Relations & Law, Employment Equity

The advantage of attending this course include:

  • Improve the effectiveness of your work force, through proper recruitment and performance management.
  • Understand and apply Labour Laws correctly.
  • Improve relations with trade unions and individual employees.
  • Ensure that the orginization does not break any laws and regulations.
  • Understanding employment equity to comply with laws and improve your BBBEE scorecard.

Course Outline: People Management: Labour Relations & Law, Employment Equity

Day 1 & 2:Labour Law and Good Practices

  • Formulating performance standards for team members in a unit.
  • Establishing systems for monitoring performance of team members.
  • Preparing for a performance review of a team member.
  • Demonstrating an understanding of the monitoring, enforcement and legal proceedings as set out in the Basic Conditions of Employment Act.
  • Conducting performance review interviews.
  • Planning and preparing for recruitment and selection
  • Recruiting applicants.
  • Selecting staff.
  • Effectively handling hearings and reaching reasoned decisions on the basis of evidence presented.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the purpose, application of the Basic Conditions of Employment Act.
  • Describing the regulation of working time and leave as set out in the Basic Conditions of Employment Act.
  • Describing the particulars of employment, remuneration and termination of employment as set out in the Basic Conditions of Employment Act.

Day 3: Employment Equity Fundamentals

  • The History of Learning in South Africa.
  • Transformational Legislation: Linking Skills Development to Legislation; Compliance and Ethics.
  • Statutory Reporting.
  • Employment Equity: Statutory Responsibilities – Reporting and Compliance; Setting up an Employment Equity Committee; Monitor and Evaluate Implementation.
  • Construct an EE Blueprint for your Organization.
  • Reporting on the Implementation of EE.

Course Duration: People Management: Labour Relations & Law, Employment Equity

3 Days

Who should attend: People Management: Labour Relations & Law, Employment Equity:

  • CFOs, CEOs, COOs.
  • Departmental Heads.
  • Legal Practitioners.
  • This course is intended for HR managers.
  • New Managers, Middle Management, Senior/Executive Managers.
  • Anyone who needs to manage employees and labor relations.

People Management: Labour Relations & Law, Employment Equity: Course Duration

3 day/s

Upcoming Public Courses

Please click on link below for related public course/s:

Human Resources and Labour Legislation

There are no upcoming events at this time.

Please Phone Us Now To Speak to One of Our Friendly Consultants

Tel:011-882-8853

OR

FOR CELL PHONES CLICK TO CALL

Please Fill in the Form – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

Please Email Us Now  – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

 [email protected]

Labour Relations & Law Fundamentals Course

Labour Relations & Law Fundamentals Course: Introduction

This course is intended for employees of South African companies. The course sets out Labour Laws and Labour Legislation in South Africa. The course covers the current legislation and past changes to the Labour Law. At the end of the course participants will have a general overview of the laws and the Codes of Good Practice.

Labour Relations & Law Fundamentals Course :Course Outline

1. Formulating performance standards for team members in a unit.
2. Establishing systems for monitoring performance of team members.
3. Preparing for a performance review of a team member.
4. Demonstrating an understanding of the monitoring, enforcement and legal proceedings as set out in the Basic Conditions of Employment Act.
5. Conducting performance review interview.
6. Plan and prepare for recruitment and selection
7. Recruit applicants.
8. Select staff.
9. Able to effectively handle hearings and reach reasoned decisions on the basis of evidence presented.
10. Demonstrating an understanding of the purpose, application of the Basic Conditions of Employment Act.
11. Describing the regulation of working time and leave as set out in the Basic Conditions of Employment Act.
12. Describing the particulars of employment, remuneration and termination of employment as set out in the Basic Conditions of Employment Act.

Labour Relations & Law Fundamentals Course: Course Duration

3 day/s

Who should attend: Labour Relations & Law Fundamentals Course

This course is intended for shop stewards and HR personnel.

**Quote does not include Any Exam Fees (if applicable)

IMPORTANT ACTION: Do Not Wait To Improve Your Skills.  

Book Now By Completing Online Booking Form / Customised Proposal or Obtain Approval For Your Already Received Customised Proposal

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training

Course Introduction

Don’t be caught SHORT! This comprehensive course enables managers to :

  • Recruit and select people for defined positions within an organisation or the personnel recruitment industry
  • Undertake a performance review
  • Understand labour legislation
  • Deal with disciplinary hearings

The Challenge

The Human Resources funtion is key for any organization to achieve its strategic objectives. After all labour is one of the company’s most important resources and needs to be properly managed.

The Solution

Key outcomes of this course include:

  • Formulating performance standards for team members in a unit
  • Establishing systems for monitoring performance of team members
  • Preparing for a performance review of a team member
  • Conducting performance review interview
  • Planning and preparing for recruitment and selection
  • Recruiting applicants
  • Selecting staff
  • Demonstrating an understanding of the purpose, application of the Basic Conditions of Employment Act
  • Describing the regulation of working time and leave as set out in the Basic Conditions of Employment Act
  • Describing the particulars of employment, remuneration and termination of employment as set out in the Basic Conditions of Employment Act
  • Demonstrating an understanding of the monitoring, enforcement and legal proceedings as set out in the Basic Conditions of Employment Act
  • Able to to effectively handle hearings and reach reasoned decisions on the basis of evidence presented

Delivery Method

  • Two-day Instructor Led HR workshops in Johannesburg, Cape Town, Durban (South Africa) based training
  • Strong delegate participation and practical application of theory

Our objective of this course is to ensure that the acquired tools and knowledge are user friendly and easily applied in the workplace.

All delegates will receive:

  • Material, refreshments (lunch, tea),  after training assistance for 3 months (Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training Course)
  • Memory stick (with relevant tools and models that can be easily accessed when applied back at work) (Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training Course)

Upcoming Public Courses

Please click on link below for related public course/s:

Human Resources and Labour Legislation

There are no upcoming events at this time.

Customized Courses – Book or Obtain Instant Quote

We offer the HR Management Course / HR Course / HR Workshopacross the country: Anytime, Anywhere. Click on the link to get an instant proposal or book your course NOW:

Book Course, Anytime, Anywhere

Or alternatively click on the button below to view our full Public Course Calendar of close to 100 events:

2018 Public Course Calendar

Please Phone Us Now To Speak to One of Our Friendly Consultants

Tel:011-882-8853

OR

FOR CELL PHONES CLICK TO CALL

Please Fill in the Form – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

Please Email Us Now  – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

 [email protected]

Getting to grips with the Labour Relations Act of South Africa – all you need to know about how it operates

 

This article is an informative yet easily digestible summary of The Labour Relations Act South Africa which is guided by Section 27 of the Constitution.

The Labour Relations Act entrenches the rights of workers and employers to form organisations for collective bargaining.  In conjunction with the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, it also safeguards social justice in the establishment of rights and duties of employers and employees, regulates the organisational rights of trade unions, and deals with strikes and lockouts, workplace forums and other ways of resolving disputes.  Through the Commission for Conciliation Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA), Labour Court and Labour Appeal Court it also deals with strikes and lockouts, workplace forums and other ways of resolving disputes.

Labour Relations Act, labour relations

Who does the labour Relations Act apply to?

The Labour Relations Act applies to employers, employees, trade unions and employer organisations.  However, it does not apply to members of:

  • The National Defence Force
  • The National Intelligence Agency
  • The South African Secret Service

Hence, the Labour Relations Act covers the laws that govern labour in South Africa and is guided by Section 27 of the Constitution, which entrenches the rights of workers and employers to form organisations for collective bargaining.

Employer and Employee Organisations

In terms of the Act, all employees and employers have freedom of association which invariably means that they reserve the right to form, join and participate in the activities of registered organisations and that their membership means that they cannot be discriminated against.

The difference between a registered and unregistered union

Unions that are registered with the Department of Labour (DoL) are overseen by constitutions that abide by the principle of calling for a ballot prior to holding a strike or lockout.  Within the union, they also rule against racial as well as gender discrimination.  While organisations do not have to be registered with the DoL, registered unions however, are entitled to more organisational rights than otherwise.

What organisational rights entail

Trade union representatives reserve the right to carry out the following activities provided that such do not disrupt work activities.

  • Enter an employer’s premises with the intention to recruit new members
  • Conduct meetings and ballots in the workplace
  • Deduct trade union subscriptions from the salaries of members
  • Request relevant information from employees that is not legally privileged

Should a certain number of trade union members, that is, not less than 10 exist within the workplace, representatives can be elected to exercise organisational rights.

The higher the number of members a trade union has the higher the number of representatives it can choose, hence the more rights it will have in the workplace.  Should a union have organisational rights in the workplace its representatives will be entitled to oversee certain functions as follows:

  • Assist employees with grievance and disciplinary hearings
  • Monitor employer compliance in terms of Labour Law
  • Report on contraventions of the Labour Relations Act.

Union representatives are also entitled to a reasonable period of paid leave in order to perform such tasks.

How a union acquires organisation rights

Registered trade unions need to first follow the correct procedure in order to exercise organisational rights within the workplace.  Employers should be given fair warning of the union’s intention to exercise its rights and the union should prove that there is adequate support with respect to its endeavours within the organisation.

In the case where an agreement cannot be reached in terms of granting organisational rights the matter can be referred to the CCMA.  A commissioner will be appointed in an attempt to resolve the dispute through conciliation and if the dispute cannot be resolved either party can request that the matter be settled through arbitration.

  • The right to strike

Instead of approaching the CCMA a union may choose to strike.  However, should it do so it will need to wait for a period of one year prior to requesting the CCMA to grant organisational rights.

Union Security Agreements

Two types of agreements provide additional security and boost the bargaining power a union has.

  • Agency shop agreement

The agency shop agreement is a system whereby non-union employees are required to pay a certain amount of money into a special fund as a result of them benefiting from the union’s activities in the workplace or sector.

  • Conditions
    • The agency shop agreement system can only be put in place if the majority of employees in the workplace are members of the union
    • The amount of money paid into the special fund by non-union employees cannot exceed a normal member’s subscription amount
    • The fund should be used exclusively for the purposes of advancing the socio-economic interests of employees and may not, for example, be used to pay political parties. However, it can be used for example in a campaign against a VAT increase.
  • The closed shop agreement

The closed shop agreement entails that the employer and union both agree to compulsory union membership.  Those workers who do not wish to join a union can face dismissal and expulsion from the union will also result in dismissal.

  • Conditions
    • The union must be a majority union where the relevant employer and the union in question both agree to a closed shop system.
    • A ballot must be held among employees in question and a two thirds majority must be in favour of the closed shop system in order for it to be implemented.
    • Funds used are also restricted to the advancement of the socio-economic interests of its members.

BOTI offers courses on the Labour Relations Act across South Africa.  Book now!

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training Course

What takes place when employees do not wish to join a union

When employees refuse to belong to a union on the grounds of conscience they are referred to as conscientious objectors.   In this case, they can request that their contribution be paid into a fund managed by the Department of Labour (DoL).   Where a closed shop agreement is concerned conscientious objectors who are dismissed may challenge their dismissal in the Labour Court.  Should the Labour Court find in favour of the objector, the union and not the employer will be required to pay due compensation.

Should at least one third of the employees sign a petition to end the agreement at least three years after a closed shop agreement was made a ballot should be held to establish whether the agreement should continue.

Collective bargaining

The Labour Relations Act promotes what is termed: centralised collective bargaining which describes employers in a sector or area of work who join forces to bargain with one or more unions who may be representing their employees.  For instance, a group of mining companies may join forces in order to negotiate with mineworkers’ unions.

Three systems are involved in collective bargaining.

  • Collective agreement

The collective agreement is a simple agreement between an employer, for example, the Chamber of Mines and a union/s, for example, the National Union of Mineworkers.   The collective agreement only affects these two parties concerned.

  • Conditions
    • Both parties must agree to a collective agreement.
  • Bargaining councils

A bargaining council agreement covers a wide range of issues for example wages, benefits and grievance procedures and extends to all employers and employees within the boundaries of the council’s representation provided that certain requirements are adhered to.

  • Conditions
    • In order to establish a bargaining council there should be sufficient representation in both the union and employer organisations. The degree of representation must be approved by the National Economic Development and Labour Council (NEDLAC).
  • Rights
    • It is the task of bargaining council agents to monitor and enforce all collective agreements. Hence, they have the power to issue compliance orders, publish the contents of collective agreements and conduct investigations into various complaints.

Statutory Councils

A statutory council is a weaker version of the bargaining council.  It cannot be extended to any parties external to the council without the approval of the Minister of Labour.

  • Conditions
    • There must be a 30% representation on both sides in order to establish a statutory council which means that at least 30% of the workers must be employed by 30% of the employers in the sector.
  • Rights
    • Even in a workplace that has no union members unions that are members of a statutory council are entitled to organisational rights of access, ballots, meetings and stop order facilities.

Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

Set up by Section 35 of the Act, the Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC) is one of the most important bargaining councils and is responsible for negotiating common issues among public service employees.  It has the right to establish additional bargaining councils for various sectors involved in public service.

The Labour Relations Act makes provision for workplace forums

The Labour Relations Act also makes provision for workplace forums that encourage all employees, including non-trade union members to engage in promoting their own interests in the workplace.  Workplace forums comprise elected workers who engage with interested parties regularly to discuss conditions in the workplace.  Such issues handled by workplace forums are better suited to resolution through consultation as opposed to collective bargaining, for instance, education and training, job grading, criteria for increases or bonuses, product development plans and mergers or transfers of ownership.

Workplace forums also have the right to present other proposals to the employer which should be given due consideration.  The employer must provide the forum with concrete reasons should such proposals be rejected.

The aim of workplace forums is to establish a dialogue in the workplace that will boost efficiency in the workplace and employers can consult workplace forums regarding various issues.   While workplace forums do not remove the employer’s right to make unilateral decisions, they increase employee representation in the workplace.

Joint decision-making issues

Joint decision-making issues refer to certain workplace issues that are set aside by the Act which means that employers are required to consult with workplace forums regarding these particular issues as follows:

  • Disciplinary procedures and codes
  • Rules that govern social benefit schemes such as housing or provident funds
  • Workplace rules that are not related to employee conduct
  • Affirmative action measures

N.B.  Did you know?  In terms of the Labour Relations Act employees cannot strike over joint decision-making issues

As prescribed by collective agreements between employers and representative trade unions, issues can either be added to or removed from this list.

As far as such issues are concerned agreement must be reached otherwise they should be referred to the CCMA.  Should the matter fail to be resolved the employer can request that it be resolved through arbitration.

Employees may not strike over joint decision-making issues.

Establishing a workplace forum

The setting up of a workplace forum is restricted to a representative and registered trade union or group of unions and a workplace forum may only be established in a workplace consisting of more than 100 employees.  The process is overseen by the CCMA who appoints a commissioner to assist both parties in coming to an agreement in terms of the functions of the forum.  Should agreement not be reached the CCMA will establish a forum that abides by the rules of the Act.

Guidelines for the constitution of a workplace forum, in particular the process of electing a workplace forum can be found in Schedule 2 of the Act.

Special rights are assigned to trade unions who are recognised by employers as the bargaining agent for all employees.  In this case, they may apply to the CCMA to set up a trade union based workplace forum which means that the union can appoint forum representatives without holding an election.

A workplace forum can only be dissolved if there is a private agreement that allows for this.  Should there be no private agreement in place, a workplace forum can only be dissolved if a representative from the trade union requests a ballot that results in a majority vote in favour of the dissolution of the forum.

  • The rights of workplace forum representatives
    • Each member of the workplace forum must be given a realistic amount of time off to carry out duties and/or receive training with no salary deductions.
    • An employer must provide facilities in order for the forum to operate.
    • Workplace forums may invite experts to attend meetings

 

Workplace forums – how they operate

Workplace forums operate by conducting three types of meetings.

  • Holding regular meetings with representatives
  • Holding regular meetings with the employer during which session the employer must present a report on the company’s performance and financial situation. The employer must also report on the company’s financial situation and any future plans on a yearly basis.
  • Holding meetings with other employees in the workplace to report on activities and any joint decisions made by those at the meeting as well as the employer.
  • Meetings are conducted during working hours and workers concerned are entitled to full wages.

BOTI offers courses on the Labour Relations Act across South Africa.  Book now!

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training Course Course

Industrial Action

All industrial action, including strikes, lockouts and picketing is regulated by the Labour Relations Act.   The Act allows for the constitutional rights of employees to strike and provides recourse to employers to seek recourse via lockouts.

When a worker can strike and when an employer can lockout

Disputes over matters of mutual interest between employers and employees may involve strikes and lockouts.  Such include:

  • Wage increases
  • The demand for the recognition of a union as a collective bargaining agent
  • The demand to establish or join a bargaining council
  • The demand for organisational rights
  • The demand to suspend or negotiate unilateral changes in the workplace
  • Unprotected lockouts or strikes by the other party
  • Workers may, in certain cases, strike over retrenchments

What a lockout entails

A lockout takes place when an employer decides to withdraw work from employees or closes the workplace during a labour dispute.

Strikes

Refusing to work only constitutes a strike if two or more workers participate in the action. As long as the refusal to work has a common work-related purpose, the workers concerned may work for different employers.  For example, a domestic worker cannot strike alone yet mineworkers working for different employers are able to do so.

Varying degrees of strike action exist, including:

  • go-slows involving workers decreasing productivity rates
  • work-to-rule which means that employees do no more than the bare minimum required by the rules of the workplace in question
  • intermittent strikes which takes place when employees start and stop the same strike action over a period of time
  • overtime bans which take place when workers refuse to do any voluntary or compulsory overtime work

Two types of strike action exist:

 

Protected Strikes

The first involves protected strikes which provide workers with a certain degree of security in the sense that they cannot be dismissed for striking unless they engage in activities involving misconduct during the strike and employers cannot get a court interdict to stop the strike. Employers are also not allowed to seek damages due to production losses during the strike and they must continue to provide food and accommodation should such form part of the employees’ wages, although employers can reclaim such funds by applying to the Labour Court once the strike has ended.

In terms of the Labour Relations Act workers must follow certain steps in order to commence a protected strike.

  • The issue over which workers intend to strike must first be referred to a bargaining or statutory council or the CCMA.
  • The council concerned or CCMA must attempt to resolve the issue through conciliation within a 30 d ay period.
  • Should the matter remain unresolved a certificate to this effect must be issued.
  • The employer concerned must be given 48 hours’ notice of the intended strike by workers unless the employer is the State where in this instance a 7 day notice period is required.

Union members may force a registered union to hold a ballot prior to holding a protected strike.  A special procedure for disputes also exists which concerns refusals to bargain.  In such instances workers must obtain what is termed an advisory award prior to the strike which cannot force parties to bargain.

  • Exceptions

There are certain situations whereby workers do not need to follow procedure.  Such include:

  • Should the strike be in response to an unprocedural lockout
  • Should the strike be allowed in terms of the conditions of a collective agreement
  • Where the parties to the dispute are council members and the matter has been dealt with in terms of the constitution of the council
  • Should an employer unilaterally change an employee’s working conditions

Unprotected Strikes

If proper procedure is not followed or if any of the following apply a strike will not be protected:

  • A collective agreement is in place that protects the issue being disputed from strike action
  • In terms of this Act, or any collective agreement, the matter must be referred to arbitration or to the Labour Court.
  • The issue is regulated by an arbitration award, collective agreement or sectoral determination.
  • The parties are involved in providing an essential service, for example the South African Police Service (SAPS) and any service that protects personal or public safety or maintenance service, that is where the interruption of that service will physically destroy the working area.

Lockouts

A lockout takes place when an employer prevents employees from entering the workplace in an attempt to force them to accept a demand.  As with strike action, there are protected lockouts and unprotected lockouts.

Protected Lockouts

In the case of a protected lockout workers cannot apply to the court to get an interdict against the action and the lockout does not constitute a breach of contract on the part of the employer.  As is the case with protected strikes employers are not required to pay wages while a protected lockout is underway and employees cannot sue their employers for any losses sustained.  Nevertheless, an employer cannot dismiss an employee who has been locked out and replacement labour can only be hired if the lockout is in response to a strike and for the duration of the lockout.  As with protected strikes, the same rules apply to food and clothing.

In order for a lockout to be protected, employers must follow proper procedure – which is the same as the procedure for holding a protected strike:

  • The issue over which workers intend to strike must first be referred to a bargaining or statutory council or the CCMA.
  • The council concerned or CCMA must attempt to resolve the issue through conciliation within a 30 day period.
  • Should the matter remain unresolved a certificate to this effect must be issued.
  • The employer concerned must be given 48 hours’ notice of the intended strike by workers unless the employer is the State where in this instance a 7 day notice period is required.
  • Exceptions

As with protected strikes, there are certain cases in which this procedure does not have to be followed.  Such include:

  • when the parties to the dispute are members of a council that has dealt with the dispute within its constitution
  • when the lockout has been allowed by the procedures in a collective agreement
  • when the lockout is in response to an unprocedural strike.

 

Picketing

Only a registered trade union has the right to authorise a picket and it can only be held in a public place outside of the workplace, unless the union has the employer’s permission to picket.  The picket must be peaceful and must follow the Code of Good Practice on Picketing issued by NEDLAC.


Labour Relations Act, Labour Relations

BOTI offers business training courses on the Labour Relations Act across South Africa.  Book now!

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training Course

Dismissal and disciplinary procedure

Dismissal involves any of the following:

  • A contract of employment has been terminated by an employer with our without notice.
  • An employee reasonably expected the employer to renew a fixed term contract of employment on the same or similar terms but the employer offered to renew the contract on less favourable terms or did not renew it at all
  • An employer refuses to allow a female employee to resume work after taking maternity leave in terms of any law, collective agreement or her contract of employment or was absent from work for up to four weeks before the expected date, and up to eight weeks after the actual date of birth of her child.
  • An employer who dismisses a number of employees for the same or similar reasons has offered to re-employ one or more of them but has refused to re-employ another
  • An employee terminates a contract of employment with our without notice because the employer made continued employment intolerable for the employee

 

When can an employee be dismissed?

An employee can only be dismissed for misconductincapacity or business-related (i.e. operational) reasons.   However, proper procedure for dismissal must always be followed.

Misconduct entails an employee having deliberately or carelessly broken a rule at the workplace, for example, stealing. In such cases, a person may only be dismissed once the employer has followed proper procedure for dismissal due to incapacity.

Incapacity means that the worker has been unable to perform his or her duties properly because of ill health or lack of skills, that is inability.  If an employee is not doing their job properly, he or she can only be dismissed once the employer has followed correct procedures.

May the 4th Industrial Revolution be with you – Part 2:  Welcome to the 4th Industrial Revolution, you can check out any time you like but you can never leave

This is the second in a series of articles that explore the impact of the 4th Industrial Revolution on how we are living our lives today and how we should go about earning a living in the years to come.

There is no point to hiding in the shadows of our former state

There are some that will say that the 4th Industrial Revolution has indeed already reared its head.  Yet, there are also those that maintain that it is still a distance away.   One way or the other, there is no point to hiding in the shadows of our former state.

For 24 years I’ve been living next door to Alice – but, are the Borg now moving in?

The 3rd Industrial Revolution has been in effect for over a quarter of a century.   But, even though Alice’s 24 years might just be up, the Borg from Star Trek may not yet be living in the house next door and your organisation may not yet have felt the cool, gentle breeze ahead of the wave of change in an age of man blending with machine.  But, according to recent research conducted by global consulting firms, the next decade will see the arrival of the 4th Industrial Revolution in full force.  Along with that a whole new species of machine-driven creatures will evolve out of the changing landscape of today’s training and development arena.

For 24 years I’ve been living next door to Alice but are the Borg now moving in?

 

New technologies will both disrupt and open new job avenues

In October 2018, the World Economic Forum (WEF) released their Future of Jobs 2018 report and its findings disclose the impact that new technologies will have on both disrupting and opening new job avenues and how to prepare the workforce to take on entirely different roles.  Human resources officers and strategy executives from companies across 12 industries and 20 developed and emerging economies participated in the survey.

Don’t rage against the machine in the changing face of the workforce

A major finding reveals that by 2022 more than 50% of all tasks performed in the workplace will be handled by machines and algorithms.  Currently, we are hovering at the 29% level.  Yet, the upside to this is that more machines taking up residence within the workplace, could mean the creation of 133 million new jobs compared to the 75 million jobs that will be displaced by 2022.  So, before we begin to panic or even rage against the machine, let’s examine what the experts say.

Don’t rage against the machine in the changing face of the workforce

Social media and software development on the rise

While increased automation will impact the nature of work in terms of location, format, quality and whether roles are temporary or permanent, it also opens doors that invite demand for new roles to be established.  Such roles include the likes of e-commerce and social media specialists, scientists, data analysts and application and software developers.

Certain other roles do still need human skills

Despite the rise of the machines, it is also anticipated that there will be an increased demand for certain other roles that do still need human skills.  Customer service experts, innovation managers and sales and marketing people are top of the list.

White collar jobs facing obsolescence

Those roles that will disappear into obsolescence fall under the category of white-collar jobs such as pay-roll and accounting clerks.

Companies participating in the survey revealed that the mining and metals and consumer and information technologies industries are expected to suffer more in terms of job displacement as opposed to jobs in companies that offer professional services whereas job demand is likely to be created in other industries.

Increased automation will allow for more flexible working conditions

It is also likely that companies will introduce working conditions that are more flexible and employ more remote staff and contract workers in a specialist task capacity.

Employees will need to be reskilled and upskilled to prepare for jobs created by the 4th Industrial Revolution.

Though it is anticipated that every industry will have skills gaps that need to be filled, the travel and tourism industry as well as the aviation industry are expected to need the greatest amount of reskilling to cope with the changes to come over the next four years.

Region specific roles

Certain roles will also become region specific.  For instance, it is expected that the demand for factory workers will increase in the Middle East, North Africa, Latin America and the sub-Saharan African regions.  Whereas, the demand for financial and investment advisors will increase in the Pacific, East Asia and Western European regions.

Everyone on board

Getting things right in the face of constant change means that everyone needs to be on board.  The role of governments in dealing with the impact of new technologies on labour markets remains critical and business and government are set to plan to create 275 000 jobs each year over the next five years.   This drive includes solutions that focus on technical skills training in the hospitality, construction and automotive industries.

Welcome to the 4th Industrial Revolution – you can check out any time you like, but you can never leave

In every day and age, embracing the changes that are to come are not always easy and there are those that will wish for the return of the ‘old days’ when simple technologies were exactly that – simple.   But, let’s try a simple experiment.  Stand still for a moment and ask yourself how you would feel if your car broke down one night while you were travelling a dark desert highway with the cool wind in your hair and up ahead in the distance you saw a shimmering light that wasn’t the rescue beacon linked to an app on your cell phone that you thought it was.   Welcome to the 4th Industrial Revolution – you can check out any time you like, but you can never leave.

(Reference source:  Fin24)

Helen Fenton, Senior Analyst:  Business Optimization Training Institute – www.boti.co.za

May the 4th Industrial Revolution be with you – Part 2:  Welcome to the 4th Industrial Revolution, you can check out any time you like but you can never leave

May the 4th Industrial Revolution be with you – Part 2:  Welcome to the 4th Industrial Revolution, you can check out any time you like but you can never leave

This is the second in a series of articles that explore the impact of the 4th Industrial Revolution on how we are living our lives today and how we should go about earning a living in the years to come.

There is no point to hiding in the shadows of our former state

There are some that will say that the 4th Industrial Revolution has indeed already reared its head.  Yet, there are also those that maintain that it is still a distance away.   One way or the other, there is no point to hiding in the shadows of our former state.

For 24 years I’ve been living next door to Alice – but, are the Borg now moving in?

The 3rd Industrial Revolution has been in effect for over a quarter of a century.   But, even though Alice’s 24 years might just be up, the Borg from Star Trek may not yet be living in the house next door and your organisation may not yet have felt the cool, gentle breeze ahead of the wave of change in an age of man blending with machine.  But, according to recent research conducted by global consulting firms, the next decade will see the arrival of the 4th Industrial Revolution in full force.  Along with that a whole new species of machine-driven creatures will evolve out of the changing landscape of today’s training and development arena.

For 24 years I’ve been living next door to Alice – but, are the Borg now moving in?

 

New technologies will both disrupt and open new job avenues

In October 2018, the World Economic Forum (WEF) released their Future of Jobs 2018 report and its findings disclose the impact that new technologies will have on both disrupting and opening new job avenues and how to prepare the workforce to take on entirely different roles.  Human resources officers and strategy executives from companies across 12 industries and 20 developed and emerging economies participated in the survey.

 

Don’t rage against the machine in the changing face of the workforce

A major finding reveals that by 2022 more than 50% of all tasks performed in the workplace will be handled by machines and algorithms.  Currently, we are hovering at the 29% level.  Yet, the upside to this is that more machines taking up residence within the workplace, could mean the creation of 133 million new jobs compared to the 75 million jobs that will be displaced by 2022.  So, before we begin to panic or even rage against the machine, let’s examine what the experts say.

Don’t rage against the machine in the changing face of the workforce

 

Social media and software development on the rise

While increased automation will impact the nature of work in terms of location, format, quality and whether roles are temporary or permanent, it also opens doors that invite demand for new roles to be established.  Such roles include the likes of e-commerce and social media specialists, scientists, data analysts and application and software developers.

Certain other roles do still need human skills

Despite the rise of the machines, it is also anticipated that there will be an increased demand for certain other roles that do still need human skills.  Customer service experts, innovation managers and sales and marketing people are top of the list.

 

White collar jobs facing obsolescence

Those roles that will disappear into obsolescence fall under the category of white-collar jobs such as pay-roll and accounting clerks.

Companies participating in the survey revealed that the mining and metals and consumer and information technologies industries are expected to suffer more in terms of job displacement as opposed to jobs in companies that offer professional services whereas job demand is likely to be created in other industries.

 

Increased automation will allow for more flexible working conditions

It is also likely that companies will introduce working conditions that are more flexible and employ more remote staff and contract workers in a specialist task capacity.

Employees will need to be reskilled and upskilled to prepare for jobs created by the 4th Industrial Revolution.

Though it is anticipated that every industry will have skills gaps that need to be filled, the travel and tourism industry as well as the aviation industry are expected to need the greatest amount of reskilling to cope with the changes to come over the next four years.

 

Region specific roles

Certain roles will also become region specific.  For instance, it is expected that the demand for factory workers will increase in the Middle East, North Africa, Latin America and the sub-Saharan African regions.  Whereas, the demand for financial and investment advisors will increase in the Pacific, East Asia and Western European regions.

 

Everyone on board

Getting things right in the face of constant change means that everyone needs to be on board.  The role of governments in dealing with the impact of new technologies on labour markets remains critical and business and government are set to plan to create 275 000 jobs each year over the next five years.   This drive includes solutions that focus on technical skills training in the hospitality, construction and automotive industries.

 

Welcome to the 4th Industrial Revolution – you can check out any time you like, but you can never leave

In every day and age, embracing the changes that are to come are not always easy and there are those that will wish for the return of the ‘old days’ when simple technologies were exactly that – simple.   But, let’s try a simple experiment.  Stand still for a moment and ask yourself how you would feel if your car broke down one night while you were travelling a dark desert highway with the cool wind in your hair and up ahead in the distance you saw a shimmering light that wasn’t the rescue beacon linked to an app on your cell phone that you thought it was.   Welcome to the 4th Industrial Revolution – you can check out any time you like, but you can never leave.

 

(Reference source:  Fin24)

Helen Fenton, Senior Analyst:  Business Optimization Training Institute – boti.co.za

 

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training Course

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training Course Course

Form will be here 

Contact Us Now For A Free Invitation to Work With South Africa’s Leading Training Company

Email: [email protected]

Tel: 011-882-8853

Tel: 082-040-0987 (Amanda)

Tel: 063-767-5736 (Odette)

Watch Video Now

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training Course Course: Introduction

The face of Human Resources has changed drastically, we offer this course (Human Resources Training, HR Courses) for all who need training in Human Resource management.

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training Course Course :Course Outline

1. IntroductionUnderstand Performance ReviewsUnderstand Labour LegislationDeal With Disciplinary hearings

2. Recruiting personnelActive Recruitment

3. Course OutcomesFormulating Performance StandardsEstablish Monitoring SystemsPreparing for Performance ReviewConducting Performance Review Interview

4. Plan and Prepare for recruitmentRecruit applicantsSelect staff

5. Basic Conditions of Employment ActPurpose and ApplicationParticulars of Employment

6. Legal ProceedingsUnderstand legal proceedings according to the ActHandle disciplinary hearingsReach informed decisions

Related Terms include Human Resource Management Short Course, Labour Law Training South Africa, Human Resource Management Courses South Africa, Short Courses In Human Resources.

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training Course (Human Resources Training, HR Courses) : Course Duration

2 day/s

Who should attend: Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training Course (Human Resources Training, HR Courses)

This course (Human Resources Training, HR Courses) is intended for those working in HR and Labour Relations.

**Quote does not include Any Exam Fees (if applicable)

IMPORTANT ACTION: Do Not Wait To Improve Your Skills.  

Book Now By Completing Online Booking Form / Customised Proposal or Obtain Approval For Your Already Received Customised Proposal

Please Phone Us Now To Speak to One of Our Friendly Consultants

Tel:011-882-8853

So you want to be a manager – here’s what you need to know about Management as a discipline, the four Management functions, its purpose and practise

management, leadership, management training

Management = Planning + Organising + Leading + Controlling

We took a look behind the scenes at some of the most important aspects of what managers and aspiring managers need to know about management as a whole and crafted our thoughts into a single page resource to include our top key topics  that will enlighten and guide you. 

1. Heads up on the four basic functions of management

2. The Evolution of Management

3. Fundamental Management Skills and the Science and Art of Management

4. Management Perspectives

5.Strategic management and organisational goals and understanding the key concepts

6. Strategic plans and the implementation process

7. The Importance of Business Implementation and implementation strategies

 

1. Heads up on the four basic functions of management 

Management is a systematic way of doing things

When introducing the four basic functions of management keep in mind that the management process is a systematic way of doing things.

All managers, irrespective of their aptitude or level of skill, engage in certain inter-related functions in order to achieve their desired goals.

All managers carry out the main functions of management; planning, organizing, staffing, leading and controlling. But depending on the skills and position on an organizational level, the time and labour spent on each function will differ.

In a nutshell the four basic management functions involve:

  • Planning and Decision Making – determining courses of action
  • Organizing – Co-ordination of activities and resources
  • Leading – Managing and motivating people
  • Controlling – Monitoring and evaluating activities

The diagram below illustrates the inter-related functions of the management process.

management, leadership, management training

The four functions of management: Planning, Organizing, Leading and Controlling

Planning and Decision Making – Determining Courses of Action

The planning and decision making function involves looking ahead into the future and predicting possible trends or occurrences which are likely to influence the working situation is possibly one of the most critical skills a manager can possess.

Planning means setting goals

Planning means setting the goals of the organization and deciding how best to go about achieving these goals.  Planning involves decision making around the goals to be set and the future course of action to be taken from a given set of alternatives so as to effectively reach these goals.

Planning ensures management effectiveness

The planning phase ensures management effectiveness since it serves to guide the future activities of the business.  Essentially, the important elements include selecting appropriate goals and the paths to be taken to effectively achieve these goals.

For a manager, planning and decision-making require an ability to foresee, to visualize, and to look ahead purposefully.

Organizing – Co-ordinating Activities and Resources

Organizing can be defined as the process by which the established plans are moved closer to being realised.

Once a manager has set goals and developed appropriate plans as a means to achieve them the next managerial task involves organizing human and other resources that are identified as necessary by the plan to reach the said goals and objectives.

Organizing involves determining how activities and resources are to be assembled and coordinated

Organizing produces a structure of relationships in an organization and it is through these structured relationships that future plans are pursued.

Organizing, then, is that part of managing which involves establishing an intentional structure of roles for people to fill in the organization.

It is intentional in the sense of making sure that all the tasks necessary to accomplish goals are assigned to people who are best suited to achieving these tasks.   The purpose of an organization structure is to create an environment for optimal human performance.

Structure

The structure should define the tasks to be completed. The rules as established must also be designed in the light of the abilities and motivations of the people available.

Staffing is related to organizing and it involves filling and keeping filled, the positions in the organization structure.

This can be achieved by determining the positions to be filled, identifying the requirement of manpower, filling the vacancies and training employees so that the assigned tasks are accomplished effectively and efficiently.

The managerial functions of promotion, demotion, discharge, dismissal, transfer, and so forth are also included within the broad task of “staffing.”  Staffing ensures the placement of the right person in the right position.

Organizing involves deciding where decisions will be made, who will do what jobs and tasks, who will work for whom, and how resources will be assembled.

Leading – Managing and Motivating People

The third essential managerial function is leading.  The skills attributed to influencing people for a particular purpose or reason are aptly termed as ‘leading’.  Leading is considered to be the most important and challenging of all managerial activities.

Leading is influencing or prompting members of an organization to work together with the interests of the organization at the core of activities.

Creating a positive attitude

Creating a positive attitude towards the work and goals to be achieved among the members of the organization also falls within the scope of the function of ‘leading’, it is an essential requirement as it helps to instil the objective of effectiveness and efficiency by changing the behavior of employees to meet the business objectives of the organisation.

The functions of direction, motivation, communication, and coordination are considered as part of the leading process or system.

The importance of co-ordinating

Coordinating is also essential with respect to the task of leading. Co-ordinating is regarded as the essence of good management for achieving harmony among individual efforts in pursuit of the accomplishment of designated group targets.

Motivating is an essential quality of good leadership.  Motivating is the function of the management process that deals with influencing people’s behavior based on the knowledge of what causes and channels sustain human behavior in a particularly committed direction.  Efficient managers need to be effective leaders.

Since leadership implies fellowship and people tend to follow those who offer a means of satisfying their own needs, hopes and aspirations it is understandable that leading involves motivation leadership styles and approaches as well as good communication skills.

Controlling – Monitoring and Evaluating Activities

Monitoring the organizational progress toward goal fulfillment is the management function known as ‘controlling’. Monitoring progress is essential to ensuring the achievement of organizational goals.

Controlling involves measuring, comparing, finding deviation and correcting the organizational activities which are performed in respect of achieving the goals or objectives of the organisation.

Control activities generally related to the measurement of achievement of results

Controlling consists of activities such as measuring performance, comparing with the existing standard and finding the deviations, and correcting the deviations.  Control activities generally relate to the measurement of achievement or results of actions which were taken to attain the goals in question.

Certain means of controlling, such as the budget for expenses, inspection records, and the record of labour hours lost, are generally familiar. Each measure also shows whether plans are working out or whether they need to be revised.

Deviations

If deviations persist, correction is indicated. Whenever results are found to differ from the planned action, the individuals responsible are identified and necessary actions are taken to improve performance.

Thus, outcomes are controlled by controlling what people do. Controlling is the last but not the least important management function process.

It is rightly said, “planning without controlling is useless”. In short, we can say that controlling enables the accomplishment of the plan.

All management functions are inter-related and cannot be skipped. The management process designs and maintains an environment in which people working together in groups, accomplish efficiently selected aims and objectives.

management, leadership, management training

Organizing is that part of managing which involves establishing an intentional structure of roles for people to fill in the organization

2. The Evolution of Management

Most managers today recognise the importance of history.  Knowing the origins of their organisation and the kinds of practices that have led to success or failure can be an indispensable tool to managing the contemporary organisation. Thus, in this section we trace the history of management thought. Then we move forward to the present day by introducing contemporary management issues and challenges.

The importance of theory and history

Some people question the value of history and theory.  Their arguments are usually based on the assumption that history has no relevance to contemporary society and that theory is abstract and of no practical use.  In reality, however, both theory and history are important to all managers today.  A theory is simply a conceptual framework for organising knowledge and providing a blueprint for action.  While some theories seem abstract and irrelevant, others appear very simple and practical.  Management theories, used to build organisations and guide them toward their goals, are grounded in reality.   In addition, most managers develop and refine their own theories of how they should run their organisations and manage the behaviour of their employees.

An awareness and understanding of important historical developments are also essential to contemporary managers. Understanding the historical context of management provides a sense of heritage and can help managers avoid the mistakes of others.

The historical context of management

The practice of management can be traced back thousands of years.  The Egyptians used the management functions of planning, organising, and controlling when they constructed the great pyramids.   Alexander the Great employed a staff organisation to co-ordinate activities during his military campaigns.  The Roman Empire developed a well-defined organisational structure that greatly facilitated communication and control.  In spite of this history, however, management per se was not given serious attention until the nineteenth century.

Two of its first true pioneers were Robert Owen (1771-1858) and Charles Babbage (1792-1871).  Owen, a British industrialist and reformer, was one of the first managers to recognise the importance of an organisation’s human resources and the welfare of workers. Charles Babbage, an English mathematician, focused his attention on efficiencies of production. He placed great faith in division of labour and advocated the application of mathematics to problems such as the efficient use of facilities and materials.

The classical management perspective

At the dawn of the twentieth century, the preliminary ideas and writings of these and other managers and theorists converged with the emergence and evolution of largescale businesses and management practices to create interest and focus attention on how businesses should be operated. The first important ideas to emerge are now called the classical management perspective. This perspective actually includes two different viewpoints: scientific management and administrative management.

Scientific Management

Productivity emerged as a serious business problem during the first few years of this century. Business was expanding and capital was readily available, but labour was in short supply. Hence, managers began to search for ways to use existing labour more efficiently.   In response to this need, experts began to focus on ways to improve the performance of individual workers. Their work led to the development of scientific management.  Some of the earliest advocates of scientific management included Frederick W Taylor (1856-1915), Frank Gilbreth (1868-1924), and Lillian Gilbreth (1878- 1972).  One of Taylor’s first jobs was as a foreman at the Midvale Steel Company in Philadelphia.  It was there that he observed what he called soldiering-employees deliberately working at a pace slower than their capabilities. Taylor studied and timed each element of the steelworkers’ jobs. He determined what each worker should be producing, and then he designed the most efficient way of doing each part of the overall task. Next, he implemented a piecework pay system. Rather than paying all employees the same wage, he began increasing the pay of each worker who met and exceeded the target level of output set for his or her job.

Administrative Management

Whereas scientific management deals with the jobs of individual employees, administrative management focuses on managing the total organisation. The primary contributors to administrative management were Henri Fayol (1841-1925), Lyndall Urwick (1891-1983), and Max Weber (1864-1920). Henri Fayol was administrative management’s most articulate spokesperson. A French industrialist, Fayol was unknown to U.S. managers and scholars until his most important work, General and Industrial Management, was trans lated into English in 1930. Drawing on his own managerial experience, he attempted to systematise the practice of management to provide guidance and direction to other managers.  Fayol also was the first to identify the specific managerial functions of planning, organising, leading, and controlling.  He believed that these functions accurately reflect the core of the management process.

Most contemporary management books (including this one) still use this framework, and practicing managers agree that these functions are a critical part of a manager’s job. After a career as a British army officer, Lyndall Urwick became a noted management theorist and consultant. He integrated scientific management with the work of Fayol and other administrative management theorists. He also advanced modern thinking about the functions of planning, organizing, and controlling. Like Fayol, Urwick developed a list of guidelines for improving managerial effectiveness. Urwick is noted not so much for his own contributions as for his synthesis and integration of the work of others.  Although Max Weber lived and worked at the same time as Fayol and Taylor, his contributions were not recognised until some years had passed. Weber was a German sociologist, and his most important work was not translated into English until 1947.18 Weber’s work on bureaucracy laid the foundation for contemporary organisation theory.

management, leadership, management training

Management is a systematic way of doing things

3. Fundamental Management Skills and the Science and Art of Management

Given the complexity inherent in the job of a manager a reasonable question to be asked is whether management is a science or an art.  In fact, effective management is a blend of both science and art in its application.  And successful executives recognise and value the importance of combining both the science and the art of management as they practice their craft.

The Science of Management

Many management problems and issues can be approached in ways that are rational, logically thought out , objective, and systematic.  Managers can gather data, facts and objective information. They can use quantitative models and decision-making techniques to arrive at “correct” decisions.

They also need to take a decidedly scientific approach to solving problems whenever possible, especially when they are dealing with relatively routine and straightforward issues. For example, when the multinational, Starbucks, considers entering a new market, its managers look closely at a wide variety of objective details as they formulate their plans. Technical, diagnostic, and decision-making skills are especially important when practicing the science of management.

The Art of Management

Even though managers may try to be as scientific as possible, they often need to make decisions and solve problems on the basis of intuition, experience, instinct as well as personal insights.  By relying heavily on conceptual, communication, interpersonal, and time management skills, for example, a manager may have to decide between multiple courses of action that look equally attractive.  In many cases even “objective facts” may prove to be wrong. When Starbucks was planning its first store in New York, market research clearly showed that New Yorkers preferred drip coffee to more exotic espresso-style coffees.  After first installing more drip coffee makers and fewer espresso makers than in their other stores, managers had to backtrack when the New Yorkers lined up clamouring for espresso.  Starbucks now introduces a standard menu and layout in all its stores, regardless of presumed market differences, and makes necessary adjustments later down the line. Thus, managers must blend an element of intuition and personal insight with hard data and objective facts.

To carry out these management functions properly, managers rely on a number of specific skills.  The most important management skills are technical, interpersonal, conceptual, diagnostic, communication, decision-making, and time-management skills.

Technical Skills

Technical skills are the skills necessary to accomplish or understand the specific kind of work being done in an organisation.  Technical skills are especially important for first-line managers.  These managers spend much of their time training subordinates and answering questions about work-related problems.  First-line managers must know how to perform the tasks assigned to those they supervise if they are to be effective managers.

Interpersonal Skills

Managers spend a considerable amount of time interacting with people both inside and outside the organisation. Therefore, for obvious reasons, managers also need interpersonal skills, and the ability to communicate with, understand, and motivate individuals and groups.  As a manager climbs the organisational ladder, he or she must be able to get along with subordinates and peers, as well as those at higher levels of the organisation.  Because of the multitude of roles managers must attend to they must also be able to work withsuppliers, customers, investors and others outside of the organisation.

Conceptual Skills

Conceptual skills depend on the manager’s ability to think in the abstract.  Managers need the mental capacity to understand the overall workings of the organisation and its environment, to grasp how all the parts of the organization fit together, and to view the organisation in a holistic manner.  These skills enable them to think strategically, to see the bigger picture and to make broad-based decisions that serve the organisation overall.

Diagnostic Skills

Successful managers also possess diagnostic skills, or skills that enable them to visualise the most appropriate response to a situation.  A physician diagnoses a patient’s illness by analysing symptoms and determining their probable cause.  Similarly, a manager can diagnose and analyse a problem in the organisation by studying its symptoms and then developing a solution.

Communication Skills

Communication skills refer to the manager’s ability to both effectively convey ideas and information to others and effectively receive ideas and information from others. These skills enable a manager to transmit ideas to subordinates so that they know what is expected of them, to coordinate work with peers and colleagues so that they work well together and to keep higher-level managers informed about what is going on. In addition, communication skills help the manager listen to what others say and to understand the real meaning behind e-mails, letters, reports and other written communication.

Decision-Making Skills

Effective managers also have good decision-making skills.  Decision-making skills refer to the manager’s ability to correctly recognise and define problems and opportunities and to then select an appropriate course of action to solve problems and capitalise on opportunities. No manager makes the right decision all the time.  However, effective managers make good decisions most of the time.  And when they do make a bad decision, they usually recognise their mistake quickly and then make good decisions to recover with as little cost or damage to their organisation as possible.

Time-Management Skills

Finally, effective managers usually have good time-management skills.  Time management skills refer to the manager’s ability to prioritise work, to work efficiently and to delegate appropriately.  As already noted, managers face many different pressures and challenges.  It is easy for a manager to get bogged down doing work that can easily be postponed or delegated to others.  When this happens, unfortunately, more pressing and higher-priority work may get neglected.  BOTI’s management training courses, business short courses and leadership classes offer you the opportunity to expand your management skills in all disciplines.

management, leadership, management training

Management is an integrated process

4. Management Perspectives

Assessment of the Classical Perspective

The classical perspective served to focus serious attention on the importance of effective management and helped pave the way for later theories and approaches.  Many of the concepts developed during this era, such as job specialisation, time and motion studies and scientific methods are still in use. On the other hand, these early theorists often took an overly simplistic view of management and failed to understand the human element of organisations.

The Behavioural Management Perspective

Early advocates of the classical management perspective essentially viewed organisations and jobs from a mechanistic point of view – that is, they essentially sought to conceptualise organisations as machines and workers as cogs within those machines. Even though many early writers recognised the role of individuals, these management pioneers tended to focus on how managers could control and standardise the behaviour of their employees.  In contrast, the behavioural management perspective placed much more emphasis on individual attitudes and behaviours.

The behavioural management perspective was stimulated by a number of writers and theoretical movements. One of those movements was industrial psychology, the practice of applying psychological concepts to industrial settings. Hugo Munsterberg (1863-1916), a noted German psychologist, is recognised as the father of industrial psychology.  He suggested that psychologists could make valuable contributions to managers in the areas of employee selection and motivation. Industrial psychology is still a major course of study at many colleges and universities.  Another early advocate of the behavioural approach to management was Mary Parker Follett.  Follett worked during the scientific management era, but quickly came to recognise the human element in the workplace.  Indeed, her work clearly anticipated the behavioural management perspective, and she appreciated the need to understand the role of human behaviour in organisations.  Her specific interests were in adult education and vocational guidance. Follett believed that organisations should become more democratic in accommodating employees and managers.

The Hawthorne Studies

Although Munsterberg and Follett made major contributions to the development of the behavioural approach to management, its primary catalyst was a series of studies conducted near Chicago at Western Electric’s Hawthorne plant between 1927 and 1932.

The research, originally sponsored by General Electric, was conducted by Elton Mayo and his associates. The first study involved manipulating illumination for one group of workers and comparing their subsequent productivity with the productivity. of another group whose illumination was not changed.  Surprisingly, when illumination was increased for the experimental group, productivity went up in both groups.  Productivity continued to increase in both groups, even when the lighting for the experimental group was decreased. Not until the lighting was reduced to the level of moonlight did productivity begin to decline (and General Electric withdrew its sponsorship).  Another experiment established a piecework incentive pay plan for a group of nine men assembling terminal banks for telephone exchanges.  Scientific management would have predicted that each man would try to maximize his pay by producing as many units as possible.  Mayo and his associates, however, found that the group itself informally established an acceptable level of output for its members.  Workers who over produced were branded “rate busters,” and under producers were labeled “chiselers.” To be accepted by the group, workers produced at the accepted level.  As they approached this acceptable level of output, workers slacked off to avoid overproducing.

Other studies, including an interview program involving several thousand workers, led Mayo and his associates to conclude that human behaviour was much more important in the workplace than researchers had previously believed.  In the lighting experiment, for example, the results were attributed to the fact that both groups received special attention and sympathetic supervision for perhaps the first time.  The incentive pay plans did not work in determining output because wage incentives were less important to the individual workers than was social acceptance.  In short, individual and social processes played a major role in shaping worker attitudes and behaviour.

Human Relations

The human relations movement, which grew from the Hawthorne studies and was a popular approach to management for many years, proposed that workers respond primarily to the social context of the workplace, including social conditioning, group norms, and interpersonal dynamics. A basic assumption of the human relations movement was that the manager’s concern for workers would lead to their increased satisfaction, which would in turn result in improved performance. Two writers who helped advance the human relations movement were Abraham Maslow and Douglas McGregor.  In 1943, Maslow advanced a theory suggesting that people are motivated by a hierarchy of needs, including monetary incentives and social acceptance.  Maslow’s hierarchy is perhaps the best-known human relations theory.

Meanwhile, Douglas McGregor’s Theory X and Theory Y model best represents the essence of the human relations movement.  According to McGregor, Theory X and Theory Y reflect two extreme belief sets that managers have about their workers. Theory X is a relatively negative view of workers and is consistent with the views of scientific management. Theory Y is more positive and represents the assumptions that human relations advocates make.  In McGregor’s view, Theory Y was a more appropriate philosophy for managers to adhere to. Both Maslow and McGregor notably influenced the thinking of many practicing managers.

Theory X Assumptions

  1. People do not like work and try to avoid it.
  2. People do not like work, so managers have to control, direct, coerce, and threaten

employees to get them to work towards organisational goals.

  1. People prefer to be directed, to avoid responsibility, and to want security; they have little ambition.

Theory Y Assumptions

  1. People do not naturally dislike work; work is a natural part of their lives.
  2. People are internally motivated to reach objectives to which they are committed.
  3. People are committed to goals to the degree that they receive personal rewards when they reach their objectives.
  4. People will both seek and accept responsibility under favourable conditions.
  5. People have the capacity to be innovative in solving organisational problems.
  6. People are bright, but under most organisational conditions their potentials are underutilised.

Contemporary Behavioural Science in Management

Munsterberg, Mayo, Maslow, McGregor, and others have made valuable contributions to management. Contemporary theorists, however, have noted that many assertions of the human relationists were simplistic and inadequate descriptions of work behaviour.  Current behavioural perspectives on management, known as organisational behaviour, acknowledge that human behaviour in organisations is much more complex than the human relationists realised.  The field of organisational behaviour draws from a broad, inter-disciplinary base of psychology, sociology, anthropology, economics, and medicine.

Organisational behaviour takes a holistic view of behaviour and addresses individual, group, and organisational processes. These processes are major elements in contemporary management theory.  Important topics in this field include job satisfaction, stress, motivation, leadership, group dynamics, organisational politics, interpersonal  conflict, and the structure and design of organisations.

Assessment of the Behavioural Perspective

The primary contributions of the behavioural perspective relate to ways in which this approach has changed managerial thinking.  Managers are now more likely to recognise the importance of behavioural processes and to view employees as valuable resources instead of mere tools. On the other hand, organisational behaviour is still imprecise in its ability to predict behaviour and is not always accepted or understood by practicing managers. Hence, the contributions of the behavioural school have yet to be fully realised.

management, leadership, management training

Organizing is that part of managing which involves establishing an intentional structure of roles for people to fill in the organization

5. Strategic management and organisational goals and understanding the key concepts

One of the most vitally important aspects of the management process involves strategic management.  Strategic management is the process by which an organisation develops and implements plans that espouse the goals and objectives of that organisation. The process of strategic management is a continuous one that changes as the organisational goals and objectives evolve. Small businesses engage in strategic management to ensure that they adapt to trends and external changes such as globalisation. Several key concepts characterise strategic management and the development of organisational goals. BOTI’s  leadership training programs for managers, leadership training workshops and leadership management courses will introduce you to the realms of strategic management and set you on your way to understanding this vitally important management concept.

Goal Setting

At the core of the strategic management process is the creation of goals, a mission statement, values and organisational objectives. Organisational goals, the mission statement, values and objectives guide the organisation in its pursuit of strategic opportunities. It is also through goal setting that managers make strategic decisions such as how to meet sales targets and achieve higher revenue generation. Through goal setting, organisations plan how to compete in an increasingly competitive and global business arena.

Analysis Strategy Formation

Analysis of an organisation’s strengths and weaknesses is a key concept of strategic management. Other than the internal analysis, an organisation also undertakes external analysis of factors such as emerging technology and new competition. Through internal and external analysis, the organisation creates goals and objectives that will turn weaknesses into strengths. These analyses also facilitate in strategising ways of adapting to changing technology and emerging markets.

Strategy Formation

Strategy formation is a concept that entails developing specific actions that will enable an organisation to meet its goals and objectives. Strategy formation entails using the information from the analyses, prioritising and making decisions on how to address key issues facing the organization. Additionally, through strategy formulation an organisation seeks to find ways of maximising profitability and maintaining a competitive advantage.

Strategy Implementation

Strategy implementation is putting the actual strategy into practice to meet organisational goals and objectives. The idea behind this concept is to gather all the available and necessary resources required to bring the strategic plan to life. Organisations implement strategies through creating budgets, programs and policies to meet financial, management, human resources and operational goals and objectives. For the successful implementation of a strategic plan, cooperation between management and other employees is absolutely necessary.

Strategy Monitoring

A final concept is monitoring of the strategy once it has been implemented. Strategy monitoring entails evaluating the strategy to determine if it yields the anticipated results as espoused in the organisational goals. Here, an organisation determines what areas of the plan to measure and the methods of measuring these areas, and then compares the anticipated results with the actual ones. Through monitoring, an organisation is able to understand when and how to adjust the plan to adapt to changing trends.

management. leadership, management training

Management is a systematic way of doing things

6. Strategic plans and the implementation process 

Effective implementation of strategic plans is essential for any organisation’s success.  Among recommended procedures are getting started early and creating consensus around the goals and objectives of strategic plans.

Effective implementation of strategic plans is essential to the success of any organisation, but it is not as simple as it looks. A 2018 management research study concluded that only 20 to 30 percent of corporate strategic plans are ever completed. For smaller businesses, it may just be inexperience with seeing them through.

Getting Started Early

Broad agreement exists among leadership and management professionals that implementation needs to begin as the strategic plan is created. Getting started early does several things: It introduces implementation language and concepts into corporate life in time for both to become a familiar and well-understood.

Commitment and Consensus

Getting employees, especially key personnel, to buy into the plan – to become fully committed to it early on – is essential. The implementation process begins with communicating the plan throughout the organisation. It needs to be made clear that the plan is consistent with the organisation’s vision and general business strategy and that the plan has broad approval from the board of directors to department managers. A frequent issue with the implementation of strategic plans is that middle managers, absent some clear and timely reinforcement to the contrary, often conclude that senior management no longer cares about implementing the plan. Another issue is that only about a quarter of corporations provide meaningful incentives for meeting strategic plan benchmarks and goals.

Paying the Costs

Nearly all strategic plans come with a cost. Yet, most strategic plans are rolled out without any direct connection to budgeting. An unfunded strategic plan is only a wishlist. Implementation requires an understanding of plan costs and institutional commitment to its funding. Plans need to come with funding in place.

Relation to External Conditions

Every strategic plan is responsive to external conditions, directly or indirectly. Changes in external conditions – the economy, supply costs, labor or other issues – can make the plan’s implementation unnecessary, no longer strategic or impossible to achieve. Acknowledgment of these parameters should be built into the plan’s rollout so that everyone knows that the plan includes responses to external conditions.

Every plan has objectives, but not all plans contain enough information about achieving them. Two common deficiencies are:

  • Establishment of benchmarks
  • Establishment of oversight practices

Establishing benchmarks and oversight practices are closely related. Oversight confirms that benchmarks are being achieved according to schedule. The presence of monitoring activities also sends employees a message that the plan is still in place and remains important.

Building in Updates and Revisions

One way of ensuring that a strategic plan continues to be relevant is to build periodic reviews of all the plan’s essential features into the implementation of the plan: goals, benchmarks and monitoring. A plan shouldn’t be evergreen; it needs to be viewed as a contemporary document. Strategic plans work best when they are time-limited, with a major review, often with a new rollout, at least once a year.

  • Here are some known issues with plan implementations:
    • Lack of reinforcement of long-term goals
    • Strategic plans treated as separate from daily operations
    • Plans that are overwhelming and need to be pruned to be made achievable
    • Insufficient progress reports: Achievement of benchmarks always needs to be noted.
    • Employees not given sufficient authority to implement the plan
    • Employees not given sufficient means to implement the plan

Tip

  • Using one of the strategic plan conception and implementation templates available on the internet removes a lot of uncertainty and makes it easier to benchmark and monitor plan progress. Some are free in exchange for your contact information; others have either a one-time fee or a monthly charge.
management, leadership, management training

Management is an integrated process

7. The Importance of Business Implementation and implementation strategies

Implementation

Whether a business is a start-up or already well established, business implementation becomes the responsibility of all the employees. Implementation is the process of executing a plan or policy so that a concept becomes a reality. To implement a plan properly, managers should communicate clear goals and expectations, and supply employees with the resources needed to help the company achieve its goals.  When you enrol on one of BOTI’s business courses, management training courses or management skills training courses you will discover so much more.

The implementation of a plan brings about change meant to help improve the company or solve a problem. The changes can occur to policies, management structures, organizational development, budgets, processes, products or services. Since the status quo can be detrimental to a company, change can help improve the work environment and/or the customer experience.

Organizational Development

Part of good organizational development involves including all employees in implemented changes. When a company shares its ideas and goals with workers, the workers will feel a sense of ownership and loyalty to the company, as well as feel included in something important that is larger than their respective job descriptions. Making workers feel valued also helps maintain or improve employee retention. Communicating goals to employees helps encourage participation and can give a plan a strong start.

Increased Cooperation

When executed properly, business implementation can increase interdepartmental cooperation. It can be easy for a department within a business to work independently and only rely on another department when a need arises, particularly in a large company. Business implementation helps unite departments, open the lines of communication, create a diverse culture within the organization and increase efficiency and productivity. Successful business implementation links performance factors with projects designed to develop and optimize individual and departmental activities.

Clear Priorities

As well as communicating goals, business implementation sets clear priorities. Priorities are generally based on due dates, client needs, financial concerns, worker needs or logistics. Deadlines help guarantee the implementation of a plan with realistic due dates, but a company must provide its workers with clear action steps and resources to ensure the success of the plan. Failure to communicate priorities can cause inefficiencies, miscommunications, worker frustration and low morale. When priorities or deadlines are realistic, employees feel as if a company is setting them up for success.

Moving Forward

Business implementation is important for moving a company forward. When a business fails to implement and execute its strategies properly, it fails to move forward and grow. According to website Business Balls, to implement and execute a plan successfully, there must be “motivational leadership,” a plan of action and “performance management.”

management, leadership, management training

Organizing is that part of managing which involves establishing an intentional structure of roles for people to fill in the organization

Business Implementation Strategies

To increase the effectiveness of new business ideas, you need to have efficient business implementation strategies. Formulating creative business ideas does you little good if you do not have a plan in place to properly execute them. In addition, a business’s organizational structure is strengthened when management spends time analyzing different ways to efficiently put new plans into place.

Get Staff and Management Involved

A business idea can start with any member of the staff, but getting the company to accept the implementation of a new idea requires the entire staff to be involved in some way with the planning. It is not necessary to take input from every individual, but you can get departmental managers involved in the process from the beginning, especially concerning how any major changes will affect their departments. These managers can then reach out to their staff and get the company involved in the implementation strategy, widening your scope and perspective in the process.

Invest in Training

To implement any new business idea effectively, invest in training at every phase of the process. For instance, at least 60 days prior to implementing a new business idea, training should focus on alerting your staff to the pending change then introduce how such changes will benefit the company. Continue training throughout the implementation period, and be prepared to take input from your employees as to how you can make the process smoother.

Consider Outside Factors

Implementing a new idea for your business could affect your vendors or customers. As you plan your implementation strategy, consider how any change, big or small, will affect the entities you do business with. Targeted market research of your clients and vendors can give you an indication of how your changes will affect business before you even implement them. Discuss your ideas with your largest vendors or clients to determine if you need to make any alterations to your plans.

Open Communication

Implementing change is easier if you allow free and open communication within your organization. Encourage employees to give their input about your proposed changes, and maintain an open communication policy throughout the implementation process.

How to create and implement a business plan

You won’t have to re-invent the wheel when you create a business plan for a new venture — many organisations offer tips, advice and even sample plans you can use to get started. To find out all you need to know about how to create and implement a business plan enrol now on one of BOTI’s business courses, business management short courses or management skills training courses.  Many institutions provide step-by-step instructions for writing business plans. To increase your chances for success, create a dynamic plan you can modify and update as you run your business. 

Basic guidelines for creating a business plan

1. Write an outline for your business plan. Start with broad sections, such as a company mission statement, product or service description, customer profile, competitor analysis, marketing, financial, staffing and legal concerns. Create sub-headings. For example, under marketing, you will include branding, advertising, public relations and promotions. Under advertising, you can list print, broadcast, outdoor, direct mail, social media and other forms of online marketing and any other appropriate methods. Under financial, include startup funding, cash-flow projections and the details of your budget.

2. Research each section to find expert advice on each. Include information such as how you will conduct market research or develop customer demographics. When creating your market research section, discuss what information you will need, what questions you will ask, how you will ask those questions or administer surveys and what your costs are likely to be.

3. Meet with an accountant to review your income and expense numbers, budget, record keeping and taxes. Meet with an attorney to make sure you address all permits and licenses you will need, and any health, safety or labour laws you will need to follow.

4. Create a dynamic business plan by providing several scenarios. For example, start with the current costs of goods you will need to buy to make your product or service, then add one or two more budgets based on those prices going up. For example, a restaurant might experience an increase in produce if there’s a drought or freeze, or labor, if the worker pool is seasonal, aging or leaving the area.  A business plan is not static and should be a work-in-progress.

5. Write an executive summary of the plan and place it at the beginning of the document. This will give potential investors and lenders an overview of the business plan and the results you expect. The executive summary should not contain any support for your statements — save that for the body of the plan.

6. Implement the plan by starting at the beginning and executing the various steps you’ve addressed in the plan. For example, you might need to incorporate your company, trademark your name, secure business licenses and permits, open a bank account, get a post office box and perform many other tasks that get you ready to open your doors. This will include more complicated actions, such as shopping for vendors, hiring staff, developing marketing materials and creating promotions.

7. Review your business plan on a regular basis. Compare budgeted numbers to actual figures of doing business. Determine whether you can keep operating as you are, of if you need to make changes, such as reducing costs, raising prices or increasing marketing activities.

Management is a systematic way of doing things

 

Engage in a range of speaking/signing and listening interactions for a variety of purposes

Engage in a range of speaking/signing and listening interactions for a variety of purposes

(This Unit Standard course is aligned to: General Education and Training Certificate:  Business Practice)

SAQA I.D. 61755 NQF Level: NQF Level 01

Unit Standard: 119635

Number of credits:  6

Introduction

BOTI offers courses to improve communication skills, english for business communication and business communication skills training.  Reserve your seat now on BOTI’s Unit Standard course:  Engage in a range of speaking/signing and listening interactions for a variety of purposes.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

Course outline

This unit standard will enable you to interact orally/in signing with others in various contexts and situations for a variety of purposes. Learners will be able to communicate reasonably confidently through developing an understanding of how listening and speaking/signing strategies and skills can improve understanding between individuals and in groups.

 

Prior learning requirements

Listening, Speaking/Signing Reading Viewing and Writing/Signing skills at ABET 3 or equivalent.

 

Unit standard range

This standard covers Speaking/Signing and Listening in defined oral/signed interactions in socio-cultural, learning and workplace situations, in both formal and informal contexts for a variety of purposes. Broadly, the settings and situations in which learners perform their oral/signing ability are similar across levels. What differs is the extent and complexity of the vocabulary and grammatical structures that they bring to the task, as well as an increasing level of clarity, fluency and confidence.

Specific range statements are provided in the body of the unit standards where they apply to particular specific outcomes or assessment criteria.

Contexts include:

  • Civil society
  • Media contexts
  • Gender and race contexts
  • Historical, social and political contexts
  • Institutional contexts
  • Workplace/industry contexts
  • Personal relations and interpersonal relations
  • One to one, in a small or large group, with an audience, by telephone (not applicable to deaf learners).Content includes:
  • Knowledge (e.g. related to social conditions, human experiences, human rights, workplace issues, learning experiences)
  • Aesthetics (e.g. appreciation of the artistic elements, innovative use of language in consumer society (eg slogans, logos, marketing techniques))
  • Relationships (e.g workplace interactions, group interactions, personal interactions, social sensibility, power relations) > Emotions (e.g sympathy, empathy, identification, rejection)Text types include:Oral/signed or spoken texts at this level include narrative, persuasive, factual and everyday/information texts; texts may be of mixed types. Examples of received oral/signed or spoken/signed texts are conversations, speeches, report backs, instructions, directions, descriptions, prepared talks, lectures, interviews, stories.

 

BOTI offers courses to improve communication skills, english for business communication and business communication skills training.  Reserve your seat now on BOTI’s Unit Standard course:  Engage in a range of speaking/signing and listening interactions for a variety of purposes.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

 

Course outcomes

  • Show a critical awareness of language use in oral/signed texts.

 

  • Identify the purpose, audience and context of the communication.
  • Use strategies to engage with meaning and organisation in communication.
  • Use and respond to aesthetic, emotive, cultural and social aspects of oral/signed texts.
  • Use speaking/signing and listening strategies.

 

Engage in a range of speaking/signing and listening interactions for a variety of purposes

SAQA I.D. 62755 NQF Level: NQF Level 01

Unit Standard:  119635

Course duration

3 days

 

BOTI offers courses to improve communication skills, english for business communication and business communication skills training.  Reserve your seat now on BOTI’s Unit Standard course:  Engage in a range of speaking/signing and listening interactions for a variety of purposes.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

 

Who should attend:  Describe, interpret and represent mathematical problems, functions and algebra in different contexts course

This course is aimed at individuals who wish to enhance their basic business skills.

 

**Quote does not include Any Exam Fees (if applicable)

IMPORTANT ACTION: Do Not Wait To Improve Your Skills.  

Book Now By Completing Online Booking Form / Customised Proposal or Obtain Approval For Your Already Received Customised Proposal

 

QUALIFICATIONS UTILISING THIS UNIT STANDARD:

 

  ID QUALIFICATION TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL STATUS END DATE PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QA FUNCTIONARY
Core 61755 General Education and Training Certificate: Business Practice Level 1 NQF Level 01 Reregistered 2023-06-30 SERVICES

BOTI also offers:  Describe, interpret and represent mathematical problems, functions and algebra in different contexts

Describe and represent objects in terms of shape, space and measurement

Use generic functions in a Graphic User Interface (GUI) environment

 

BOTI offers courses to improve communication skills, english for business communication and business communication skills training.  Reserve your seat now on BOTI’s Unit Standard course:  Engage in a range of speaking/signing and listening interactions for a variety of purposes.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Further Education and Training Certificate: Business Administration Services

Qualification Title: Further Education and Training Certificate: Business Administration Services

SAQA I.D. 61595 NQF Level: NQF Level 04 Credits: 140

Course duration: 6 contact days over 3 months per unit standard module

This is an accredited qualification

Want to learn more about what is administration and administration and management? Book your seat now on BOTI’s Further Education and Training Certificate in Business Administration Services or enrol on one of our business administration courses today.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

Want to learn more about what is administration and administration and management? Book your seat now on BOTI’s Further Education and Training Certificate in Business Administration Services or enrol on one of our business administration courses today.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

“The office is your oyster”

What you will learn

The Core Component of this course provides you with the knowledge and skills in the Management of Records, Comprehension of written and verbal texts, Business Writing, Problem Solving, Ethics, Cultural Awareness, Self Management and Self Development, Project Teamwork and Business Policies and Procedures.

The Qualification through its Elective Component will enable you to specialize in areas of Administration such as Reception, Executive Administration, Financial Literacy, Relationship Management, Legal Knowledge, Communication, Project Administration and Support, Call Centre Administration and Human Resources.

Want to learn more about what is administration and administration and management? Book your seat now on BOTI’s Further Education and Training Certificate in Business Administration Services or enrol on one of our business administration courses today.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

This course offers you the opportunity to pursue the following types of careers:

·        Secretarial services

·        Reception services

·        Switchboard operations

·        Financial Administration

·        Banking Administration

Want to learn more about what is administration and administration and management? Book your seat now on BOTI’s Further Education and Training Certificate in Business Administration Services or enrol on one of our business administration courses today.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

·        Personal/executive assistant services

·        Technical assistance

·        Typing

·        Data capturing

·        Systems administration

Want to learn more about what is administration and administration and management? Book your seat now on BOTI’s Further Education and Training Certificate in Business Administration Services or enrol on one of our business administration courses today.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

·        Human Resources administration

·        Basic Contracts Administration

·        Legal Secretarial services

·        Reception supervision

·        Change administration and management

·        Relationship management

·        Project coordination.

Want to learn more about what is administration and administration and management? Book your seat now on BOTI’s Further Education and Training Certificate in Business Administration Services or enrol on one of our business administration courses today.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

Course outcomes

Upon completion of this course you will effective be able to:

  • Achieve personal effectiveness in the business environment
  • Analyse new developments reported in the media that could impact on a business sector or industry
  • Apply the budget function in a business unit
  • Comply with organisational ethics
  • Contract service providers
  • Describe and apply the management of stock and fixed assets in a business unit

Want to learn more about what is administration and administration and management? Book your seat now on BOTI’s Further Education and Training Certificate in Business Administration Services or enrol on one of our business administration courses today.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

  • Describe and assist in the control of fraud in an office environment
  • Develop administrative procedures in a selected organization
  • Display cultural awareness in dealing with customers and colleagues
  • Manage administration records
  • Manage service providers in a selected organization
  • Present information in report format
  • Work as a project team member

Want to learn more about what is administration and administration and management? Book your seat now on BOTI’s Further Education and Training Certificate in Business Administration Services or enrol on one of our business administration courses today.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

  • Apply efficient time management to the work of a department/division/section
  • Accommodate audience and context needs in oral communication
  • Interpret a variety of literary texts
  • Interpret and use information from texts
  • Write texts for a range of communicative contexts

Want to learn more about what is administration and administration and management? Book your seat now on BOTI’s Further Education and Training Certificate in Business Administration Services or enrol on one of our business administration courses today.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

  • Apply knowledge of statistics and probability to critically interrogate and effectively communicate findings on life related problems
  • Engage in sustained oral communication and evaluate spoken texts
  • Measure, estimate and calculate physical quantities and explore, critique and prove geometrical relationships in 2 and 3 dimensional space in the life and workplace of adult with increasing responsibilities
  • Read analyse and respond to a variety of texts Use mathematics to investigate and monitor the financial aspects of personal, business, national and international issues

Want to learn more about what is administration and administration and management? Book your seat now on BOTI’s Further Education and Training Certificate in Business Administration Services or enrol on one of our business administration courses today.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

  • Use the writing process to compose texts required in the business environment
  • Write for a wide range of contexts
  • Apply knowledge of self and team in order to develop a plan to enhance team performance
  • Co-ordinate meetings, minor events and travel arrangements
  • Process incoming and outgoing telephone calls

 

Who is this course suitable for?

This course is for any individual who is or wishes to be involved in the Administration function within any industry, or non-commercial venture/organization. It is also the building block to advance the learner into the National Certificate in Business Administration Services: NQF Level 5.

You might also like:

Executive Assistant, Personal Assistant and/or Administrator Training Development Course

 

Join one of many office administration short courses

 

Want to learn more about what is administration and administration and management? Book your seat now on BOTI’s Further Education and Training Certificate in Business Administration Services or enrol on one of our business administration courses today.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

UNIT STANDARDS:

 

ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
Core 110021 Achieve personal effectiveness in business environment Level 4 NQF Level 04 6
Core 13943 Analyse new developments reported in the media that could impact on a business sector or industry Level 4 NQF Level 04 10
Core 13941 Apply the budget function in a business unit Level 4 NQF Level 04 5
Core 10022 Comply with organisational ethics Level 4 NQF Level 04 4
Core 14552 Contract service providers Level 4 NQF Level 04 3
Core 13945 Describe and apply the management of stock and fixed assets in a business unit Level 4 NQF Level 04 2
Core 110026 Describe and assist in the control of fraud in an office environment Level 4 NQF Level 04 4
Core 110003 Develop administrative procedures in a selected organisation Level 4 NQF Level 04 8
Core 7791 Display cultural awareness in dealing with customers and colleagues Level 4 NQF Level 04 4
Core 110009 Manage administration records Level 4 NQF Level 04 4
Core 109999 Manage service providers in a selected organisation Level 4 NQF Level 04 5
Core 110023 Present information in report format Level 4 NQF Level 04 6
Core 10135 Work as a project team member Level 4 NQF Level 04 8
Core 15234 Apply efficient time management to the work of a department/division/section Level 5 Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 4
Fundamental 8968 Accommodate audience and context needs in oral communication Level 3 NQF Level 03 5
Fundamental 8972 Interpret a variety of literary texts Level 3 NQF Level 03 5
Fundamental 8969 Interpret and use information from texts Level 3 NQF Level 03 5
Fundamental 8970 Write texts for a range of communicative contexts Level 3 NQF Level 03 5
Fundamental 9015 Apply knowledge of statistics and probability to critically interrogate and effectively communicate findings on life related problems Level 4 NQF Level 04 6
Fundamental 8974 Engage in sustained oral communication and evaluate spoken texts Level 4 NQF Level 04 5
Fundamental 12417 Measure, estimate & calculate physical quantities & explore, critique & prove geometrical relationships in 2 and 3 dimensional space in the life and workplace of adult with increasing responsibilities Level 4 NQF Level 04 4
Fundamental 8975 Read analyse and respond to a variety of texts Level 4 NQF Level 04 5
Fundamental 7468 Use mathematics to investigate and monitor the financial aspects of personal, business, national and international issues Level 4 NQF Level 04 6
Fundamental 12153 Use the writing process to compose texts required in the business environment Level 4 NQF Level 04 5
Fundamental 8976 Write for a wide range of contexts Level 4 NQF Level 04 5
Elective 13912 Apply knowledge of self and team in order to develop a plan to enhance team performance Level 3 NQF Level 03 5
Elective 13929 Co-ordinate meetings, minor events and travel arrangements Level 3 NQF Level 03 3
Elective 7790 Process incoming and outgoing telephone calls Level 3 NQF Level 03 3
Elective 10140 Apply a range of project management tools Level 4 NQF Level 04 8
Elective 243298 Apply administrative skills and knowledge in a sport organisation Level 4 NQF Level 04 11
Elective 12154 Apply comprehension skills to engage oral texts in a business environment Level 4 NQF Level 04 5
Elective 12155 Apply comprehension skills to engage written texts in a business environment Level 4 NQF Level 04 5
Elective 243296 Apply values and ethics to a sport organisation Level 4 NQF Level 04 3
Elective 117865 Assist and support learners to manage their learning experiences Level 4 NQF Level 04 5
Elective 15227 Conduct skills development administration in an organisation Level 4 NQF Level 04 4
Elective 243303 Create, improvise and organize sport activities Level 4 NQF Level 04 6
Elective 242668 Demonstrate knowledge and application of the Occupational Health and Safety Act, 85 of 1993 (OHSA) (as amended) and the responsibilities of management in terms of the Act Level 4 NQF Level 04 4
Elective 10324 Describe features, advantages and benefits of a range of products or services Level 4 NQF Level 04 6
Elective 377160 Explain the fundamentals of the concepts of ‘wellness’ Level 4 Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L4 8
Elective 377162 Explain the need for wellness awareness programmes Level 4 Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L4 4
Elective 14319 Explore strategies to retain or expand existing business in the insurance/investment industry Level 4 NQF Level 04 3
Elective 12544 Facilitate the preparation and presentation of evidence for assessment Level 4 NQF Level 04 4
Elective 10331 Identify and analyse customer and market related trends impacting on Contact Centres Level 4 NQF Level 04 10
Elective 10026 Identify expertise and resources Level 4 NQF Level 04 3
Elective 10023 Identify internal and external stakeholders Level 4 NQF Level 04 4
Elective 10139 Implement project administration processes according to requirements Level 4 NQF Level 04 5
Elective 10980 Induct a new employee Level 4 NQF Level 04 6
Elective 10388 Interpret basic financial statements Level 4 NQF Level 04 3
Elective 117156 Interpret basic financial statements Level 4 NQF Level 04 4
Elective 243300 Lead a community sport activity Level 4 NQF Level 04 12
Elective 7869 Maintain a preventative maintainance programme Level 4 NQF Level 04 3
Elective 242840 Make oral presentations Level 4 NQF Level 04 2
Elective 242810 Manage Expenditure against a budget Level 4 NQF Level 04 6
Elective 13443 Manage service providers in a micro-lending institution Level 4 NQF Level 04 5
Elective 7836 Monitor customer satisfaction Level 4 NQF Level 04 3
Elective 242819 Motivate and Build a Team Level 4 NQF Level 04 10
Elective 10983 Participate in the implementation and utilisation of equity related processes Level 4 NQF Level 04 5
Elective 114738 Perform financial planning and control functions for a small business Level 4 NQF Level 04 6
Elective 9244 Plan and conduct meetings Level 4 NQF Level 04 4
Elective 7825 Process financial transactions Level 4 NQF Level 04 16
4
Elective 10978 Recruit and select candidates to fill defined positions Level 4 NQF Level 04 10
Elective 242817 Solve problems, make decisions and implement solutions Level 4 NQF Level 04 8
Elective 8607 Support event co-ordination Level 4 NQF Level 04 20
Elective 116927 Apply the principles of employment equity to organisational transformation Level 5 Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 10
Elective 114274 Demonstrate and apply an understanding of the Basic Conditions of Employment Act (Act 75 of 1997) Level 5 Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 8
Elective 114278 Demonstrate and apply an understanding of the Labour Relations Act (Act 66 of 1995) Level 5 Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 12
Elective 263976 Demonstrate understanding of the outcomes-based education and training approach within the context of a National Qualifications Framework Level 5 Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 5
Elective 11907 Draft an employment contract Level 5 Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 3
Elective 10171 Manage the capture, storage and retrieval of human resources information using an information system Level 5 Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 3
Elective 10149 Support the project environment and activities to deliver project objectives Level 5 Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 14

 

LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION:

The Public Finance Management Act – let’s make it simple

The Public Finance Management Act – let’s make it simple

BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.  Want to know more about the intricacies of the Public Finance Management Act, pfma act, and what a code of good practice entails?  Click here to book your seat on BOTI’s  Public Finance Management Act Course

When it comes to government entities and the laws, rules and regulations that surround them it is often a daunting prospect to even attempt to try to understand how they operate and what impact they have on business and the country as a whole.

A concise and informative digest of the Public Finance Management Act

This article is a concise and informative digest of the Public Finance Management Act, no. 1 of 1999 (with amendments included.)

This is a simplified version of what the Public Finance Management Act is all about.

BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.  Want to know more about the intricacies of the Public Finance Management Act, pfma act, and what a code of good practice entails?  Click here to book your seat on BOTI's

What does the Public Finance Management Act entail?

Essentially, The Public Finance and Management Act is responsible for regulating the management of finances in national and provincial government.

The Act Public Finance Act also sets out the procedures for efficient and effective management of all revenue, expenditure, assets and liabilities.  Part of its purpose is to establish the duties and responsibilities of government officials in charge of finances.

The Public Finance Act also aims to secure transparency, accountability and sound financial management in government and public institutions.

BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.  Want to know more about the intricacies of the Public Finance Management Act, pfma act, and what a code of good practice entails?  Click here to book your seat on BOTI’s  Public Finance Management Act Course

The Public Finance Management Act clarifies the laws

The Public Finance Management Act clarifies the laws in relation to the National and Provincial Treasuries, the National and Provincial Revenue Funds and the National Budgets.

It also governs the management of finance in departments and public entities such as Eskom and Telkom, Parliament, the provincial legislatures and constitutional instutions such as the Human Rights Commission, the Commission on Gender Equality and the Independent Broadcasting Authority.

BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.  Want to know more about the intricacies of the Public Finance Management Act, pfma act, and what a code of good practice entails?  Click here to book your seat on BOTI’s  Public Finance Management Act Course

The National Treasury and Revenue Fund

The National Treasury, consisting of the Minister of Finance and national departments, which is responsible for financial and fiscal matters, is the main body that oversees the implementation of the Public Finance Management Act.

The Treasury promotes the national government’s fiscal policy framework

The Treasury promotes the national government’s fiscal policy framework and monitors provincial budgets in government departments and other institutions to which the Act applies.

BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.  Want to know more about the intricacies of the Public Finance Management Act, pfma act, and what a code of good practice entails?  Click here to book your seat on BOTI’s  Public Finance Management Act Course

Norms and standards

The responsibility of the Treasury is also to prescribe norms and standards and has the right to investigate any system of financial management in any department, public entity or constitutional institution.

Submission of annual financial statements

The National Treasury submits annual financial statements for auditing to the Auditor-General with respect to the following bodies:

  • National departments
  • Constitutional institutions
  • The South African Reserve Bank (SARB)
  • The Auditor-General
  • Parliament

BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.  Want to know more about the intricacies of the Public Finance Management Act, pfma act, and what a code of good practice entails?  Click here to book your seat on BOTI’s  Public Finance Management Act Course

Tabling in Parliament

Once the statements have been audited, they are consolidated and submitted to Parliament for tabling in both houses.

This process must be made public, and the National Treasury may publish financial statistics in respect of all spheres of government in the Government Gazette.

The National Treasury is also in charge of the National Revenue Fund, into which money received by the national government must be paid which includes most money paid to the government, although there are certain exclusions.  No unauthorised money may be withdrawn from the fund.

The South Africa Revenue Service (SARS)

SARS (South African Revenue Service) must also deposit all taxes, levies, duties and fees into a Revenue Fund and may only withdraw money to refund a person or organisation.

Only the National Treasury may withdraw money (and this must be authorised) from the National Revenue Fund.

The Minister of Finance may authorise the use of money for emergency purposes in exceptional circumstances, but these may not exceed two percent of the total amount appropriated in the national budget.

BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.  Want to know more about the intricacies of the Public Finance Management Act, pfma act, and what a code of good practice entails?  Click here to book your seat on BOTI’s  Public Finance Management Act Course

Provincial Treasuries and Revenue Funds

Provincial treasuries, consisting of the MEC for finance in and the provincial departments responsible for finance in that province, work much like the national treasury, but on a provincial level.

Provincial treasuries are responsible for the preparation and control of the provincial budgets and oversee the implementation of this Act within their respective provinces.

A provincial treasury must prepare and submit financial statements for their departments, for public entities that fall under their control, and for the provincial legislature. The consolidated financial statements must be made public.

BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.  Want to know more about the intricacies of the Public Finance Management Act, pfma act, and what a code of good practice entails?  Click here to book your seat on BOTI’s  Public Finance Management Act Course

 

The provincial treasury is also in charge of the provincial revenue funds for its province

The provincial treasury is also in charge of the provincial revenue fund for its province, and, as with the national treasury, no unauthorised money may be withdrawn from provincial revenue funds.

All money paid to provincial government must be deposited into the revenue fund, apart from certain exclusions.

The national treasury has the right to withdraw any exclusions paid into the Provincial Revenue Funds, as long as it first consults with the provincial treasury concerned. Other than the national treasury, only provincial treasuries are allowed to withdraw money (and only if the withdrawal is authorised).

BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.  Want to know more about the intricacies of the Public Finance Management Act, pfma act, and what a code of good practice entails?  Click here to book your seat on BOTI’s  Public Finance Management Act Course

Funds for emergency situations

As with the National Treasury, provincial treasuries are allowed to withdraw funds for emergency situations.  However, these may not exceed two percent of the total amount appropriated in the annual provincial budget.

Such withdrawals must be reported to the Auditor-General and the provincial legislature and they must be attributed to a vote.

 

National and Provincial Budgets

The Minister of Finance must table the annual budget and multi-year budget projections for the financial year for the National Assembly, and the MEC for finance in each province must table the provincial annual budget as well as multi-year budget projections for the national legislature.

Budgets set out estimated revenue and expenditure for the year or over a period of years.

BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.  Want to know more about the intricacies of the Public Finance Management Act, pfma act, and what a code of good practice entails?  Click here to book your seat on BOTI’s  Public Finance Management Act Course

What is a multi-year budget projection?

Multi-year estimates ensure good financial planning.  They are estimates of revenue and expenditure for an upcoming period of years, and they must take account of macro-economic projections.

There are limits to the amount of funds that may be withdrawn before a budget has been passed.

Subject to conditions such as unforeseeable financial events, the Minister of Finance may adjust the budget from time to time, if and when necessary. Similarly, the provincial MEC for Finance may also adjust the provincial budget.

Reports on the state of the budget must be published in the Government Gazette each month

Reports on the state of the budget must be published in the Government Gazette each month, and, at least four times a year, the provincial treasury must submit a statement of revenue and expenditure to the National Treasury.

The relevant treasury may withhold funds from a department if the funds are for a service that is taken over by another department, and any new draft legislation that gives a provincial department a new function must take account of the costs of that function and include an estimated projection of costs in the draft.

BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.  Want to know more about the intricacies of the Public Finance Management Act, pfma act, and what a code of good practice entails?  Click here to book your seat on BOTI's

BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.  Want to know more about the intricacies of the Public Finance Management Act, pfma act, and what a code of good practice entails?  Click here to book your seat on BOTI’s  Public Finance Management Act Course

Accounting Officers

All departments and constitutional institutions must appoint an accounting officer to ensure that money is managed effectively, efficiently and transparently.  The accounting officer ensures that resources are used economically and that assets are looked after.

The accounting officer maintains an internal audit system

The accounting officer also maintains an internal audit system and a system for evaluating projects.  In general, the accounting officer keeps the finances of the department or institution in order.  This does not beam that an accounting officer may enter into financial ventures that have not been approved.

Accounting officers must keep full and proper records

In terms of the Public Finance Management Act, accounting officers must keep full and proper records of the financial affairs of the department or institution and are required to prepare and submit detailed financial statements to the Auditor-General and comprehensive annual reports and statements to the relevant treasury.

BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.  Want to know more about the intricacies of the Public Finance Management Act, pfma act, and what a code of good practice entails?  Click here to book your seat on BOTI’s  Public Finance Management Act Course

The Accounting Standards Board

The Accounting Standards Board must prepare and publish the standards of generally recognized accounting practice for the financial statements with respect to the following:

  • Departments
  • Public entities
  • Constitutional institutions
  • Municipalities and boards, commissions, funds or other entities under municipal ownership
  • Parliament
  • Provincial legislatures

Local and international best practice accounting practices count

The standards must take into account local and international best practice accounting practices and the capacity of institutions.

BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.  Want to know more about the intricacies of the Public Finance Management Act, pfma act, and what a code of good practice entails?  Click here to book your seat on BOTI’s  Public Finance Management Act Course

Public Entities

Range of accountability

All public entities listed in Schedule 2 and Schedule 3, which is subject to change by the Minister, must appoint a person or body who will be held accountable for the purposes of this Act.

The accounting authority, which is either a board or other controlling body or a CEO, must protect the assets and records of the public entity and must do everything possible to prevent damage to the financial interests of the State.

Fidelity, honesty, integrity and in the bests interests of the public entity

Accounting officers must always act with fidelity, honesty, integrity and in the best interests of the public entity.

Accounting authorities who represent Schedule 2 public entities must submit an annual budget and corporate plan to the accounting officer.

These documents must show a projection of expected revenue and expenditure and any activity plans for the next three years.

BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.  Want to know more about the intricacies of the Public Finance Management Act, pfma act, and what a code of good practice entails?  Click here to book your seat on BOTI’s  Public Finance Management Act Course

Accounting officers who represent Schedule 3 public entities that are not government business enterprises must submit a budget of estimated revenue and expenditure to the executive authority.

BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.  Want to know more about the intricacies of the Public Finance Management Act, pfma act, and what a code of good practice entails?  Click here to book your seat on BOTI's

BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.  Want to know more about the intricacies of the Public Finance Management Act, pfma act, and what a code of good practice entails?  Click here to book your seat on BOTI’s  Public Finance Management Act Course

Seeking approval from the relevant treasury

Public entities must seek approval from the relevant treasury before carrying out any of the following:

  • Setting up a company or starting or ending an important business activity,
  • Participating in an important partnership, joint venture or trust or changing the nature of an existing interest in a partnership or trust; and
  • Acquiring or doing away with a significant shareholding in a company or a significant asset.

BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.  Want to know more about the intricacies of the Public Finance Management Act, pfma act, and what a code of good practice entails?  Click here to book your seat on BOTI’s  Public Finance Management Act Course

Fair representation of the state of affairs

The accounting authority of a public entity must keep full and proper financial records of the affairs of the company and must submit statements for auditing, either to the Auditor-General or by a registered external auditor.

An annual report, fairly representing the state of affairs of the entity must also be submitted to the executive authority.

BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.  Want to know more about the intricacies of the Public Finance Management Act, pfma act, and what a code of good practice entails?  Click here to book your seat on BOTI’s  Public Finance Management Act Course

It is the accounting officer’s responsibility to ensure that unauthorised spending does not occur

 

Executive authorities who direct an accounting officer of a public entity to do something that will have financial implications for a department must set out the instruction in writing. It is the accounting officer’s responsibility to ensure that unauthorised spending does not occur.

BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.  Want to know more about the intricacies of the Public Finance Management Act, pfma act, and what a code of good practice entails?  Click here to book your seat on BOTI’s  Public Finance Management Act Course

Loans, guarantees and other commitments

The institutions to which the Public Finance Management Act applies may not borrow money or enter into any transaction that binds them financially, unless it is authorised by the Act or some other law.

If it is permissible to enter into a binding transaction and financial interactions may only be conducted through the following persons:

  • For Government:  Only the Minister may act on behalf of the National Revenue Fund, and only the MEC for finance in a province may act on behalf of a provincial revenue fund.
  • For Schedule 2 public entities: Only the accounting authority can borrow money or conduct binding transactions.
  • For a national government business enterprise listed in Schedule 3:  Only the accounting authority and the action must be authorised in the national Government Gazette by the Minister of Finance.
  • For a provincial government business enterprise listed in Schedule 3. Only the Minister of Finance or a Cabinet Minister who is the executive authority of the entity (with the approval of the Minister).

 

Ministerial approval

Any other public entities require the approval of the Minister of Finance or, where relevant, the Cabinet Minister who is the executive authority for the public entity.

Permission required from the Minister of Finance

Constitutional institutions and provincial public entities can only borrow money with the permission of the Minister of Finance, and then only for bridging purposes and up to a prescribed limit.

BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.  Want to know more about the intricacies of the Public Finance Management Act, pfma act, and what a code of good practice entails?  Click here to book your seat on BOTI’s  Public Finance Management Act Course

Treasury Regulations

The National Treasury issues regulations concerning financial management for the institutions to whom the Public Finance Management Act applies. These regulations cover issues such as the recovery of losses and damages and gifts or donations by or to the State, as well as any matter prescribed for departments in terms of this Act.

Such are published in the Government Gazette and are made available on the National Treasury website.

 

Offences

The Minister of Finance must set up systems for dealing with financial misconduct and criminal charges.

Criminal offences include the following:

  • Willful or gross negligence on the part of an accounting officer
  • Willful or gross negligence on the part of an accounting authority; and
  • unauthorised loans or entering into a binding financial contract without permission on behalf of a department, public entity or constitutional institution.

Those found guilty will be subject to a fine or a term of imprisonment

If a person is found guilty, they will be liable to a fine or imprisonment for a period of up to five years.

BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.  Want to know more about the intricacies of the Public Finance Management Act, pfma act, and what a code of good practice entails?  Click here to book your seat on BOTI’s  Public Finance Management Act Course

 

You may also like these courses: People Management: Labour Relations & Law, Employment Equity Course

Labour Relations & Law Fundamentals Course

Leadership Short Course in South Africa, Cape Town, Johannesburg, Durban Programmes

 

You might also like these articles:  Getting to grips with the Labour Relations Act of South Africa – all you need to know about how it operates

Get up to speed on the Media Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority “MICT SETA”

Get to know the ins and outs of what Services SETA is all about

Understanding the links in Supply Chain Management

Achieve a level of comfort – understand how to assign the correct NQF level to your range of experience

 

Get up to speed on the Media Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority “MICT SETA”

Get up to speed on the Media Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority “MICT SETA”

Media Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority “MICT SETA” in a nutshell

Affectionately known as “MICT SETA” The Media, Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority was established in terms of the Skills Development Act, 1998 (Act No. 97 of 1998).   As a SETA, The MICT sector comprises five sub-sectors that although they are interconnected they remain distinct in themselves as well as identifiable in their own right.   The following sub-sectors make up the MICT sector:

  • Advertising
  • Film and Electronic Media
  • Electronics
  • Information Technology
  • Telecommunications

Get up to speed on the Media Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority “MICT SETA”

Prevailing statistics and trends

  • The MICT sector currently involves over 21,000 companies spread across the five sub-sectors (which have been allocated to the MICT SETA through the SARS registration process).

 

  • Almost 50% of the sector employer base is constituted by organisations involved in Information Technology, which is followed by Telecommunications at 15% and Electronics at 13%; while the Film and Electronic Media and Advertising sub-sectors represent 12% each.

 

  • Of South Africa’s provinces, Gauteng claims the largest share of employers at 43%, which is followed by the Western Cape and Kwazulu-Natal with 11% and 8% respectively. According to the analysis of WSPs submitted in 2016, there were 297,831 people employed, which showed an upward trend from 274,095 based on 2015 WSP submissions.

 

  • In 2016, the Information Technology sub-sector had the highest percentage of employees with 49%, whereas the Advertising sub-sector had the lowest; with approximately 4% of employees.

The Information Technology sub-sector is further divided into Information Communication Technologies (ICT) producing activities and ICT using activities and lies at the convergence between content, commerce, community and the tools that support them.

The Information Technology sub-sector covers an array of segments, including news, market research, business process automation, media, data services, software, hardware, telecoms, financial and risk information security and many others.

The Information Technology sub-sector is anchored by the role of unified communications which enable access, storage, transmission and manipulation of information.

 

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

 

The Information Technology sub-sector continues to grow into one of South Africa’s leading providers of employment opportunities

The Information Technology sector continues to grow from a nascent industry into one of the country’s leading providers of employment opportunities and is a major contributor to the country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

A number of stakeholders contribute to the MICT Sector policy and regulatory environment

A number of stakeholders contribute to the MICT Sector policy and regulatory environment including industry and employer bodies, professional bodies and regulatory bodies.

In this sector, professional associations advance professional learning and knowledge in the whilst organised labour’s focus is centred around the labour rights of workers.

The MICT SETA partners with industry, Universities and TVET colleges, public as well as private, in the delivery of respective learning programmes in an attempt to address identified scarce skills.  Its commitment to expand and improve the provision of skills development for SMMEs and rural communities will immeasurably contribute towards addressing the requisite skills.

One of the main priorities of the MICT SETA is to ensure credibility of the data used for skills planning and partnering with stakeholders in scoping their skills development, leading towards effective implementation of demand-driven learning programmes that serve as practical bridges into the workplace.

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

 

Vision and Mission

Vision
To be recognised as the leader in the development of a highly skilled knowledge-based information society.
Mission
The MICT SETA generates, facilitates and accelerates the processes of quality skills development at all levels in the MICT sector.

 

Values

‘As an organisation and individuals within the organisation we value honesty and integrity;

We are eager to take on challenges and see them through;

We have a passion for developing people; and

We hold ourselves accountable to our customers and partners by honouring commitment and striving to ensure quality service delivery in line with Batho-Pele principles.’

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

 

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

Learnerships

What is a learnership?

Essentially, a learnership is a work-based education and training programme that is linked to a qualification which is registered on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) with the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA).

Learnerships are occupationally directed programmes that consist of both structured theoretical learning and practical workplace experience.

Benefits of learnerships

For the learner learnerships provide:

·         Easy access to learning

·         Increased access to employment opportunities

·         Assistance with career-pathing and self-development

·         A monthly stipend to learners while they learn

·         Opportunities that lead to the acquisition of a formal qualification

·         Fast tracking of the development of current employees

·         An entrance into the industry for unemployed learners.

For the employer, learnerships provide:

·         Skilled and experienced workers

·         Development of competent staff

·         Empowerment credentials and BB-BEE points for the company

·         Knowledgeable and competent employees who require less supervision

·         Improved workplace productivity and quality outcomes

·         A vehicle to address employment equity targets

·         Assistance in helping to fill identified skills gaps

For the Industry, learnerships:

·         Assist with helping to compete in the global marketplace

·         Build a pool of skilled, qualified and more professional workers

·         Develop their people to achieve a world-class standard of operation

 

The participants in a learnership


There are three main participants in a learnership:

·         The learner/s

·         The training provider/s

·         The employer/s

 

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

 

Learnership application process

Even though the SETA facilitates the recruitment and implementation of learnerships, the responsibility to recruit learners lies with the employer, the service provider as well as the training provider.  MICT SETA encourages stakeholders who are implementing learning programmes to search the MICT SETA placement database for candidates.   For more details visit the MICT SETA website at www.mict.org.za.

 

Sector Skills Planning

Sector Skills Planning ensures:

  • Development of credible labour market information systems
  • Input into the Organising Framework of Occupations
  • Ad-hoc research in support of skills planning
  • An accurate list of scarce and critical skills
  • Approval and registration of Skills Development Facilitators
  • Review of the on-line grant system
  • Annual update of the SDF Manual and SDF training workshops and roadshows
  • Development of the WSP/ATR submission template
  • Timeous submission of WSPs/ATRs
  • Evaluation and approval of submitted WSPs/ATRs
  • WSPs/ATRs monitoring and evaluation
  • Payment of Mandatory Grants

 

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

 

Inter-SETA transfers

Workplace Skills Plan (WSP)

A Workplace Skills Plan (WSP) is a document that articulates how the employer plans to address staff training and development needs in the workplace.

In order to remain competitive, organisations need to search for the best possible training solutions as an investment in staff career-pathing when implementing annual skills development plans.

Remaining abreast of industry trends and maintaining relevance is therefore pivotal when bridging gaps between present realities within organisations, their skills development needs and the career aspirations of employees.

Skills development is vital in South Africa, especially in the long term.

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

Annual Training Report (ATR)

An Annual Training Report (ATR) is a record of training and development undertaken over the past year and how it relates to the actual training and development plans.   Every organisation that submitted a WSP is required to submit an ATR towards the end of each year that records the training and development that was implemented.

Records of all education, training and development activities should be available to confirm the information in the report.

 

Inter-SETA Transfer

An Inter-SETA Transfer (IST) is processed due to:

  • The organisation having registered with the incorrect SETA
  • The organisation’s core business having changed since the previous registration and now better suits the industrial code of another SETA
  • The organisation falling within the jurisdiction of more than one SETA. The entire process may take up to six months

 

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

 

Scarce Skills

Occupations or positions within the organisation in which there is a scarcity of qualified and experienced people, currently or anticipated in the future, either:

  • Because such skilled people are not available or
  • They are available but do not meet employment criteria.

 

Absolute scarcity

Absolute scarcity is the term used to describe a situation whereby suitably skilled people are not available, for example:

  • A new or emerging occupation, i.e. there are few, if any, people in the country with the requisite skills, qualifications and experience and education and training providers have yet to develop learning programmes to meet the skills requirements.

 

  • Firms, sectors and even the country itself are unable to implement planned growth strategies and are experiencing productivity, service delivery and quality problems directly attributable to a lack of skilled people.

 

  • Replacement demand scarcity where there are no people enrolled or engaged in the process of acquiring the skills that need to be replaced.

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

 

Relative Scarcity

Relative scarcity occurs when suitably skilled people are available but do not meet other employment criteria, for example:

  • Geographical location, i.e. people unwilling to work outside of urban areas.
  • Equity considerations, i.e. there are few if any candidates with the requisite skills, qualifications and experience from specific groups available to meet the skills requirements of firms and enterprises.
  • Replacement demand would reflect a relative scarcity if there are people in education and training (formal as well as workplace based) who are in the process of acquiring the necessary skills,

qualifications and experience but where the lead time will mean that they are not available in the short term to meet replacement demand.

 

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

 

Critical Skills

Critical Skills are Specific key or generic skills within an occupation. In the South African context there are two groups of critical skills:

  • Key or generic skills which would include cognitive skills, problem solving, language and literacy skills, mathematical skills, ICT skills and working in teams.
  • Particular occupation specific skills required for performance within that occupation to fill a “skills gap” that might have arisen as a result of changing technology or new forms of work within an

organisation. Identifying Scarce Skills against Current Occupations Scarce and critical skills are identified by gathering and analysing information in respect of:

  • Hard-to-fill vacancies or long-term vacancies:

In 2014, when compared to 41 other countries surveyed, South Africa came in 4th from the bottom, with only 8% of employers reporting difficulty filling jobs. However, in 2015, the country has come in at 30th place, with 31% of employers reporting difficulty filling jobs – close on the global average of 38%. Reasons for this include the following:

  • No appropriately qualified people available, e.g. new occupation, new qualification required.
  • No appropriately experienced people available, e.g. qualification is available but experience and application in the work place is a key employer requirement.
  • No appropriately qualified and/or experienced people are available from target groups e.g. female telecom network engineers.
  • Sourcing skills from abroad: Where there is hard or anecdotal evidence that key employers in the sector are recruiting skilled workers outside of the country to fill specific occupations.
  • Higher wages: Where there is hard or anecdotal evidence that the lack of skilled people has resulted in skilled workers demanding higher wages or employers paying a premium for skill.
  • Lower productivity levels: Where enterprises or sub-sectors are reporting that scarce or critical skills shortages are being reflected in lower quality, productivity or service delivery measures. For example, there is greater wastage, more machine down-time, more mistakes, greater need for supervision, more work having to be redone to correct mistakes.
  • Lower productivity growth: Where within enterprises, sub-sectors, sectors and even nationally there is less expenditure on innovation, R&D, less product or service value added
  • The OFO has been introduced to simplify and standardise the categorisation of occupations. The OFO is a skill-based coded classification system, which encompasses all occupations in the South African context.
  • The OFO serves as a key tool for identifying, reporting and monitoring skills demand and supply in the South African labour market.
  • The OFO sets the base for linking various occupations to specific skills and assists in identifying further training needs.
  • The OFO is a skill-based classification system, which encompasses all occupations in the South African context.
  • The classification of occupations is based on a combination of skill levels and skill specialisation which makes it easy to locate a specific occupation within the framework

 Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

 

The learnership process

Each party to the learnership process has rights and responsibilities.  Such agreement is then lodged with the MICT SETA, assuring the provision of a quality learnership programme. Should any one party not fulfil their requisite responsibilities, an appeal can be made to the MICT SETA. The MICT SETA formally registers all learnership agreements to maintain a register of learner credits. A mentor/coach is assigned to monitor the learner’s progress in the workplace, whilst a registered assessor evaluates the progress of theoretical components.

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

Unemployed learners receive a monthly allowance, as laid down by the Basic Conditions of Employment of the Department of Higher Education and Training.  Please also refer to the Sectoral Determination No.5, Skills Development Act and associated regulations. Visit the Department of Higher Education and Training website (www.dhet.org.za). Employed learners are governed by the Terms and Conditions of their existing employment contract.

Learnerships can be performed at several levels on the NQF, with level 1 being Adult Basic Education and level 8 being the equivalent to a Masters or Doctorate degree.  Learners participating in a learnership programme receive credits for every unit standard successfully completed.  There is no minimum entry requirement for learnerships – all learnerships are appropriate for people of all levels of education.

 

Who is eligible to apply for a learnership?

Only employers can apply for learnerships to be implemented.  Individuals can become involved through an employer.

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

Graduate Internship

An internship is a programme designed to give all FET College and university graduates an opportunity to extend their academic qualifications through workplace exposure and specialised training. Participants are placed on a full-time basis, for a period of eight to twelve months, in stakeholder companies and government organisations. The purpose of this is to provide the learner with workplace experience that enhances their qualification.

 

Work integrated learning internship

Work integrated training is offered to students from the universities of technology who are required to complete their P2 activities in a workplace, following an institution prescribed logbook. Participants are employed on a contract basis for workplace integrated learning in order to ensure that they are able to complete their diplomas.

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

Reasons why learners should participate in an internship

The primary benefit for the graduate learner includes obtaining real-world workplace experience and:

  • To fast track high-level skills development;
  • To offer unemployed graduates with needed work experience; and
  • To empower graduates with practical experience, appropriate to their qualification.

 

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

 

Benefits of participating in an internship

Graduates receive valuable workplace experience.

 

Who exactly participates in an internship?

Either employed or unemployed people can get involved in an internship, however, the MICT SETA focuses mainly on unemployed graduates. The internship usually involves the learner as a potential employee to a company; and the potential employer. Taking note of the learner’s level of education, capabilities and experience, the employer defines the workplace programme that must be completed in order for the learner to obtain the required skills for the work to be performed within the company. This workplace programme is reviewed with the learner and both parties must agree to the final programme.  In certain circumstances, the learner may need to undergo additional specialised training.  In this instance, the training provider could become a third party to the internship agreement. On completion of the learnership, the intern will receive a certificate of recognition.

What to bear in mind when applying for an internship

It again must be reiterated that it is the employer who applies for an internship and not the employee.

www.mict.org.za www.mictseta.net.za

 

BOTI Accreditations

[insert page=’seta-accreditation’ display=’content’]

 

 

 

 

Strategic plans – the implementation process

“leadership and management courses – general management courses – executive leadership training programmes”   Book now and read on!

Strategic plans – the implementation process –

leadership and management courses – general management courses – executive leadership training programmes   Book now and read on!

Effective implementation of strategic plans is essential for any organisation’s success.  Among recommended procedures are getting started early and creating consensus around the goals and objectives of strategic plans.

Effective implementation of strategic plans is essential to the success of any organisation, but it is not as simple as it looks. A 2018 management research study concluded that only 20 to 30 percent of corporate strategic plans are ever completed. For smaller businesses, it may just be inexperience with seeing them through. Enrol now on one of BOTI’s leadership and management courses – general management courses – executive leadership training programmes!

leadership and management courses, general management courses and executive leadership training programmes

You will discover so much more when you enrol on one of BOTI’s leadership and management courses, general management courses and executive leadership training programmes!

Getting Started Early

Broad agreement exists among leadership and management professionals that implementation needs to begin as the strategic plan is created. Getting started early does several things: It introduces implementation language and concepts into corporate life in time for both to become a familiar and well-understood.

Commitment and Consensus

Getting employees, especially key personnel, to buy into the plan – to become fully committed to it early on – is essential. The implementation process begins with communicating the plan throughout the organisation. It needs to be made clear that the plan is consistent with the organisation’s vision and general business strategy and that the plan has broad approval from the board of directors to department managers. A frequent issue with the implementation of strategic plans is that middle managers, absent some clear and timely reinforcement to the contrary, often conclude that senior management no longer cares about implementing the plan. Another issue is that only about a quarter of corporations provide meaningful incentives for meeting strategic plan benchmarks and goals.

You will discover so much more when you enrol on one of BOTI’s leadership and management courses, general management courses and executive leadership training programmes!

Paying the Costs

Nearly all strategic plans come with a cost. Yet, most strategic plans are rolled out without any direct connection to budgeting. An unfunded strategic plan is only a wishlist. Implementation requires an understanding of plan costs and institutional commitment to its funding. Plans need to come with funding in place.

Relation to External Conditions

Every strategic plan is responsive to external conditions, directly or indirectly. Changes in external conditions – the economy, supply costs, labor or other issues – can make the plan’s implementation unnecessary, no longer strategic or impossible to achieve. Acknowledgment of these parameters should be built into the plan’s rollout so that everyone knows that the plan includes responses to external conditions.

You will discover so much more when you enrol on one of BOTI’s leadership and management courses, general management courses and executive leadership training programmes!

Establishing Benchmarks

Every plan has objectives, but not all plans contain enough information about achieving them. Two common deficiencies are:

  • Establishment of benchmarks
  • Establishment of oversight practices

Establishing benchmarks and oversight practices are closely related. Oversight confirms that benchmarks are being achieved according to schedule. The presence of monitoring activities also sends employees a message that the plan is still in place and remains important.

Building in Updates and Revisions

One way of insuring that a strategic plan continues to be relevant is to build periodic reviews of all the plan’s essential features into the implementation of the plan: goals, benchmarks and monitoring. A plan shouldn’t be evergreen; it needs to be viewed as a contemporary document. Strategic plans work best when they are time-limited, with a major review, often with a new rollout, at least once a year.

 

TipYou will discover so much more when you enrol on one of BOTI’s leadership and management courses, general management courses and executive leadership training programmes.

  • Here are some known issues with plan implementations:
    • Lack of reinforcement of long-term goals
    • Strategic plans treated as separate from daily operations
    • Plans that are overwhelming and need to be pruned to be made achievable
    • Insufficient progress reports: Achievement of benchmarks always needs to be noted.
    • Employees not given sufficient authority to implement the plan
    • Employees not given sufficient means to implement the plan

Tip

  • Using one of the strategic plan conception and implementation templates available on the internet removes a lot of uncertainty and makes it easier to benchmark and monitor plan progress. Some are free in exchange for your contact information; others have either a one-time fee or a monthly charge.

You will discover so much more when you enrol on one of BOTI’s leadership and management courses, general management courses and executive leadership training programmes.

Upcoming Public Courses
Leadership Mastering Emotional Intelligence, Refining Interpersonal Skills & Dealing with Conflict Resolution

There are no upcoming events at this time. Leadership and Problem Solving
There are no upcoming events at this time. Closing Gaps between Supervisor and New Manager
There are no upcoming events at this time. New Manager and Middle Manager
There are no upcoming events at this time. Senior & Executive Manager
There are no upcoming events at this time. Book Now! View Calendar for the latest course

Management Perspectives

leadership and management courses, executive leadership training programs or leadership development programs – BOTI offers business training across South Africa.

Management Perspectives

leadership and management courses, executive leadership training programs or leadership development programs – book now!

Assessment of the Classical Perspective

leadership and management courses, executive leadership training programs or leadership development programs -The classical perspective served to focus serious attention on the importance of effective management and helped pave the way for later theories and approaches.  Many of the concepts developed during this era, such as job specialisation, time and motion studies and scientific methods are still in use. On the other hand, these early theorists often took an overly simplistic view of management and failed to understand the human element of organisations.  Upskill yourself when you enrol on one of BOTI’s leadership and management courses, executive leadership training programs or leadership development programs.

leadership and management courses, executive leadership training programs or leadership development programs

 

 

Upskill yourself when you enrol on one of BOTI’s leadership and management courses, executive leadership training programs or leadership development programs!

The Behavioural Management Perspective

Early advocates of the classical management perspective essentially viewed organisations and jobs from a mechanistic point of view – that is, they essentially sought to conceptualise organisations as machines and workers as cogs within those machines. Even though many early writers recognised the role of individuals, these management pioneers tended to focus on how managers could control and standardise the behaviour of their employees.  In contrast, the behavioural management perspective placed much more emphasis on individual attitudes and behaviours.

Upskill yourself when you enrol on one of BOTI’s leadership and management courses, executive leadership training programs or leadership development programs!

The behavioural management perspective was stimulated by a number of writers and theoretical movements. One of those movements was industrial psychology, the practice of applying psychological concepts to industrial settings.  Hugo Munsterberg (1863-1916), a noted German psychologist, is recognised as the father of industrial psychology.  He suggested that psychologists could make valuable contributions to managers in the areas of employee selection and motivation. Industrial psychology is still a major course of study at many colleges and universities.  Another early advocate of the behavioural approach to management was Mary Parker Follett.  Follett worked during the scientific management era, but quickly came to recognise the human element in the workplace.  Indeed, her work clearly anticipated the behavioural management perspective, and she appreciated the need to understand the role of human behaviour in organisations.  Her specific interests were in adult education and vocational guidance. Follett believed that organisations should become more democratic in accommodating employees and managers.

Upskill yourself when you enrol on one of BOTI’s leadership and management courses, executive leadership training programs or leadership development programs!

The Hawthorne Studies

Although Munsterberg and Follett made major contributions to the development of the behavioural approach to management, its primary catalyst was a series of studies conducted near Chicago at Western Electric’s Hawthorne plant between 1927 and 1932.

The research, originally sponsored by General Electric, was conducted by Elton Mayo and his associates. The first study involved manipulating illumination for one group of workers and comparing their subsequent productivity with the productivity. of another group whose illumination was not changed.  Surprisingly, when illumination was increased for the experimental group, productivity went up in both groups.  Productivity continued to increase in both groups, even when the lighting for the experimental group was decreased. Not until the lighting was reduced to the level of moonlight did productivity begin to decline (and General Electric withdrew its sponsorship).  Another experiment established a piecework incentive pay plan for a group of nine men assembling terminal banks for telephone exchanges.  Scientific management would have predicted that each man would try to maximize his pay by producing as many units as possible.  Mayo and his associates, however, found that the group itself informally established an acceptable level of output for its members.  Workers who over produced were branded “rate busters,” and under producers were labeled “chiselers.” To be accepted by the group, workers produced at the accepted level.  As they approached this acceptable level of output, workers slacked off to avoid overproducing.

Other studies, including an interview program involving several thousand workers, led Mayo and his associates to conclude that human behaviour was much more important in the workplace than researchers had previously believed.  In the lighting experiment, for example, the results were attributed to the fact that both groups received special attention and sympathetic supervision for perhaps the first time.  The incentive pay plans did not work in determining output because wage incentives were less important to the individual workers than was social acceptance.  In short, individual and social processes played a major role in shaping worker attitudes and behaviour.

 

Upskill yourself when you enrol on one of BOTI’s leadership and management courses, executive leadership training programs or leadership development programs!

Human Relations

The human relations movement, which grew from the Hawthorne studies and was a popular approach to management for many years, proposed that workers respond primarily to the social context of the workplace, including social conditioning, group norms, and interpersonal dynamics. A basic assumption of the human relations movement was that the manager’s concern for workers would lead to their increased satisfaction, which would in turn result in improved performance. Two writers who helped advance the human relations movement were Abraham Maslow and Douglas McGregor.  In 1943, Maslow advanced a theory suggesting that people are motivated by a hierarchy of needs, including monetary incentives and social acceptance.  Maslow’s hierarchy is perhaps the best-known human relations theory.

Meanwhile, Douglas McGregor’s Theory X and Theory Y model best represents the essence of the human relations movement.  According to McGregor, Theory X and Theory Y reflect two extreme belief sets that managers have about their workers. Theory X is a relatively negative view of workers and is consistent with the views of scientific management. Theory Y is more positive and represents the assumptions that human relations advocates make.  In McGregor’s view, Theory Y was a more appropriate philosophy for managers to adhere to. Both Maslow and McGregor notably influenced the thinking of many practicing managers.

 

Theory X Assumptions

  1. People do not like work and try to avoid it.
  2. People do not like work, so managers have to control, direct, coerce, and threaten

employees to get them to work towards organisational goals.

  1. People prefer to be directed, to avoid responsibility, and to want security; they have

little ambition.

 

Theory Y Assumptions

  1. People do not naturally dislike work; work is a natural part of their lives.
  2. People are internally motivated to reach objectives to which they are committed.
  3. People are committed to goals to the degree that they receive personal rewards when they reach their objectives.
  4. People will both seek and accept responsibility under favourable conditions.
  5. People have the capacity to be innovative in solving organisational problems.
  6. People are bright, but under most organisational conditions their potentials are underutilised.

 

Upskill yourself when you enrol on one of BOTI’s leadership and management courses, executive leadership training programs or leadership development programs!

Contemporary Behavioural Science in Management

Munsterberg, Mayo, Maslow, McGregor, and others have made valuable contributions to management.  Contemporary theorists, however, have noted that many assertions of the human relationists were simplistic and inadequate descriptions of work behaviour.  Current behavioural perspectives on management, known as organisational behaviour, acknowledge that human behaviour in organisations is much more complex than the human relationists realised.  The field of organisational behaviour draws from a broad, inter-disciplinary base of psychology, sociology, anthropology, economics, and medicine.

Organisational behaviour takes a holistic view of behaviour and addresses individual, group, and organisational processes. These processes are major elements in contemporary management theory.  Important topics in this field include job satisfaction, stress, motivation, leadership, group dynamics, organisational politics, interpersonal  conflict, and the structure and design of organisations.

Upskill yourself when you enrol on one of BOTI’s leadership and management courses, executive leadership training programs or leadership development programs!

Assessment of the Behavioral Perspective

The primary contributions of the behavioural perspective relate to ways in which this approach has changed managerial thinking.  Managers are now more likely to recognise the importance of behavioural processes and to view employees as valuable resources instead of mere tools. On the other hand, organisational behaviour is still imprecise in its ability to predict behaviour and is not always accepted or understood by practicing managers. Hence, the contributions of the behavioural school have yet to be fully realised.

Upskill yourself when you enrol on one of BOTI’s leadership and management courses, executive leadership training programs or leadership development programs!

Upcoming Public Courses
Leadership Mastering Emotional Intelligence, Refining Interpersonal Skills & Dealing with Conflict Resolution

There are no upcoming events at this time. Leadership and Problem Solving
There are no upcoming events at this time. Closing Gaps between Supervisor and New Manager
There are no upcoming events at this time. New Manager and Middle Manager
There are no upcoming events at this time. Senior & Executive Manager
There are no upcoming events at this time. Book Now! View Calendar for the latest course

 

 

Managing key health and safety training aspects, develop your skills with a safety management course – an absolute must in today’s workplace

Managing key health and safety training aspects, develop your skills with a safety management course – an absolute must in today’s workplace

BOTI’s safety management course programmes are designed to introduce you to and familiarise you with all aspects of occupational health and safety where it pertains to the general workplace as well as more industrial type settings, illustrating how this important aspect affects us all.  In a nutshell, this article seeks to explore and discuss managing the various aspects of health and safety as they affect the workplace and how these impact employees and their productivity levels.  We examine key aspects of maintaining business health from an often ignored, yet vitally important aspect of managing a successful business.

safety management course

Manage and control key health and safety training aspects

It is vitally important to take the lead and manage all your health and safety training needs.  BOTI’s Safety Management course programmes will save you time, effort and money.   It’s sad but true that over 200 people are killed each year in accidents at work and over one million people are injured.

Enrol now on a safety management course with BOTI.  We offer business training courses across South Africa.  Book now!

BOTI’s safety management course programmes are designed to introduce you to and familiarise you with all aspects of occupational health and safety.

Reduce costs of PPE (Personal Protective Equipment)

Certain settings require the best form of protection one can get.  Understanding the key elements of how to draw up an asset management policy to cost effectively manage and control your PPE requirements is essential if you are involved in any form of business that requires this kind of protection for your staff.

When lightning strikes – Outdoor safety dos and don’ts

It is essential to be aware of the dos and don’ts regarding the basics of outdoor health and safety issues that are vital employee training requirements.

Incident reporting

Where promoting a culture of health and safety in the workplace is concerned, one of the most important aspects is to encourage employees to report incidents when they take place.  Doing so will ensure that hazards and risks in the working environment are rapidly dealt with before they can affect any other aspects of the business.  When such are not effectively handled the impact on the business could also negatively affect the with regards to legal risk.

Risk assessment

The importance of ensuring that business risk assessments are carried out in order to be compliant with the Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Act cannot be overemphasised.  It is also important to understand the difference between a danger, a hazard and a risk.

BOTI’s safety management course programmes are designed to introduce you to and familiarise you with all aspects of occupational health and safety.

What to do when your Health and Safety Representative has resigned – an effective hand-over plan

When your Health and Safety Representative suddenly resigns you need to have a clear and detailed hand-over plan in place.  In so doing your next elected Safety Representative will know exactly what is required on the job and the transition phase will not impact business productivity levels.

If illnesses are prevalent amongst employees take steps to improve ventilation in the workplace

If your employees are experiencing headaches, dizziness, sinus congestion, itchy or watery eyes, scratchy throats and also show an inability to concentrate, poor ventilation is most likely the cause.  Should this not be rectified in the proper manner hefty penalties as well as low productivity levels and increased incidents of sick leave can result.

There are key tasks that every Health and Safety Representative should endeavour to get right

When running a business it is important to improve the health and safety of the workplace, hence, for any system to run efficiently there are a number of tasks involved and health and safety is no exception.  However, important tasks are often overlooked or forgotten about and this is why a health and safety representative is needed in the first instance.   BOTI’s safety management course programmes will teach you everything you need to know about what these tasks involve.

Enrol now on a safety management course with BOTI.  We offer business traing courses across South Africa.  Book now!

Attention all construction and manufacturing companies!   – How do you measure up in terms of your health and safety audit?

There are a host of questions you and your employees need to answer in order to determine whether you are complying with the Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Act.  It is therefore essential to ask the right questions in order to measure your level of compliance and determine if any gaps need to be addressed and if so, take any steps required to bridge these gaps.

The importance of a sanitation risk assessment

If your employees are working in unhygienic conditions they are likely to contract any number of illnesses resulting from such conditions.  Such ailments as stomach viruses, breathing problems and intestinal infections may develop.  These are usually caused by certain types of bacteria that live and breed in damp, dirty, and generally unhygienic places.  When employees become ill what this ultimately means for the business is loss of productivity.  In light of this, the importance of hygiene in the workplace cannot be overemphasised and should at all times be given high priority.

BOTI’s safety management course programmes are designed to introduce you to and familiarise you with all aspects of occupational health and safety.

The importance of involving your Health and Safety Representative

As a business owner, you know what is best for your company.  No one can make important decisions about money, products and services, employees, of the way in which you embrace your markets the way you can.  However, when it comes to health and safety aspects you might need additional help.    The fact that as a business owner you are more likely to spend more time in the office as opposed to at the coalface,  you will not always see what your employees do which means that you need to enlist the support of your Health and Safety Representative to represent you in order to ensure that your employees remain protected at all times in the workplace.

BOTI’s safety management course programmes are designed to introduce you to and familiarise you with all aspects of occupational health and safety.  Book now!

Enrol now on a safety management course with BOTI.  We offer business training courses across South Africa.  Book now!

 

Upcoming Public Courses
Leadership Mastering Emotional Intelligence, Refining Interpersonal Skills & Dealing with Conflict Resolution

There are no upcoming events at this time. Leadership and Problem Solving
There are no upcoming events at this time. Closing Gaps between Supervisor and New Manager
There are no upcoming events at this time. New Manager and Middle Manager
There are no upcoming events at this time. Senior & Executive Manager
There are no upcoming events at this time. Book Now! View Calendar for the latest course

 

BOTi Courses Overview – Mastering Service Level Agreements and Contracts Training

Course Introduction

Many projects, processes and transactions in business involve the use of contracts. In a number of cases the individuals entrusted with implementing these activities are not consulted in setting up the contract or, if they are, they are not aware of the terms and conditions of the agreement until it is far too late. The terms and conditions of a contract can have a huge impact on the likelihood of meeting delivery expectations. Consequently, to help companies ensure that their employees understand contracts, BOTI is offering a training course on Business Contracts and SLAs.

Advantages of attending Mastering Service Level Agreements and Contracts

  • Risk Reduction.
  • Enforcement and ensuring contractual compliance to prevent breached and penalty clauses.
  • Productivity / operational effectiveness.
  • Forecasting is vastly improved with better data and analytics.
  • Financial Optimization – reduction in legal fees and and elimination of renewals of unwanted services and creates .
  • Spend Visibility.

Course Outline

  • Definition of what contract management is.
  • Contract types.
  • Contract elements.
  • Risks.
  • Breach of Contract & remedies.
  • Contract Termination.
  • Defining ethics and ethical breaches.
  • Contract management requests.
  • Tender Processes and impact on contracts: choosing potential bidders; RPF’s and technology; Calculating value; making a selection of preferred bidder.
  • How to formulate a contract.
  • Templates and software.
  • Compliance & wording.
  • Risks of non-compliance (penalty clauses, breach).
  • Contract negotiations (ensuring maximum value for your organisation).
  • Assessing performance.
  • Qualities of effective relationships & relationship pitfalls (ethics). Building trust & maintaining relationships.
  • Amending contracts; replacing clauses; describing amendments; amendment status.
  • Conducting audits and acting on results.
  • Reviewing contracts.
  • Confidentiality & Non-disclosure Agreements.
  • Dealing with contract performance and non-performance.
  • Arbitration & dispute resolution.
  • Payment terms & their financial implications.
  • Forward Cover.
  • Service Level Agreements (SLAs).

Course Duration

3 day/s

Who should attend

This course is intended for anyone involved in contract management.

  • Job Supervisors.
  • Contract Managers.
  • Operations Managers.
  • IT Managers.
  • Sales Managers.
  • Engineering Managers.
  • Procurement Personnel.
  • Project Co-ordinators.
  • Job Engineers.
  • Sales Teams.

Upcoming Public Courses

There are no upcoming events at this time. Book Now! View Calendar for the latest course

Please Phone Us Now To Speak to One of Our Friendly Consultants

Tel:011-882-8853

OR

FOR CELL PHONES CLICK TO CALL

Please Fill in the Form – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

Please Email Us Now  – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

 [email protected]

Don’t delay. Skill up at BOTi today.

BOTi – Get on Course.

Risk Assessment and Management Training – BOTi Advanced Course

Unmanaged Risk is a recipe for Business disaster.

Risk Assessment and Management Training: Course Introduction

Understanding, mitigating and managing risk is an essential part of business in our modern world.  While It is not possible to control and manage 100% of risk, knowing exactly how to prepare for it – before, during, and after an event will mitigate any harm. Making risk management part of your day to day business is essential to sustainable growth and ultimate business success.

Safety should be the first priority as every business must face the reality of risks as well as hazards. By utilizing our Risk Assessment and Management Program your delegates will be aware of hazards as well as any “hidden” risks  around their particular workplace. Identifying hazards by utilizing proper procedures provides your delegates the skills to prevent accident before they occurs. Limiting as well as removing potential dangers by utilizing Risk Assessment will be an incredible investment.

The purpose of risk assessment is to identify problems before they become hazards or risks. Enrol in a Risk Management Course (or Risk Management Training, Risk Management Courses South Africa, Risk Management Short Course or Risk Assessment Training)

Risk Assessment and Management Training: Course Outline

Welcome you to our Risk Assessment and Management workshop. we strongly advise participants of this workshop to attend the workshop on Safety In The Workplace. In this workshop the focus and objective will be on understanding hazards and risks and realizing where risks come from. If you have safety measures in place at your business – in writing, bring them along, we’ll show you how a risk plan is tailored to specific industries and we’ll give you the tools to update the safety measures at your company.

The second object of the workshop is to identify risk management techniques and outline a disaster recovery plan. A hazard is any source of harm to people or property. A risk is the chance of harm coming from a hazard. It is important to consult with employees during safety inspections and when introducing new plans or methods or equipment which may be a health hazard.

The purpose of risk assessment is to identify problems before they become hazards or risks.

When all is said and done, there are four ways to address risks in the workplace:

Reduce the risk.

This could include sprinkler systems with fire alarms or a security system.

Transfer the risk.

This is also called risk sharing and is often done in business relationships.

Avoid the risk.

This is not always possible and by avoiding the risk, the business avoids opportunities. Sometimes it is necessary to take the risk, the cost of the risk should be smaller than insuring or avoiding the risk. There is a hierarchy system when it comes to controlling risks. There are six basic types of control measures to limit or prevent risks.

Eliminate the risk.

This is the most favourable solution. Substitute, trade for a lesser risk. Isolate, limit access to the risk. Engineered controls, designs to prevent access to risks and hazards. Administrative controls, safe work practices and procedures. Protective equipment, personal protective equipment worn around hazards. Accident reports must be filled in by the supervisor and the employee, even if no medical help is needed. A doctor’s note must accompany the accident report. Every office building should have an emergency plan and an evacuation plan in place. We end off this workshop by discussing the benefits of having a Disaster Recovery Plan in place and we summarise risk assessment allowing you to answer the important questions, such as are our current control measures sufficient?

1. Introduction
Workshop objectives

2. Identifying risks and hazards
What is a hazard?
What is a risk?
Consult with employees
Likelihood scale
Case Study

3. Being proactive with problems (1)
Risks unique to your industry
Walk around
Short term and long term
Common issues
Case study

4. Being proactive with problems (2)
Ask questions
External events
Worst case scenarios
Consequence scale
Case study

5. Everybody’s responsibility
Report risks and hazards
Avoid unsafe conditions
Take appropriate precautions
Communicating to the whole business
Case Study

6. Tracking and updating control measures
Defining control measures
Business procedures
Deciding adequacy of control measures
Updating and maintaining risk measures
Case study

7. Risk Management techniques
Reduce the risk
Transfer the risk
Avoid the risk
Accept the risk
Case study

8. General office safety and reporting
Accident reports
Accident response plans
Emergency action plan
Training and education
Case study

9. Business impact analysis
Gathering information
Identify vulnerabilities
Analyse Information
Implement recommendations
Case study

10. Disaster recovery plan
Have a plan before you need one
Test, update and repeat
Hot, warm and cold sites
Keep documentation simple and clear
Case Study

11. Summary of risk assessment
Identifying hazards
Identifying who might be harmed
Examining current control measures
Changing control measures
Case study

12. Topics not discussed
Post workshop overview

Related Terms Include Risk Assessment Workshop, Enterprise Risk Management Courses, Risk Services, Financial Risk Management Courses, Risk Management And Compliance Courses, Enterprise Risk Management Courses South Africa, Risk Analysis Courses, Operational Risk Management Courses, Risk Workshop, Risk Assessment Training South Africa, Risk Management Courses Cape Town.

Risk Assessment and Management Course or Risk Management Course (or Risk Management Training, Risk Management Courses South Africa, Risk Management Short Course or Risk Assessment Training)

2 day/s

Risk Assessment and Management Course: Who should attend

Managerial course for senior management.

**Quote does not include Any Exam Fees (if applicable)

IMPORTANT ACTION: Do Not Wait To Improve Your Skills.  

Book Now By Completing Online Booking Form / Customised Proposal or Obtain Approval For Your Already Received Customised Proposal

 

Don’t delay. Skill up at BOTi Today.

 

Enrol in a Risk Management Course (or Risk Management Training, Risk Management Courses South Africa, Risk Management Short Course or Risk Assessment Training)

Health and Wellness at Work Training – BOTi Essential Course

BOTi Essential Course – Health and Wellness at Work Training : Course Introduction

It is a well known fact that  getting enough sleep, eating  healthily and  engaging in regular exercise all lead to a happier you both at home and in the workplace.     This course  includes useful  practical methods such as time management and decluttering  that will help you  achieve   a more balanced state.

In today’s modern workplace employees don’t just work for a pay check.   Most  companies  today not only invest in their employees in terms of skills but also in  respect of their physical and mental health.   Healthy employees make for productive employees.

We tackle several objectives in this course.  From assessing the needs of  employees  to planning a health and wellness program, to implementing the program then finally, how to maintain it.

We will cover the four most common health behaviour programs, such as increasing physical activity, nutrition and weight loss, tobacco cessation and substance abuse treatment.

BOTi Essential Course – Health and Wellness at Work  Training: Course Outline

  • Introduction

Workshop Objectives

  • Health and wellness program

Definition

Productivity

Cost of health care

Cost of Absenteeism

Case study

  • Types of programs

Health behaviours

Health screenings and maintenance

Mental health

Physical Injuries

Case study

  • Health Behaviour programs

Increasing physical activity

Nutrition and weight loss

Tobacco Cessation

Substance Abuse Treatment

Case study

  • Health Screenings and maintenance programs

Preventative care screenings

Cancer screenings

Annual Examinations

Maintenance Programs

Case Study

  • Mental health programs

Stress management

Support groups

Counselling

Awareness and education

Case Study

  • Evaluate the need

Review current and previous programs

Environmental Factors

Common health conditions

Company information for employee health

Case study

  • Planning process

Health and wellness team or committee

Define goals

Budget

Programs and policies

Case study

  • Implementation

Get management support

Test it out

Get the word out

Incentives

Case study

  • A culture of wellness

Accessible Healthy eating options

Give them a break

Alcohol, Drug and Smoke-Free Work Environment

Eliminate Hazards

Case Study

  • Evaluate Results

Check the Results

Employee Satisfaction

Revise plans as necessary

Share Achievements

Case study

  • Topics not discussed

Post workshop overview

 

BOTi Essential Course – Health and Wellness at Work  Training: Course Duration

1 day/s

 

BOTi Essential Course – Health and Wellness at Work Training : Who should attend

This course is intended for anyone who wants to improve their health and wellness at work.

**Quote does not include Any Exam Fees (if applicable)

 

IMPORTANT ACTION: Do Not Wait To Improve Your Skills.  

Book Now By Completing Online Booking Form / Customised Proposal or Obtain Approval For Your Already Received Customised Proposal

Don’t delay.  skill up at BOTi today!

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training – BOTi Essential Course

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training: Course Introduction

A business is nothing without it’s people. Human Resources are a key department in any established company. A in-depth understanding of a company’s human  capitol will, in no small part, be a decisive factor it’s ultimate success.

The face of Human Resources has changed drastically and it’s role has grown substantially in recent years, we offer this course (Human Resources Training, HR Courses) for all who need training in this key business area – Human Resource management.

 

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training: Course Outline

  1. Introduction

Understand Performance Reviews

Understand Labour Legislation

Deal With Disciplinary hearings

  1. Recruiting personnel

Active Recruitment

  1. Course Outcomes

Formulating Performance Standards

Establish Monitoring Systems

Preparing for Performance Review

Conducting Performance Review Interview

  1. Plan and Prepare for recruitment

Recruit applicants

Select staff

  1. Basic Conditions of Employment Act

Purpose and Application

Particulars of Employment

  1. Legal Proceedings

Understand legal proceedings according to the Act

Handle disciplinary hearings

Reach informed decisions

Related Terms include Human Resource Management Short Course, Labour Law Training South Africa, Human Resource Management Courses South Africa, Short Courses In Human Resources.

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training: Course Duration

2 day/s

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training Course: Who should attend

This course (Human Resources Training, HR Courses) is intended for those working in HR and Labour Relations.

**Quote does not include Any Exam Fees (if applicable)

IMPORTANT ACTION: Do Not Wait To Improve Your Skills.  

Book Now By Completing Online Booking Form / Customised Proposal or Obtain Approval For Your Already Received Customised Proposal

 

Don’t delay. Skill up at BOTi Today.

 

(Human Resources Training, HR Courses)

Effective Disciplinary Hearing Training – BOTi Essential Course

BOTi Essential Course – Effective Disciplinary Hearing Training

BOTi Essential Course – Effective Disciplinary Hearing Training: Course Introduction

A disciplinary hearing can be an emotional experience, yet, it needs to take place in a setting where emotions do not rule the game.  A formal, documented process is what a disciplinary hearing entails and the need for a cool, levelheaded approach is what is required to ensure the best outcomes for all parties involved.  To effectively conduct a disciplinary hearing requires the person chairing the hearing to have a sound practical knowledge of legislation as well as grievance procedures.  The BOTI Essential Course – Effective Disciplinary Hearing Training will give participants a basic knowledge of legislation and offers a comprehensive grounding in how to conduct a disciplinary  hearing.

BOTi Essential Course – Effective Disciplinary Hearing Training: Course Outline

Sub-Standard Performance Management

  • Setting Performance Standards
  • How to measure Performance
  • Counselling as a mean for performance improvement
  • Discipline & Dismissal

Discipline & Disciplinary Action

  • Employment Issues
  • Automatic Dismissals
  • Recruitment
  • Employment
  • Contracts Temporary
  • Distinction Independent Contractors vs Employees
  • Termination of Employment & unfair Labour Practice
  • Grievance Policies
  • Codes of Conduct & Company Policies & Procedures
  • Unfair Dismissals & Discrimination
  • Procedures for, Grievances, Discipline & Retrenchment
  • Affirmative Action (Employment Equity)
  • Conditions of Service
  • Time & Leave Issues

Disciplinary Hearings

  • Responsibilities & Roles
  • How to deal with Appeal
  • Performing an Investigation
  • Fair Procedure and Evidence
  • Disciplinary Standards & Norms
  • Evidentiary matters
  • Mitigating and Exacerbating Factors
  • Maintaining Records
  • Planning for Hearings

Arbitration Hearings

  • Arbitration Awards
  • Review of Awards
  • Settlement Agreements
  • Labour Legislation & Basic Conditions of Employment Act
  • The Occupational Health & Safety Act
  • The CCMA, Bargaining Councils & The Labour Court
  • Anticipated amendments to Labour Legislation • And much more!

Dispute Resolution

  • Conciliation & Arbitration
  • Preparation for Arbitration
  • Industrial Relations Negotiations
  • Union Negotiation, Wage Negotiation & Collective Agreements
  • Strikes, lockouts and Protest Action
  • The Labour Relations Act
  • Trade Unions & the role of Shop Stewards
  • Trade unions, their functions and structures

BOTi Essential Course – Effective Disciplinary Hearing Training: Course Duration

2 day/s

BOTi Essential Course – Effective Disciplinary Hearing Training: who should attend?

This course is suitable for Human Relations Managers and shop stewards.

**Quote does not include Any Exam Fees (if applicable)

For Disciplinary Workshop Training contact BOTI today!

IMPORTANT ACTION: Do Not Wait To Improve Your Skills.  

Book Now By Completing Online Booking Form / Customised Proposal or Obtain Approval For Your Already Received Customised Proposal

BOTI also offers: Labour Relations & Law Fundamentals Course

 

Don’t delay!  Skill up at BOTI today.

Future Course Search

Use search function to find your course or alternatively view all courses by category.
Then click search.

[event_search filters=”event_category,date”]

Book Now!See BOTI Terms & Conditions

BOTi Courses Overview – Employment Equity Fundamentals Training

(Employment Equity Course)

Course Introduction

Exceed Your Equity Targets with our Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course

This course is designed to give you a broad understanding of the Employment Equity Act as well as help you to understand the link between  Skills Development, Employment Equity, B-BBEE and an entity’s strategy.

Course Outline

Key elements of this course include:

1. The History of Learning and Development in South Africa
Overview of the National Qualifications Framework
Certification and Assessment
Credibility of Practitioners and Providers

2. Transformational Legislation
Linking Skills Development to Legislation
Compliance and Ethics
Statutory Reporting

3. Employment Equity
Statutory Responsibilities – Reporting and Compliance
Setting up an Employment Equity Committee
Monitor and Evaluate Implementation
Construct an EE Blueprint for your Organisation
Reporting on the Implementation of EE

Course duration

2 days

Upcoming Public Courses

Please click on link below for related public course/s:
There are no upcoming events at this time.

Public Course Schedule and Costs

Please click on link below for related public course/s:

There are no upcoming events at this time.

Book Now or Obtain Instant Quote

We also offer customized courses across the country: Anytime, Anywhere. Click on the link to get get instant proposal or book your Employment Equity Course

Book This Course Or Obtain Quote – Now

View Calendar for the latest course

Please Phone Us Now To Speak to One of Our Friendly Consultants

Tel:011-882-8853

OR

FOR CELL PHONES CLICK TO CALL

Please Fill in the Form – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

Please Email Us Now  – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

 [email protected]

The essentials of how to create an employment equity plan:  Employers, did you know that you can even customize your Employment Equity Plan? 

Want to learn more about how to create and implement an employment equity plan and how to work with a (broad based black economic empowerment) bbbee scorecard?  Enrol now on BOTI’s Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course!

Introduction to the important elements surrounding the creation and implementation of an Employment Equity Plan

This article is intended as an introduction to the important elements surrounding the creation and implementation of an Employment Equity Plan as well as elements of Affirmative Action (AA) and Employment Equity (EE) in general.  So what can you expect?  This is a complex issue, yet, observing the guidelines and taking heed of the recommendations of the Law will ensure that the process will run smoothly and efficiently.

Important factors to be borne in mind

This article also describes in detail critical factors to be borne in mind and important documents such as the Code of Good Practice and User Guide published by the Department of Labour.  BOTI’s Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course will ensure that you are up to speed on the intricate details.  Make sure that you are not left behind the curve.  Be informed.  Don’t delay!  Book now!

A brief overview of the Employment Equity Plan

It is incumbent upon every designated employer to design and implement an employment equity plan. The purpose of the employment equity plan is to enable the employer “to achieve reasonable progress towards employment equity”, to assist in eliminating unfair discrimination in the workplace, and to achieve equitable representation of employees from designated groups by means of affirmative action measures.

An employment equity plan must set out the steps the employer plans to follow

As a consequence, an employment equity plan must therefore clearly set out the steps that the employer plans to follow in order to achieve these objectives.

The Department of Labour has published a Code of Good Practice

And in order to assist employers, the Department of Labour has published a Code of Good Practice on the ‘Preparation, Implementation and Monitoring of Employment Equity Plans.

10 steps to preparing and implementing an employment equity plan

The Department of Labour has also published a user guide to the Employment Equity Act, detailing 10 steps to preparing and implementing an employment equity plan.   Hence, every employer should be in possession of at least these two documents that is, the Code of Good Practice and the User Guide.

An employment equity plan may be customized

No rigid format exists when creating an employment equity plan, and the Act allows employers to customize the plan to suit their own needs.

Employment equity and affirmative action (AA) apply to all designated employers and their employees

Employment equity and affirmative action apply to all designated employers and their employees, particularly those employees from designated groups.

Designated employers

Designated employers are employers who employ 50 or more employees, employers who employ less than 50 employees but whose annual turnover exceeds or equals the amounts in schedule 4 of the Employment Equity Act (EEA), or an employer who has been determined to be a designated employer in terms of a collective agreement.

Exclusions

Certain state organs are excluded, such as the National Defence Force, the National Intelligence Agency and the South African Secret Service.

Designated groups

Designated groups are African, Coloured and Indian people, women of all races, and people with disabilities.  All employers who have 50 or more employees on the date on which reports were due are required to report, and all employers who have 150 or more employees on the date on which reports were due are required to comply with the reporting requirements for larger employers.

Employers are required to take certain affirmative action measures to achieve employment equity

Chapter 3 of the Employment Equity Act requires that employers take certain affirmative action measures with a view to achieving employment equity.  Such are detailed as follows:

  • Employers must consult with the unions and employees in order to ensure that the plan is accepted by everyone concerned and to allow all parties to provide fair input.
  • Employers must analyse all employment policies, practices and procedures and prepare a profile of their workforce in order to identify any problems relating to employment Equity.
  • Employers must prepare and implement an employment equity plan, setting out the affirmative action measures they intend to take in order to achieve their employment equity targets.
  • Employers must report to the Department of Labour with regards to the implementation of the plan in order for the Department to monitor compliance in terms of the Act.
  • Employers must display a summary of the provisions of the Act in all languages relevant to their respective workforce.  These summaries are available from the Government printer and certain offices of the Department of Labour.

Want to learn more about how to create and implement an employment equity plan and how to work with a (broad based black economic empowerment) bbbee scorecard?  Enrol now on BOTI’s Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course!  BOTI offers business training programmes across south Africa!

Want to learn more about how to create and implement an employment equity plan and how to work with a (broad based black economic empowerment) bbbee scorecard?  Enrol now on BOTI’s Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course!

Implementation of Employment Equity (EE)

Where it concerns the implementation of Employment Equity or EE, certain documents are apposite to the process.  Such involve:

  • The Code of Good Practice on the Implementation of Employment Equity Plans
  • The Employment Equity Act itself
  • The Regulations under the Employment Equity Act
  • The user guide published by the Department of Labour.

The Code of Good Practice is not law but still needs to be taken into account

It should be borne in mind that the Code of Good Practice on the Implementation of Employment Equity Plans is not law.  It has been published as a guide to employers and it does give some valuable tips and information. Despite not being law, the Code must be taken into account.

Want to learn more about how to create and implement an employment equity plan and how to work with a (broad based black economic empowerment) bbbee scorecard?  Enrol now on BOTI’s Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course!

Guide to the creation of the Employment Equity Plan

All employers are required to have an employment equity plan in place which must clearly state the objectives, affirmative action measures, timetables, duration, procedures and tasks that will be implemented.

Application

The Employment Equity Act applies to all employers, workers and job applicants, but excludes members of:

·        The National Defence Force

·        The National Intelligence Agency

·        The South African Secret Service

Who do the provisions of the Act apply to?

The provisions for Affirmative Action apply to:

  • Employers with 50 or more workers, or whose  annual income is more than the amount specified in Schedule 4 of the Act
  • Municipalities
  • Organs of State;
  • Employers ordered to comply by a bargaining                  council  agreement
  • Any employers who volunteer to comply

Want to learn more about how to create and implement an employment equity plan and how to work with a (broad based black economic empowerment) bbbee scorecard?  Enrol now on BOTI’s Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course!

To whom does The Employment Equity Act apply?

The Employment Equity Act applies to all employers and workers and protects workers and job seekers from unfair discrimination.  It also provides a framework for implementing affirmative action.

Click here for further details around what the Act entails:  Employment Equity Act

Preparation and implementation of the Employment Equity Plan

Employers are required to prepare and implement an employment equity plan which will enable them to achieve employment equity targets in the workplace.

Want to learn more about how to create and implement an employment equity plan and how to work with a (broad based black economic empowerment) bbbee scorecard?  Enrol now on BOTI’s Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course!

What should be included in the Employment Equity Plan?

Based on Legislation depicted in Section 20 of the Employment Equity Act, an employment equity plan must include:

  • Yearly objectives
  • Affirmative action measures to be implemented
  • In cases where black people, women and people with disabilities are not represented:
  • Numerical targets that will enable them to achieve these objectives
  • Timetables
  • Strategies
  • Timetables for annual objectives
  • The duration of the plan (not shorter than a year or longer than 5 years)
  • Procedures that will be used to monitor and evaluate the implementation of the plan
  • Ways to solve disputes with respect to the plan
  • Those individuals responsible for implementing the plan

Based on legislation in Section 20, of the Employment Equity Act:

  • One or more senior managers in a company should be designated as responsible for implementing the employment equity plan.   Senior managers should also empower their managers responsible for implementation and provide them with the necessary tools and resources to achieve their objectives.  Employers should ensure that managers carry out this important task.

Basic Guide to Affirmative Action

  • Affirmative action ensures that qualified people from designated groups have equal opportunities in the workplace.

Application

  • The Employment Equity Act applies to all employers, workers and job applicants, but not members of the following bodies:
    • National Defence Force
    • National Intelligence Agency
    • The South African Secret Service

 

The provisions for Affirmative Action apply to:

  • Employers with 50 or more workers, or whose annual income is more than the amount specified in Schedule 4 of the Act
  • Municipalities
  • Organs of State
  • Employers ordered to comply by a bargaining council agreement
  • Any employers who volunteer to comply

Affirmative Action measures

  • Employers should ensure that designated groups comprising: black people, women and people with disabilities are provided with equal opportunities in the workplace.
  • Designated groups should be equally represented in all job categories and at all levels.
  • Employers should identify and discontinue processes that negatively affect designated groups
  • Employers must enable and support diversity through equal dignity and respect to all people and cultures
  • Employers should Implement changes to ensure that designated groups have equal opportunity
  • Employers should ensure equal representation of designated groups in all job categories and levels in the workplace
  • Employers should retain and develop talent among designated groups

Want to learn more about how to create and implement an employment equity plan and how to work with a (broad based black economic empowerment) bbbee scorecard?  Enrol now on BOTI’s Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course!

Why is Affirmative Action necessary?

Based on Legislation in Section 15 of the Employment Equity Act:

  • Affirmative Action ensures that qualified designated groups consisting of black people, women and people with disabilities have equal opportunity when applying for a job.
  • Affirmative Action is also necessary to ensure that these individuals are equally represented in all job categories and at all levels of the workplace.

 

Discussing Affirmative Action with workers

Based on Legislation in Section 15 of the Employment Equity Act:

Employers are required to discuss employment equity issues with their workers. They should also include workers from all levels and aspects of the business during talks.

Want to learn more about how to create and implement an employment equity plan and how to work with a (broad based black economic empowerment) bbbee scorecard?  Enrol now on BOTI’s Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course!  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa!

Who should employers talk to?

Based on Legislation in Section 16, of the Employment Equity Act:

  • When they discuss employment equity, employers should ensure that they include workers from:
  • All job categories and levels
  • Designated groups including black people, women and people with disabilities
  • Workers who are not from designated groups

 

What should employers discuss with workers?

Based on legislation in Section 16, of the Employment Equity Act:

Employers must talk to workers or their unions about the following issues with respect to employment equity:

  • Studies
  • Plans
  • Reports

Basic guide to Employment Equity studies within the working environment

  • Employers should study the relevant policies, practices, procedures and working environment. They must use these studies to make informed decisions in order to better conditions for black people, women and people with disabilities.

What should employers study within their own working environments?

  • Employers should gather relevant information from their working environment and conduct an intense study and analysis of their:
  • Policies
  • Practices
  • Procedures
  • The working environment in general

  Employers should study the relevant policies, practices, procedures and working environment. They must use these studies to make informed decisions in order to better conditions for black people, women and people with disabilities. What should employers study within their own working environments? Employers should gather relevant information from their working environment and conduct an intense study and analysis of their: Policies Practices Procedures The working environment in general   Want to learn more about how to create and implement an employment equity plan and how to work with a (broad based black economic empowerment) bbbee scorecard?  Enrol now on BOTI’s Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course!

What should be included in the study and analysis?

  • The study and analysis should include a profile of the workers in every job category and at each job level within the company.
  • In order to obtain the required information employers should request employees to complete form EEA1 which provides all the relevant information fields for purposes of analysis.

ow should the information gathered from the studies be used?

Based on Legislation in Section 19 of the Employment Equity Act:

  • Employers should identify problems that have a negative effect on black people, women and people with disabilities in order to design corrective measures for implementation.
  • Employers should use data gathered to determine how black people, women and people with disabilities are represented in different job categories and at all job levels.

Basic Guide to Employment Equity Pay Gaps

  • Employers are required to submit statements that show what pay workers in different job categories and levels are receiving.  Should pay gaps between workers deemed to be unfair, measures should be taken to ensure that such are reduced or narrowed down.

 

Reducing Pay Gaps

Based on Legislation in Section 27, of the Employment Equity Act:

  • Pay gaps may be reduced through:
    • Collective bargaining
    • Obeying sectoral determinations
    • Following the rules of the Employment Conditions Commission
    • Actions in the Skills Development Act.

Submission of employment equity reports

  • Employers are required to submit employment equity reports to the Department of Labour.  Employers who are otherwise unable to do so should advise the Department in writing.
  • Public employers are required to publish summaries of their employment equity reports when compiling their annual financial reports.

When are employers required to submit an employment equity report?

  • Employers with less than 150 workers should submit an employment equity report within 12 months after becoming an employer; and thereafter every year ending with an even number.
  • Employers with more than 150 workers should submit an employment equity report within 6 months after becoming an employer and thereafter every year on the first working day in October.

Employment equity report content

Based on Legislation in Section 21, of the Employment Equity Act:

  • An employment equity report should contain all the necessary information and be signed by the Chief Executive Officer of the company.

Employers who are otherwise unable to submit an employment equity report

Based on Legislation in Section 21, of the Employment Equity Act:

  • Employers who are otherwise unable to submit an employment equity report should advise the Department in writing and provide reasons for not being able to do so.

 

Publishing the employment equity report

Based on Legislation in Section 21, of the Employment Equity Act:

  • All public companies are required to publish a summary of their employment equity report to form part of the annual financial reporting structure.

 

Based on Legislation in Section 22, of the Employment Equity Act

  • The Ministers of government organisations are required to table their employment equity reports in Parliament.

Please click on link below for related public course/s:

There are no upcoming events at this time.

Book Now or Obtain Instant Quote

We also offer customized courses across the country: Anytime, Anywhere. Click on the link to get get instant proposal or book your Employment Equity Course

:

Book This Course Or Obtain Quote – Now

View Calendar for the latest course

Please Phone Us Now To Speak to One of Our Friendly Consultants

Tel:011-882-8853

OR

FOR CELL PHONES CLICK TO CALL

Please Fill in the Form – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

Please Email Us Now  – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

 [email protected]

You might also like: Getting to grips with the Labour Relations Act of South Africa – all you need to know about how it operates

People Management: Labour Relations & Law, Employment Equity Course

bbbee Levels – Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment

BOTi Courses Overview – Procurement Supply Chain Management Training

supply chain courses in South Africa,  Demand Planning Course in South Africa

Course Introduction

Supply chain management (SCM) is “the systemic, strategic coordination of the traditional business functions and the tactics across these business functions within a particular company and across businesses within the supply chain, for the purposes of improving the long term performance of the individual companies and the supply chain as a whole.” It has also been defined as the “design, planning, execution, control, and monitoring of supply chain activities with the objective of creating net value, building a competitive infrastructure, leveraging worldwide logistics, synchronizing supply with demand and measuring performance globally. Our Procurement Supply Chain Management Training Course assists delegates in understanding these concepts and more technical matters and thus can be considered as Procurement training for beginners and Advanced levels .

The Challenge 

Managers are often faced with a number of highly technical and complex decisions and procedures in the supply chain area. Corporate governance, strict adherence to polices and high levels of ethics are required for effective supply chain management.  A Detailed knowledge of Government Procurement Regulations and related technicalities is also required (i.e. Public Procurement Training Courses) Thus, there is a demand for a broad range of  procurement training for beginners to an advanced level.

The Solution 

Upon successful completion of this course you will have achieved the following learning  outcomes:

  • Understand the meaning and aim of SCM
  • Understand applicable legislation and other related policy initiatives that guide SCM in the public sector
  • Ensure that necessary checks are undertaken to ensure that the bidders are not prohibited
  • Prepare and plan for the bidding process
  • Establish a functional Demand Management, Demand pPanning course in South Africa. Demand Planning is a multi-layered and integrated forecasting process to determine the optimal level of inventory. Thus lowering inventory level and improving profitability. Demand Planning courses in South Africa specifically take this into account.
  • Understand ethics and the code of conduct for bid adjudication committees  and supply chain practitioners
  • Understand general conditions for contract (GCC) simplified
  • Understand alignment of preferential procurement with the aims of BBBEEA.
  • Understand that when it comes to Public Procurement Training Courses, in South Africa we have to specifically consider the PFMA Act   and the  Preferential  Procurement Regulations, 2017, issued by the National Treasury. Main changes introduced by the revised Preferential Procurement Regulations relate to the importance of B-BBEE in the procurement process (Public Procurement Training Courses). For  all transactions up to R50 m, B-BBEE will now play a much more important role. BOTI offers courses dedicated to tendering.
  • Understand pre-qualification and qualification, adjudication, summarization, specification, responsibility of tender committee, RFPs, RFQs,  andRFI etc.
  • Appointing of service providers
  • Understand threshold values for procurement of goods and services by means of petty cash, verbal/written price quotation and competitive bids.
  • Manage shortages of human resources in SCM
  • Understand service level and performance management process
  • Understand procurement in construction projects

Training Approach 

This 2 day course has a strong focus on an outcomes based approach and is presented to encourage group participation and involvement. Key mechanisms used include:

  • Practical relevant exercises
  • Speeches and presentations
  • Team sessions
  • Practical demonstrations
  • Role-plays
  • Questionnaires
  • Discussions
  • Case examples

All delegates will receive

  • Material and refreshments
  • Memory stick with relevant tools and models that can be easily accessed when applied  at the workplace

Upcoming Public Courses

Please click on link below for related public course/s:

There are no upcoming events at this time.

These types of Purchasing and Procurement Courses in South Africa are so important that they have various names including:

  • Procurement training for beginners. BOTI realizes that very often delegates wish to have a through basis for training hence it has an approach that that its course should be presented as Procurement training for beginners.
  • Public Procurement Training Courses.
  • Demand Planning course in South Africa.
  • Supply Chain Management course
  • Supply Chain Training.
  • Supply Management Training Courses.
  • Supply chain courses in South Africa.

Please Phone Us Now To Speak to One of Our Friendly Consultants

Tel:011-882-8853

OR

FOR CELL PHONES CLICK TO CALL

Please Fill in the Form – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

Please Email Us Now  – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

 [email protected]

BOTi Courses Overview – Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training(old)

Course Introduction

Don’t be caught SHORT! This comprehensive course enables managers to :

  • Recruit and select people for defined positions within an organisation or the personnel recruitment industry
  • Undertake a performance review
  • Understand labour legislation
  • Deal with disciplinary hearings

The Challenge

The Human Resources funtion is key for any organization to achieve its strategic objectives. After all labour is one of the company’s most important resources and needs to be properly managed.

The Solution

Key outcomes of this course include:

  • Formulating performance standards for team members in a unit
  • Establishing systems for monitoring performance of team members
  • Preparing for a performance review of a team member
  • Conducting performance review interview
  • Planning and preparing for recruitment and selection
  • Recruiting applicants
  • Selecting staff
  • Demonstrating an understanding of the purpose, application of the Basic Conditions of Employment Act
  • Describing the regulation of working time and leave as set out in the Basic Conditions of Employment Act
  • Describing the particulars of employment, remuneration and termination of employment as set out in the Basic Conditions of Employment Act
  • Demonstrating an understanding of the monitoring, enforcement and legal proceedings as set out in the Basic Conditions of Employment Act
  • Able to to effectively handle hearings and reach reasoned decisions on the basis of evidence presented

Delivery Method

  • Two-day Instructor Led HR workshops in Johannesburg, Cape Town, Durban (South Africa) based training
  • Strong delegate participation and practical application of theory

Our objective of this course is to ensure that the acquired tools and knowledge are user friendly and easily applied in the workplace.

All delegates will receive:

  • Material, refreshments (lunch, tea),  after training assistance for 3 months (Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training Course)
  • Memory stick (with relevant tools and models that can be easily accessed when applied back at work) (Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training Course)

Upcoming Public Courses

Please click on link below for related public course/s:

Human Resources and Labour Legislation

There are no upcoming events at this time.

Customized Courses – Book or Obtain Instant Quote

We offer the HR Management Course / HR Course / HR Workshopacross the country: Anytime, Anywhere. Click on the link to get an instant proposal or book your course NOW:

Book Course, Anytime, Anywhere

Or alternatively click on the button below to view our full Public Course Calendar of close to 100 events:

2018 Public Course Calendar

Please Phone Us Now To Speak to One of Our Friendly Consultants

Tel:011-882-8853

OR

FOR CELL PHONES CLICK TO CALL

Please Fill in the Form – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

Please Email Us Now  – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

 [email protected]

Getting to grips with the Labour Relations Act of South Africa – all you need to know about how it operates

 

This article is an informative yet easily digestible summary of The Labour Relations Act South Africa which is guided by Section 27 of the Constitution.

The Labour Relations Act entrenches the rights of workers and employers to form organisations for collective bargaining.  In conjunction with the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, it also safeguards social justice in the establishment of rights and duties of employers and employees, regulates the organisational rights of trade unions, and deals with strikes and lockouts, workplace forums and other ways of resolving disputes.  Through the Commission for Conciliation Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA), Labour Court and Labour Appeal Court it also deals with strikes and lockouts, workplace forums and other ways of resolving disputes.

Labour Relations Act, labour relations

Who does the labour Relations Act apply to?

The Labour Relations Act applies to employers, employees, trade unions and employer organisations.  However, it does not apply to members of:

  • The National Defence Force
  • The National Intelligence Agency
  • The South African Secret Service

Hence, the Labour Relations Act covers the laws that govern labour in South Africa and is guided by Section 27 of the Constitution, which entrenches the rights of workers and employers to form organisations for collective bargaining.

Employer and Employee Organisations

In terms of the Act, all employees and employers have freedom of association which invariably means that they reserve the right to form, join and participate in the activities of registered organisations and that their membership means that they cannot be discriminated against.

The difference between a registered and unregistered union

Unions that are registered with the Department of Labour (DoL) are overseen by constitutions that abide by the principle of calling for a ballot prior to holding a strike or lockout.  Within the union, they also rule against racial as well as gender discrimination.  While organisations do not have to be registered with the DoL, registered unions however, are entitled to more organisational rights than otherwise.

What organisational rights entail

Trade union representatives reserve the right to carry out the following activities provided that such do not disrupt work activities.

  • Enter an employer’s premises with the intention to recruit new members
  • Conduct meetings and ballots in the workplace
  • Deduct trade union subscriptions from the salaries of members
  • Request relevant information from employees that is not legally privileged

Should a certain number of trade union members, that is, not less than 10 exist within the workplace, representatives can be elected to exercise organisational rights.

The higher the number of members a trade union has the higher the number of representatives it can choose, hence the more rights it will have in the workplace.  Should a union have organisational rights in the workplace its representatives will be entitled to oversee certain functions as follows:

  • Assist employees with grievance and disciplinary hearings
  • Monitor employer compliance in terms of Labour Law
  • Report on contraventions of the Labour Relations Act.

Union representatives are also entitled to a reasonable period of paid leave in order to perform such tasks.

How a union acquires organisation rights

Registered trade unions need to first follow the correct procedure in order to exercise organisational rights within the workplace.  Employers should be given fair warning of the union’s intention to exercise its rights and the union should prove that there is adequate support with respect to its endeavours within the organisation.

In the case where an agreement cannot be reached in terms of granting organisational rights the matter can be referred to the CCMA.  A commissioner will be appointed in an attempt to resolve the dispute through conciliation and if the dispute cannot be resolved either party can request that the matter be settled through arbitration.

  • The right to strike

Instead of approaching the CCMA a union may choose to strike.  However, should it do so it will need to wait for a period of one year prior to requesting the CCMA to grant organisational rights.

Union Security Agreements

Two types of agreements provide additional security and boost the bargaining power a union has.

  • Agency shop agreement

The agency shop agreement is a system whereby non-union employees are required to pay a certain amount of money into a special fund as a result of them benefiting from the union’s activities in the workplace or sector.

  • Conditions
    • The agency shop agreement system can only be put in place if the majority of employees in the workplace are members of the union
    • The amount of money paid into the special fund by non-union employees cannot exceed a normal member’s subscription amount
    • The fund should be used exclusively for the purposes of advancing the socio-economic interests of employees and may not, for example, be used to pay political parties. However, it can be used for example in a campaign against a VAT increase.
  • The closed shop agreement

The closed shop agreement entails that the employer and union both agree to compulsory union membership.  Those workers who do not wish to join a union can face dismissal and expulsion from the union will also result in dismissal.

  • Conditions
    • The union must be a majority union where the relevant employer and the union in question both agree to a closed shop system.
    • A ballot must be held among employees in question and a two thirds majority must be in favour of the closed shop system in order for it to be implemented.
    • Funds used are also restricted to the advancement of the socio-economic interests of its members.

BOTI offers courses on the Labour Relations Act across South Africa.  Book now!

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training Course

What takes place when employees do not wish to join a union

When employees refuse to belong to a union on the grounds of conscience they are referred to as conscientious objectors.   In this case, they can request that their contribution be paid into a fund managed by the Department of Labour (DoL).   Where a closed shop agreement is concerned conscientious objectors who are dismissed may challenge their dismissal in the Labour Court.  Should the Labour Court find in favour of the objector, the union and not the employer will be required to pay due compensation.

Should at least one third of the employees sign a petition to end the agreement at least three years after a closed shop agreement was made a ballot should be held to establish whether the agreement should continue.

Collective bargaining

The Labour Relations Act promotes what is termed: centralised collective bargaining which describes employers in a sector or area of work who join forces to bargain with one or more unions who may be representing their employees.  For instance, a group of mining companies may join forces in order to negotiate with mineworkers’ unions.

Three systems are involved in collective bargaining.

  • Collective agreement

The collective agreement is a simple agreement between an employer, for example, the Chamber of Mines and a union/s, for example, the National Union of Mineworkers.   The collective agreement only affects these two parties concerned.

  • Conditions
    • Both parties must agree to a collective agreement.
  • Bargaining councils

A bargaining council agreement covers a wide range of issues for example wages, benefits and grievance procedures and extends to all employers and employees within the boundaries of the council’s representation provided that certain requirements are adhered to.

  • Conditions
    • In order to establish a bargaining council there should be sufficient representation in both the union and employer organisations. The degree of representation must be approved by the National Economic Development and Labour Council (NEDLAC).
  • Rights
    • It is the task of bargaining council agents to monitor and enforce all collective agreements. Hence, they have the power to issue compliance orders, publish the contents of collective agreements and conduct investigations into various complaints.

Statutory Councils

A statutory council is a weaker version of the bargaining council.  It cannot be extended to any parties external to the council without the approval of the Minister of Labour.

  • Conditions
    • There must be a 30% representation on both sides in order to establish a statutory council which means that at least 30% of the workers must be employed by 30% of the employers in the sector.
  • Rights
    • Even in a workplace that has no union members unions that are members of a statutory council are entitled to organisational rights of access, ballots, meetings and stop order facilities.

Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

Set up by Section 35 of the Act, the Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC) is one of the most important bargaining councils and is responsible for negotiating common issues among public service employees.  It has the right to establish additional bargaining councils for various sectors involved in public service.

The Labour Relations Act makes provision for workplace forums

The Labour Relations Act also makes provision for workplace forums that encourage all employees, including non-trade union members to engage in promoting their own interests in the workplace.  Workplace forums comprise elected workers who engage with interested parties regularly to discuss conditions in the workplace.  Such issues handled by workplace forums are better suited to resolution through consultation as opposed to collective bargaining, for instance, education and training, job grading, criteria for increases or bonuses, product development plans and mergers or transfers of ownership.

Workplace forums also have the right to present other proposals to the employer which should be given due consideration.  The employer must provide the forum with concrete reasons should such proposals be rejected.

The aim of workplace forums is to establish a dialogue in the workplace that will boost efficiency in the workplace and employers can consult workplace forums regarding various issues.   While workplace forums do not remove the employer’s right to make unilateral decisions, they increase employee representation in the workplace.

Joint decision-making issues

Joint decision-making issues refer to certain workplace issues that are set aside by the Act which means that employers are required to consult with workplace forums regarding these particular issues as follows:

  • Disciplinary procedures and codes
  • Rules that govern social benefit schemes such as housing or provident funds
  • Workplace rules that are not related to employee conduct
  • Affirmative action measures

N.B.  Did you know?  In terms of the Labour Relations Act employees cannot strike over joint decision-making issues

As prescribed by collective agreements between employers and representative trade unions, issues can either be added to or removed from this list.

As far as such issues are concerned agreement must be reached otherwise they should be referred to the CCMA.  Should the matter fail to be resolved the employer can request that it be resolved through arbitration.

Employees may not strike over joint decision-making issues.

Establishing a workplace forum

The setting up of a workplace forum is restricted to a representative and registered trade union or group of unions and a workplace forum may only be established in a workplace consisting of more than 100 employees.  The process is overseen by the CCMA who appoints a commissioner to assist both parties in coming to an agreement in terms of the functions of the forum.  Should agreement not be reached the CCMA will establish a forum that abides by the rules of the Act.

Guidelines for the constitution of a workplace forum, in particular the process of electing a workplace forum can be found in Schedule 2 of the Act.

Special rights are assigned to trade unions who are recognised by employers as the bargaining agent for all employees.  In this case, they may apply to the CCMA to set up a trade union based workplace forum which means that the union can appoint forum representatives without holding an election.

A workplace forum can only be dissolved if there is a private agreement that allows for this.  Should there be no private agreement in place, a workplace forum can only be dissolved if a representative from the trade union requests a ballot that results in a majority vote in favour of the dissolution of the forum.

  • The rights of workplace forum representatives
    • Each member of the workplace forum must be given a realistic amount of time off to carry out duties and/or receive training with no salary deductions.
    • An employer must provide facilities in order for the forum to operate.
    • Workplace forums may invite experts to attend meetings

 

Workplace forums – how they operate

Workplace forums operate by conducting three types of meetings.

  • Holding regular meetings with representatives
  • Holding regular meetings with the employer during which session the employer must present a report on the company’s performance and financial situation. The employer must also report on the company’s financial situation and any future plans on a yearly basis.
  • Holding meetings with other employees in the workplace to report on activities and any joint decisions made by those at the meeting as well as the employer.
  • Meetings are conducted during working hours and workers concerned are entitled to full wages.

BOTI offers courses on the Labour Relations Act across South Africa.  Book now!

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training Course Course

Industrial Action

All industrial action, including strikes, lockouts and picketing is regulated by the Labour Relations Act.   The Act allows for the constitutional rights of employees to strike and provides recourse to employers to seek recourse via lockouts.

When a worker can strike and when an employer can lockout

Disputes over matters of mutual interest between employers and employees may involve strikes and lockouts.  Such include:

  • Wage increases
  • The demand for the recognition of a union as a collective bargaining agent
  • The demand to establish or join a bargaining council
  • The demand for organisational rights
  • The demand to suspend or negotiate unilateral changes in the workplace
  • Unprotected lockouts or strikes by the other party
  • Workers may, in certain cases, strike over retrenchments

What a lockout entails

A lockout takes place when an employer decides to withdraw work from employees or closes the workplace during a labour dispute.

Strikes

Refusing to work only constitutes a strike if two or more workers participate in the action. As long as the refusal to work has a common work-related purpose, the workers concerned may work for different employers.  For example, a domestic worker cannot strike alone yet mineworkers working for different employers are able to do so.

Varying degrees of strike action exist, including:

  • go-slows involving workers decreasing productivity rates
  • work-to-rule which means that employees do no more than the bare minimum required by the rules of the workplace in question
  • intermittent strikes which takes place when employees start and stop the same strike action over a period of time
  • overtime bans which take place when workers refuse to do any voluntary or compulsory overtime work

Two types of strike action exist:

 

Protected Strikes

The first involves protected strikes which provide workers with a certain degree of security in the sense that they cannot be dismissed for striking unless they engage in activities involving misconduct during the strike and employers cannot get a court interdict to stop the strike. Employers are also not allowed to seek damages due to production losses during the strike and they must continue to provide food and accommodation should such form part of the employees’ wages, although employers can reclaim such funds by applying to the Labour Court once the strike has ended.

In terms of the Labour Relations Act workers must follow certain steps in order to commence a protected strike.

  • The issue over which workers intend to strike must first be referred to a bargaining or statutory council or the CCMA.
  • The council concerned or CCMA must attempt to resolve the issue through conciliation within a 30 d ay period.
  • Should the matter remain unresolved a certificate to this effect must be issued.
  • The employer concerned must be given 48 hours’ notice of the intended strike by workers unless the employer is the State where in this instance a 7 day notice period is required.

Union members may force a registered union to hold a ballot prior to holding a protected strike.  A special procedure for disputes also exists which concerns refusals to bargain.  In such instances workers must obtain what is termed an advisory award prior to the strike which cannot force parties to bargain.

  • Exceptions

There are certain situations whereby workers do not need to follow procedure.  Such include:

  • Should the strike be in response to an unprocedural lockout
  • Should the strike be allowed in terms of the conditions of a collective agreement
  • Where the parties to the dispute are council members and the matter has been dealt with in terms of the constitution of the council
  • Should an employer unilaterally change an employee’s working conditions

Unprotected Strikes

If proper procedure is not followed or if any of the following apply a strike will not be protected:

  • A collective agreement is in place that protects the issue being disputed from strike action
  • In terms of this Act, or any collective agreement, the matter must be referred to arbitration or to the Labour Court.
  • The issue is regulated by an arbitration award, collective agreement or sectoral determination.
  • The parties are involved in providing an essential service, for example the South African Police Service (SAPS) and any service that protects personal or public safety or maintenance service, that is where the interruption of that service will physically destroy the working area.

Lockouts

A lockout takes place when an employer prevents employees from entering the workplace in an attempt to force them to accept a demand.  As with strike action, there are protected lockouts and unprotected lockouts.

Protected Lockouts

In the case of a protected lockout workers cannot apply to the court to get an interdict against the action and the lockout does not constitute a breach of contract on the part of the employer.  As is the case with protected strikes employers are not required to pay wages while a protected lockout is underway and employees cannot sue their employers for any losses sustained.  Nevertheless, an employer cannot dismiss an employee who has been locked out and replacement labour can only be hired if the lockout is in response to a strike and for the duration of the lockout.  As with protected strikes, the same rules apply to food and clothing.

In order for a lockout to be protected, employers must follow proper procedure – which is the same as the procedure for holding a protected strike:

  • The issue over which workers intend to strike must first be referred to a bargaining or statutory council or the CCMA.
  • The council concerned or CCMA must attempt to resolve the issue through conciliation within a 30 day period.
  • Should the matter remain unresolved a certificate to this effect must be issued.
  • The employer concerned must be given 48 hours’ notice of the intended strike by workers unless the employer is the State where in this instance a 7 day notice period is required.
  • Exceptions

As with protected strikes, there are certain cases in which this procedure does not have to be followed.  Such include:

  • when the parties to the dispute are members of a council that has dealt with the dispute within its constitution
  • when the lockout has been allowed by the procedures in a collective agreement
  • when the lockout is in response to an unprocedural strike.

 

Picketing

Only a registered trade union has the right to authorise a picket and it can only be held in a public place outside of the workplace, unless the union has the employer’s permission to picket.  The picket must be peaceful and must follow the Code of Good Practice on Picketing issued by NEDLAC.


Labour Relations Act, Labour Relations

BOTI offers business training courses on the Labour Relations Act across South Africa.  Book now!

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training Course

Dismissal and disciplinary procedure

Dismissal involves any of the following:

  • A contract of employment has been terminated by an employer with our without notice.
  • An employee reasonably expected the employer to renew a fixed term contract of employment on the same or similar terms but the employer offered to renew the contract on less favourable terms or did not renew it at all
  • An employer refuses to allow a female employee to resume work after taking maternity leave in terms of any law, collective agreement or her contract of employment or was absent from work for up to four weeks before the expected date, and up to eight weeks after the actual date of birth of her child.
  • An employer who dismisses a number of employees for the same or similar reasons has offered to re-employ one or more of them but has refused to re-employ another
  • An employee terminates a contract of employment with our without notice because the employer made continued employment intolerable for the employee

 

When can an employee be dismissed?

An employee can only be dismissed for misconductincapacity or business-related (i.e. operational) reasons.   However, proper procedure for dismissal must always be followed.

Misconduct entails an employee having deliberately or carelessly broken a rule at the workplace, for example, stealing. In such cases, a person may only be dismissed once the employer has followed proper procedure for dismissal due to incapacity.

Incapacity means that the worker has been unable to perform his or her duties properly because of ill health or lack of skills, that is inability.  If an employee is not doing their job properly, he or she can only be dismissed once the employer has followed correct procedures.

Book Now!

book-now

Banking Details:

Please contact us for banking details and quoting Delegate Name and Invoice number as Reference

Cheque Made Payable to:

Business Optimization Training Institute (BOTI)

View Training Terms & Conditions │ View Up-coming Course Calendar

15 minutes

Administrative Courses

Human Resources Courses

Leadership & Management Courses

RPL & Learnerships Courses

Soft Skills Courses

Software & IT Courses

Specialist Courses

Top Rated