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Everything you need to know about coaching and mentoring – top up your knowledge with these 10 hot topics

Everything you need to know about coaching and mentoring – top up your knowledge with these 10 hot topics

coaching and mentoring

“Let me show you how.”

Exploring the human element of the art of knowledge transfer

Welcome to the world of coaching and mentoring in business.  Here, you will discover just about everything you need to know involving this important topic.  But, don’t take our word for it, take a look for yourself.  Without knowledge transfer from one person to another, and all the intricacies involved in mentoring relationships, we simply wouldn’t be able to preserve our pools of knowledge.   Human beings are not robots and so when knowledge is transferred from one individual to the next, the process is not just about learning the technicalities involved in any body of knowledge being passed down, rather the subtleties and nuances of human psychology play a major role in ensuring that the way in which skills and techniques are taught to others is as important as the knowledge itself to maintain the highest standards.  Basically, we want to get it right.

Coaching and mentoring is as old as time itself.  If you think it is about time you knew more about this important topic, you are on the right page, so read on.

1.  Coaching and mentoring in corporate coaching – exploring the dimension of Emotional Intelligence, the EQ factor

2.  On building self-knowledge in coaching and mentoring –  at the end of the day it’s about being a good coach and mentor

3. Coaching and mentoring and change during tough economic times

4. Reverse mentoring – when the tables are turned as a result of technology

5. ‘Getting to know you’ – establishing rapport between the coach or mentor and the individual

6. Coaching and mentoring – Putting things into practise: part 1

7. Coaching and Mentoring – Putting things into practise: part 2

8.  Coaching and mentoring in business

9. The roots of coaching and mentoring – an exploration through the ages

10. Coaching and mentoring – where it’s at

1.  Coaching and mentoring in corporate coaching – Exploring the dimension of Emotional Intelligence, the EQ factor

When it comes to corporate coaching EQ plays a hugely important role.

In coaching and mentoring and particularly in corporate coaching the emotional dimension is often one that coaches shy away from.  Often, in corporate coaching emotional skills create the difference between a merely competent manager and one who is truly effective.  Hence, a great deal can be achieved with a heightened awareness of emotional intelligence or EQ when it comes to coaching and mentoring and finding a mentor can be highly beneficial.

Components of emotional intelligence

Even with experts engaging in IQ tests as a method of measuring the ability of employees, they acknowledged that the competencies being assessed were only a part of what contributes to an individual’s personal and professional success.  The five components of emotional intelligence in coaching and mentoring mainly consist of:

  • Self-awareness and self-control – understanding one’s core beliefs and values, evaluating how feelings influence actions and responding appropriately in emotional situations.
  • Empathy – the ability to understand and appreciate the circumstances and viewpoints of others and to understand their needs and feelings. Empathy involves understanding the emotional reactions of others and how such affect their actions.  The ability to show empathy stems from a genuine concern for other people.  However, this is not an ability that everyone possesses.  If one is to lead others through a difficult change, one needs to understand how the transition affects the individuals concerned in order for effective leadership to take place.  To improve the ability to be empathetic, it is important to be mindful not only of what employees are saying but also of the underlying emotions that are motivating their speech as well as their actions.
  • Social expertness – establishing positive relationships with people by projecting openness and optimism.
  • Personal influence – establishing credibility and accountability enables one to persuade, guide and inspire others.
  • Mastery of mission, vision and guiding principles – the ability to understand one’s role, company purpose and how they align.
  • Steering point – the steering point is the objective that results from a synthesis between goals, hopes for the future and ideals.

Body language and facial expressions often communicate volumes in their own right.  For this reason it is wise to ensure that they therefore convey a positive message.  As coach and mentor, it is also a good idea to ask yourself:

  • How do others see me?
  • Am I friendly and approachable?

Gauge opinions from others to establish how you come across.  The influence you have within your organisation is based on numerous characteristics, for example, your expertise, the network of relationships that you build over time, your ability to regulate and control your emotional reactions and your ability to convey enthusiasm and purpose.  When others are engaged in finding a mentor they will assess these characteristics in you in order to determine whether they feel comfortable engaging with you.

Higher EQ scores mean higher productivity levels

A significant gap separates the productivity levels of high performing, star employees from the productivity levels of average employees in medium or high complexity fields.  This difference can be attributed to EQ.  Companies that practise hiring based on higher scores on EQ tests observe a measurable increase in productivity.  This difference is especially evident in sales roles where emotional aptitude is vital.

Intelligence, knowledge and skills do not guarantee success.  In numerous studies, the determining critical success factor is high emotional intelligence.

When asked what irritates them the most, nine out of ten employees will often maintain that they don’t receive enough recognition for their accomplishments.  Most often, good work is not rewarded or praised.  Without mentoring or feedback employees often misunderstand and sometimes misinterpret how their work is being evaluated.  Finding a mentor with an understanding of these factors is critical.

Many managers are uncomfortable correcting employee behaviours yet finding a mentor is extremely important 

There are also times in any corporate coaching process when employees need to know when they are falling short of expectations and for this reason finding a mentor is extremely important.  As a leader, providing guidance is part of the requirements of the job, yet, must be tailored to individual circumstances since every person and situation is unique.  Unfortunately, many managers are uncomfortable when correcting employee behaviours as they fear emotional blowback.  Certain managers also believe that financial compensation is all the praise an employee needs.  This is a fallacy that coaching also attempts to address.

In a nutshell, when it comes to coaching and mentoring in corporate coaching all good managers coach their staff members and in today’s world employee outputs and how they achieve results must be carefully evaluated.  This leads coaches into more personal territories which certain managers and employees find uncomfortable.  Yet, people do desire and need feedback in terms of what they are doing well and where they are in need of improvement hence finding a mentor is crucial.

coaching and mentoring

The mentoring process

 

2.  On building self-knowledge in coaching and mentoring –  at the end of the day it’s about being a good coach and mentor  

‘To mentor or not to mentor’

In many cultures coaching or to be a coach or mentor  means that self-knowledge is the fount of wisdom. In Sanskrit there is a term rasa, which means ‘the delight of tasting one’s own consciousness’ (Anderson, 1996, p. 8). The precept on the gate of the oracle at Delphi was ‘Know thyself’.  Bagwan Shree Rajneesh said in a book Neither This nor That, which has been long out of print, that a much divorced film star might wonder why the women he marries all turn out to be bitches. Or, Bagwan wonders, why do we think we will be happy in a palace when we are not happy in our hovel. He suggests that it is useful to consider that wives and palaces do not exist except in our own imagination.  Again, as the poet John Milton said in the ferment of the Protestant revolution, ‘All are called to self-instruction, not only the wise or learned’.

Hence, one of the functions of coaching and mentoring and being a good coach or mentor is to enhance awareness of the degree to which we make our own lives. Much of this work seems to be directed at accepting the part that we have played in creating our own world.  With both highly advantaged senior executive syndrome – the temptation to ascribe such good fortune as we have to ourselves and the corresponding desire to blame everything that goes wrong on others. This article sets out approaches that we have found useful in addressing these perceptions. There are four sections:

  • Opening up the learner’s values.
  • Changing belief sets.
  • Bringing stereotypes into the open.
  • Understanding one’s life and career.

Eliciting values

In coaching and mentoring sometimes mentees as well as coaches find it a difficult or lengthy process to elicit the mentee’s values in a consistently structured effective way. If the coach or mentor understands the mentee’s values this helps  in making  fulfilling choices, taking appropriate decisions, formulate action plans, set goals, and lead a balanced life. It raises the client’s self-awareness of how their feelings and behaviour are affected by actions and events that support or challenge their values.

The mentee is asked to identify special, peak moments in their lives which were particularly rewarding or poignant. The technique is based on one of a series of value clarification exercises in Whitworth et al., (1998). It is most effective when the mentee selects a specific ‘moment’ – or there will be too much ‘experience’ to allow pinpointing of specific values.

When the mentee has a specific moment in mind ask:

  • What was happening?
  • Who was there?
  • What was going on?
  • What was important about that?
  • What else?

Listen carefully to the words the mentee uses and how their voice changes. Periodically pause and test the words used to see which values the mentee responds to. For example, this was drawn from a mentee interview: “An important time in my life was when I was changing careers. I was on the brink of making a big change, and saw the horizon stretched out in front of me. I was more than a little nervous, but the sense of possibilities was immense. I was spending a lot of time with my family, talking about the future. Their support was vital to nurture my dream and allow it to grow. They were honest with me – I value that honesty thing. I was being told that what I was doing was right for me. I knew that, but I needed to be told to be 100 percent certain. I was starting to re-train too, and I love learning and gaining knowledge. Also I like to ‘be alone’, and studying gave me that. And most of all it just felt right. I didn’t feel uncomfortable.”

Consider:

  • The community/family
  • Security and safety
  • Acknowledgement
  • Truthfulness
  • Knowledge
  • Space alone.

Once a list has been established, ask the mentee to expand on each one by using questions such as:

  • What does truthfulness mean to you?
  • Can you make it specific – is it truthfulness or integrity or truth?

This exercise can be repeated and reviewed to ensure that as the mentee’s self-awareness grows, their understanding of their values becomes deeper and more effective for them. The list of values can also be used to inform decision-making using a values-based decision matrix, where the mentee lists their values and scores them out of 10 on their level of satisfaction. They can be challenged to take decisions based on how their values are respected or ignored for each outcome. This can also be used to review life-balance issues for mentees using the scores as stimuli for action.

There are other ways of eliciting values based on this model which may appeal to different mentees and coaches, such as asking the mentee:

  • to list the must have in their life;
  • to take what is important to them, and what others say about them, toan extreme – and focusing on what the value might be;
  • to describe a time in their lives when they felt angry, frustrated or upset, and reversing the descriptions of what shows up.

Defining what a value is need not be contentious – it is after all, most important that this exercise means something powerful to the mentee, and gives the coach a series of insights into what is important. To make this exercise most effective in this important aspect of coaching and mentoring and being a good coach or mentor is to ask the mentee to describe what values mean to them at the very start. It may help to work from a list of examples to prompt yourself and the mentee when words fail.

coaching and mentoring

Coaching is a multi-faceted process

3. Coaching and mentoring and change during tough economic times

In coaching the past few decades has produced many changes to the business environment.  High performance is no longer an option, whether the organisation competes regionally or in the global marketplace.  Technological changes bring about new challenges on a daily basis but are not the only source of increased pressure within organisations.

Currently, we are experiencing a global decline in the economy, with the depth of downturn different from country to country, however, still very much a reality if not a fear or even a threat to organisational survival.

Employees who adapt and change along with the organisation are an essential key to business survival

If organisations are to sustain a healthy competitive advantage, employees who are productive and willing to continually learn and adapt as their roles change along with the organisation are invariably an essential key to the survival of the organisation at large.

What are the advantages of coaching?

Coaching enables employees to exceed in their current roles and increases their potential for future roles

Organisations today need people who at best exceed expectations and at worst meet the required standards.  Managers with good people skills can achieve that level of performance from their staff using coaching and mentoring techniques.  Therefore coaching can be seen as the process by which employees gain the required skills, abilities and knowledge to develop their skills professionally and become more effective in their roles.  When employees are coached both their performance in their current roles and their potential in future roles is increased.  Coaching and mentoring and change happens therefore it boosts performance in ensuring that employees know what is required of them and how best to achieve their objectives.

Sustaining employee motivational levels

When mentoring top performers, a climate of coaching them to take on tasks and responsibilities beyond those designated in their job descriptions is created.  Managers share their experience, wisdom and knowledge as well as professional contacts in order to sustain the motivation of those whom they mentor, maximise their contribution to the organisation and demonstrate an interest in their professional growth.

Why Coaching is important in the workplace?

Mentoring initiatives exist to orientate new hires, conserve and transfer special skills and to advance the interests of special groups such as women who break through the glass ceiling in overcoming isolation that diversity in the workforce creates.

An individual will often have more than one mentor

Often, mentoring is one-on-one yet is sometimes also achieved in a group setting whereby an individual may have more than one mentor, each with unique areas of expertise.  Coaching and mentoring are very different from counselling although many of the steps involved in the process share distinct similarities.  Counselling is frequently one-on-one yet, unlike coaching, is often designed to correct poor performance.

Coaching prevents performance problems at the outset

Coaching is designed to address and prevent performance problems at the outset, stimulating employee commitment and engagement from the very first day on the job.  Coaching and mentoring both recognise that employee growth and development do not occur spontaneously, often requiring a concerted conscious effort on the part of both managers and employees.  Beyond that, it also takes time and commitment in the sense that it is not just about advocating once-a-year talks following the annual performance review.  The best employee development process is ongoing which means implementing coaching at least once a month.

In a business and economic climate fraught with constant change, done correctly, mentoring one employee can also motivate others in the team and the organisation at large.

Coaching and mentoring and change – what can be traced all the way back to the Stone Age

Coaching and mentoring can be traced all the way back to the Stone Age when older members of the tribe or clan often taught younger members how to hunt, gather and prepare food as well as fight off enemies.   Yet, although we have come a long way since Stone Age times, the principles and reasons behind the process remain even more critical to business survival in the tough economic times of our modern era.

coaching and mentoring

“Let me show you how.”

4. Reverse mentoring – when the tables are turned as a result of technology

The rapid growth of technology and its resulting impact on business systems, especially in the online arena, play a very important role in coaching and mentoring especially when one is a coach.   Often, senior management need to know more about new technology that their younger counterparts can teach them which brings about another facet of the coaching and mentoring process in the form of reverse mentoring whereby the employee becomes the coach.

Reverse mentoring – a growing trend when considering a coach

Reverse mentoring has become such a growing trend that the term has now been adopted under the banner of the coaching and mentoring process.

Where technology is concerned, it is more often the case that those who are younger and new to management, even new hires, are more familiar with online technology than their older middle and senior management counterparts.  Indeed, many senior executives feel completely overwhelmed by new technology.  They recognise its importance yet they depend on others for advice to make decisions regarding its use, not always the best solution, since many technical individuals are not familiar with the broader picture.  Jack Welch, head of GE, faced this problem and solved it using the technique that has now been popularised as ‘reverse mentoring’, that is, instead of senior management mentoring younger staff members, senior executives are coached by younger employees in specific areas.  In the case of GE, it was 1000 executives and the topic was technology.

At GE the process required that senior managers, including Jack Welch himself, spend time learning from Internet and technology experts from within the company.  This training included basic Internet skills and discussion around important trends and development on the Web.  Critical to the programme was the identification of technology savvy employees who could coach and serve as reverse mentors.  These individuals may have been young and of low ranking in the organisation yet they needed to have the self-confidence to teach and coach senior executives about technology trends and even insist that senior executives, although occupied with other business issues, keep to scheduled meetings in order to be trained.

The main problem with this initiative was for executives to actually admit that they had a technology problem and might be in need of a coach.  For many, it was a difficult yet necessary task to obtain their commitment to ensure that they would take instruction from these younger employees in the role of coach.  The overall benefits – saving on costs as senior managers maximised the use of technology and were able to make better decisions.

coaching and mentoring

The mentoring process

5. ‘Getting to know you’ – establishing rapport between the coach or mentor and the individual

Any coaching and mentoring relationship (performed by coach or mentor ) is unlikely to progress very far or produce effective results if there is no initial rapport between the coach or mentor and the individual who is being coached.  The process of establishing rapport is essential. Mutual consent and a willingness to actively get involved in the relationship are essential ingredients to the coaching and mentoring relationship.

 

In certain cases, one party or the other may be an unwilling or an unaware partner in the process, for instance a direct report who does not want to be coached by a coach or where the person is chosen as mentee by someone more senior who takes a proactive interest in their development without disclosing the intent of the process.  The former is not necessarily a positive relationship and the latter may not be considered as a relationship at all if one were to apply the broad definition of the term.

It is important to establish mutual understanding of what the relationship entails

What is equally important is a broad sense of purpose, a mutual understanding of what the relationship entails, even if there is no fixed pre-set goal in place.  Even a casual friendship contains elements of being available, and of being able to provide practical or psychosocial support.  Relationships with low rapport and high clarity can still achieve results with respect to performance and learning.  A relationship with low clarity and high rapport is more enjoyable but less likely to create personal change.  Relationships that score high in both aspects are usually the most rewarding and successful with respect to measurable outcomes.  When both clarity and rapport are low, little can reasonably be expected from the relationship.

In establishing a rapport between the coach or mentor and the individual it often happens that a coach or mentor will encounter someone who maintains a high wall around themselves, protecting their privacy to the extent that creates difficulties for others who are attempting to get to know them.   While it is possible to have a relationship with such an individual, even on an amicable or more relaxed level, the relationship will lack substance and depth.  Reasons why certain people are unwilling/and or unable to share details about themselves are numerous, ranging from clinical problems such as Asperger’s syndrome to a fear of being exposed.  It is not usually the coach or mentor’s role to provide therapeutic counselling in those circumstances even if he or she may be qualified to do so.  The challenge is often one of reconciling the demand of the relationship for greater openness and rapport with the individual’s choice of not to venture into personal aspects of their lives.

The importance of authenticity

The essence of building rapport between the coach or mentor and the individual is authenticity.  This involves being present for and open to another person in a way that no technique, however skillfully applied, will achieve.  An authentic meeting between two individuals is the opposite of a programmed series of ‘moves’ which are not implemented for their own sake, but rather as a means to a predetermined end.  That is why a ‘have a nice day’ approach is counter-productive in that the recipient knows only too well that this utterance has nothing whatsoever to do with a spontaneous expression of goodwill towards them as an individual and everything to do with ‘selling burgers’.  As a result, being subjected to this type of formatted communication can cause alienation as opposed to bonding.

If it is to be successful, building rapport needs to be an un-studied, un-rehearsed response to the person as the interaction unfolds.  But it is also a reciprocal process (between the coach and recipient) in that the developing relationship co-evolves in real time in the space between the participants.  The essential ingredients for this reciprocity lie in authentic self-disclosure coupled with attentiveness and sensitivity towards the other person as to who that person is and ‘where they are coming from’.

Areas of common ground

The basic task of building rapport is to identify and start to explore areas of common ground in order to test for common values, attitudes and experience and the starting point for this is usually overtly trivial.  It may involve discussions about the weather, the latest news or the latest projects that the team is engaged in.  However, the content is not what is important here rather it should demonstrate sensitivity on the part of the initiator towards the recipient.

 

coaching and mentoring

Coaching is a multi-faceted process

6. Coaching and mentoring – Putting things into practise: part 1

In order to appreciate how coaching and mentoring – putting things into practise can be successful we now examine the topic from a practical perspective.

If you can, hire the best

In mentoring – putting things into practise means that you need to hire those individuals who continually seek knowledge and are eager to develop new skills and who won’t accept the current way of doing things when they believe that they can offer better solutions.  Seek those individuals who want to know the whys and wherefores of things and won’t accept anything without due explanation and who are dissatisfied with not being challenged

In hiring the best also ensure that those individuals are also suitably orientated towards the new work force.  To kick off the process, talk about the individual’s job responsibilities.  Review your assessment to identify skills gaps, knowledge and attitudes and discuss relevant training programmes, either on-the-job or offsite in order to help close those gaps.

mentoring – putting things into practise and the orientation process

Part of the orientation process after the new hire has commenced is to introduce departmental or organisational missions, strategies and tactics.  To get the most from your employees induct them quickly and as far as possible into the corporate culture, which should include information about the organisation’s financial situation.  Whether the news is good or otherwise it is better to ensure that people are informed to avoid negative speculation.

It is a good idea to introduce corporate values since these need to be discussed with mentees with respect to how such translate into behaviours that will increase visibility.  From a coaching perspective employees will be better able to understand and accept feedback that they receive when they are fully apprised of how their role plays out in the bigger picture of the organisation.

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Coaching and mentoring meetings should be held frequently and never be limited to a one-time conversation.  Ideally, coaching sessions should be held on a monthly basis.  Mentoring sessions should be held more or less frequently depending on the needs of the mentee.

Creating the right climate

Coaching and mentoring can only exist in a climate that encourages a free-flowing open exchange of ideas and opinions.  In light of this, provide feedback, not criticism.  Be assertive and specifically demonstrate the validity of your comments.  When giving feedback try to do so in a manner that communicates that any errors in performance are learning opportunities.

Becoming a role model

This rule applies to those who act as both coach and mentor.    Always bear in mind the axiom, “Do what I say, not what I do.”   In your role as either coach or mentor, it is not a good idea for your staff to associate this type of statement to you.   One needs to also bear in mind that when one is constantly visible to one’s employees, these individuals will be emulating you and watching your behaviour.  Make sure that what you do is also what you would want those you coach or mentor to do.  And most importantly, keep your promises.   In particular, ensure that you keep your promise to maintain open and honest channels of communication with those whom you coach or mentor in order to provide them with the opportunity to reach their full potential, personal empowerment and recognition and rewards for performance excellence.

Addressing training needs is an ongoing process

Often, employees’ training needs only become evident after a few weeks or months into the job or a job changes as technology progresses and procedures or rules change.  Whatever the reason, as coach or mentor, one needs to see training as an ongoing process and regularly address skills discrepancies through training that bridge the gap between actual performance and optimum performance.

In addition, as coach and mentor one needs also to look beyond the current skills needs of employees in identifying those skills that will contribute towards the individual’s potential for advancement.  If classic classroom training is not an option due to limited funds, consider alternative training methods such as online training.  Assignment as assistant on a project can also provide a learning experience for individuals who learn well from example.

coaching and mentoring

“Let me show you how.”

 

7. Coaching and Mentoring – Putting things into practise: part 2

In part 2 of this section, we continue our discussion of putting coaching and mentoring into practise with more tips and tricks of what it means to be an effective coach and mentor.

In becoming an effective coach and mentor when setting learning and career goals, employees need to know what you expect them to gain from training initiatives.  In turn, they should share their aspirations with you, especially if they are seeking a more lucrative position within the organisation.  You may want to record your commitment in writing as a way of helping them to reach their goals and which means that the commitment realistically promises what can be delivered.

Learning and career goals should be discussed with mentees at the start of the relationship and periodically thereafter in order that realistic and achievable milestones can be set

Keeping in mind that coaching and mentoring are about performance

Becoming an effective coach and mentor  is not only about development but also about performance.  Nevertheless, their purpose is not to address performance issues which falls to the role of counselling, the aim of which is to advise a troubled employee in lieu of the situation resorting in termination.  Both coaching and mentoring aim to sustain, if not improve performance levels with in maintaining continuous communication and managerial support.  It is important that employees know where they stand in the organisation, what they are doing right, what they are doing wrong and how they can improve themselves.  Hence, the importance of feedback from coach or mentor cannot be overemphasised.  The person being mentored also needs to be able to communicate with their mentor when they need help or assistance.  Both individuals need to maintain this dialogue in a timely manner and on an ongoing basis.

When your protégé needs to meet with you for a conversation, it is important for you to find the time to have the meeting, which often can require more than a ‘desk meeting’.  A meeting over lunch or coffee might be what is needed for the person to be able to open up to you away from others.

“Management in business today is different combinations of face-to-face, ear-to-ear and keyboard-to-keyboard.”

Michael Dell

Telephonic and email communication will make you more accessible to your mentee and such virtual communication channels should be used when one-on-one  discussions are not possible.   Email can make things easier in the sense that it enables you to discuss an employee’s performance as well as opening up the opportunity for your employees to share their dreams, aspirations and vulnerabilities with their boss or mentor.

Acknowledging improvement

To an employee, acknowledging good performance does not necessarily have to mean substantial financial rewards alone.  More often than not, recognition of improvements in performance or a major accomplishment can come in the form of praise as well as other positive reinforcements.   It is important to note that unless the achievement is acknowledged, no matter how small it may be, the improvement is not likely to be permanent and the accomplishment unlikely to be repeated.  Nor are either likely to be followed by greater improvements or accomplishments over time.   As a manager, part of your job is to provide coaching, indeed it may form a major part of your job description.   Consider the benefits of spending twenty minutes at least once a month with each one of your employees.

Providing constructive feedback

In becoming an effective coach and mentor the keyword here is feedback.  Often, we hear the phrase ‘constructive criticism’, but, criticism by its very nature is negative.  Where problems exist, feedback should suggest the means by which performance can be improved and not be filled with adverbs that suggest that the person always does wrong or will never improve.  Nor should judgements be made about the mentee’s attitude.  By suggesting that someone is lazy, argumentative or uninterested in their work is demoralising and more likely to decrease the individual’s level of performance rather than improving it.

coaching and mentoring

The mentoring process

 

8.  Coaching and mentoring in business

What does coaching and mentoring in business entail?

coaching and mentoring in business are processes that enable individual and corporate clients alike to realise their full potentials.

There are many commonalities that coaches and mentors share which mainly involve:

  • Facilitating the exploration, motivations, needs, desires, skills and thought processes that assist the individual in effecting positive change.
  • Questioning techniques are used to facilitate thought processes in order to identify solutions and actions as opposed to taking a wholly directive approach.
  • Techniques used support the individual in setting appropriate and realistic goals and methods of assessing and measuring progress with respect to these goals.
  • Techniques involve listening and asking questions in order to understand the individual’s situation.
  • Tools and techniques are creatively applied that may include one-one-one training, facilitating, counselling and networking.
  • Coaching and mentoring in business encourages a commitment to action and the development of lasting personal growth and change.
  • The coach is supportive and non-judgemental of the individual as well as their views, lifestyle and aspirations at all times, maintaining a positive regard for the individual.
  • Coaching and mentoring ensures that individuals develop personal competencies and do not develop unhealthy dependencies on the coaching or mentoring relationship.
  • The outcomes of the process are evaluated using objective measures wherever possible in order to ensure that the relationship is successful and that the individual is achieving their personal goals.
  • The coaching and mentoring process encourages individuals to continually develop their competencies and to improve new developmental alliances where necessary in order to achieve their goals.
  • The process works within the areas of individual personal competence.
  • Coaches and mentors have the necessary qualifications and experience in the areas that skills transfer coaching is offered.
  • Coaches and mentors manage the relationship to ensure that the individual receives the appropriate level of service and that the programmes offered are neither too short nor too lengthy.

Differences between coaching and mentoring

As can be seen, many similarities exist between coaching and mentoring in business.  In the traditional sense, mentoring enables an individual to follow in the footsteps of an often older and wiser colleague who can pass on knowledge and experience and open doors to opportunities that would otherwise be out of reach.

On the other hand, coaching is not generally performed on the basis that the coach has direct experience of the individual’s formal occupational role unless the coaching is specific and skills focussed.

However, there are professionals who offer their services under the banner of mentoring and who have no direct experience of the roles of the individual and those that offer services under the banner of coaching do in fact have the relevant experience.  Hence, it is essential to determine what your needs are and to ensure that the coach or mentor in question can offer the level of service required.

Coaching and mentoring in business

Catalysts that often inspire companies to seek coaching and mentoring usually take the form of organisational development, changes brought about by changes in the actual structure of the business such as mergers and acquisitions and the needs to provide key staff with support through role or career changes.

What is coaching and mentoring in the workplace?

At one stage, coaching and mentoring were strictly reserved for senior management and company directors.  However, it is now available to everyone as a professional or personal development tool.  Coaching and mentoring are also closely associated with organisational change initiatives with a view to assisting staff to accept and adapt to changes in a manner consistent with their personal values and goals.

What are the benefits of coaching and mentoring?

Since they are both focussed on the individual, coaching and mentoring can enhance morale and improve motivation and productivity as well as reduce staff turnover since individuals feel valued and connect with both small and large organisational changes.  This role may be provided by internal coaches or mentors within the organisation as well as professional coaching agencies.

coaching and mentoring

Coaching is a multi-faceted process

 

9. The roots of coaching and mentoring – an exploration through the ages

In terms of the roots of coaching and mentoring during the course of history and throughout all societies, there have always been individuals who would invest their personal time to help others to achieve more than they would otherwise be able to do without such support.

Coaching and the Western philosophers

Looking back through the ages at the roots of coaching and mentoring, there have been many significant historical relationships that bear the mark of coach and mentor such as Socrates and Plato, Haydn and Beethoven and Freud and Jung.  The fathers of Western philosophy considered the transmission of experience to be a moral duty and the sharing of knowledge was in fact a matter of course.

For instance, Socrates believed knowledge to be the most valuable commodity an individual can possess and as a consequence should be shared for the good of the community.

The relationship of older teacher to student can be found not only in ancient Greece, indeed, it appears throughout the world at large.

By the Middle Ages, a system had emerged whereby apprentices would learn their trade under a master who had undergone the same process himself.  Often, a master was related to the apprentice, yet, on most occasions master and student were not related but the master was a skilled artisan who shared knowledge and skills with the apprentice in return for near-free labour.

The master craftsman as coach as part of the roots of coaching and mentoring

For many centuries, apprenticeship was invariably the only method by which advanced technical skills and knowledge were imparted to others.  Essentially, the master craftsman would ‘coach’ (or teach) the apprentice.  While often illiterate, the craftsman nevertheless taught by practical example as opposed to academic learning.

Medicine, law and government

Mentoring also took place in religious orders.  The disciplines of medicine, law and government were all taught in the same way, that is, a senior practitioner instructed his protégé.   Even as we are now into the 21st Century this model has not changed.  Apprenticeships still remain the principle form of technical training, formal apprenticeships now having been replaced with vocational training.

Even today, in law and medicine, students are expected to work for a certain period of time under senior practitioners before they are considered to be fully qualified.  In universities, a senior professor takes on the classic mentor’s role with graduate students in sharing their knowledge and expertise to help students complete Master’s and doctorate theses.  Nor should we disregard the mentoring role played by members of the clergy as well as social workers and concerned volunteers who help people to cope with various personal problems.

The sporting world

In the sporting world coaching is a full-time commitment with the coach recruiting team members, helping athletes to improve and perfect their skills, advising on personal issues that interfere with their performance and directing their performance to achieve excellence.

Yet, coaching reaches far beyond the sporting arena.  Professional coaching is a critical element in the successful execution of any game plan.  Today’s view of coaching has evolved from the field of adult development which came about in the late 1950s.  While earlier work by psychologists such as Sigmund Freud, Alfred Adler, Car Jung, Erik Erikson and Roger Gould all pointed to the role that a coach could play in shaping people’s thinking as they progressed from one phase of development to the next, it was the study of normal and exceptional growth and development of adults that led to numerous professionals applying developmental psychologoy to guide people through significant transitions.

Clergy, social workers and volunteers as mentors

And we can’t forget the mentoring role played by members of the clergy, social workers, and concerned volunteers who act as mentors to help people to cope with a variety of personal problems. In sports, coaching is a full-time job, with the coach recruiting team members, helping athletes to perfect their skills, advising on personal problems that interfere with performance on the field, and directing performance to achieve excellence. But coaching extends well beyond the sports arena. Professional coaching is a fundamental element in any winning game plan. Today’s view of coaching evolves from the field of adult development which arose in the late 1950s. Although earlier work by psychologists like Sigmund Freud, Alfred Adler, Carl Gustav Jung, Erik H. Erikson, and Roger Gould pointed to the role that a coach could play in reframing people’s thinking as they moved from one phase of human development to another, it was the study of normal and extraordinary growth and development of adults that led to thousands of professionals applying developmental psychology to guide people through meaningful and successful transitions.

10. coaching and mentoring – where it’s at

In recent years, both coaching and mentoring have experienced renewed interest.  Let’s take a look at mentoring – where it’s at.  Membership of the International Coach Federation (ICF), Washington DC, has grown by over 600 percent since 1997 with over 3000 members.

Interestingly, new members are joining at a rate of approximately 100 per month.  According to a survey by Manchester Inc. an HR consulting firm based in Jacksonville, Florida, USA, 59 percent of organisations currently offer coaching or other developmental counselling to their managers and executives.

Companies not only offer coaching, managers are asking for it

Companies are not only offering coaching to their managers, managers are asking for it – signs of mentoring – where it’s at.  At one time, the need for a coach might have been an indictment of one’s poor management style.  However, more recently, managers and executives have begun to recognise how a coach, internal or external, can identify their strengths and weaknesses, set goals and develop creative solutions to ongoing operational problems.  To a certain extent the interest shown by executives and managers in having their own coach may be as a result of the use of 360-degree feedback programmes within companies that have identified unexpected interpersonal shortcomings.

Whereas companies are either increasingly hiring full-time internal coaches or contracting with personal consultants to server as executive coaches to their senior staff, there is also greater recognition of the coaching role that managers play in the job success of their employees.

Since coaching is a method of providing training as well as ongoing feedback, it naturally fits into the nature of the current times with so much interest in the value of ‘learning organisations’, that is, companies that recognise the worth of acquiring knowledge and skills as a form of competitive advantage.  However, too often, managers fail as coaches because they have had no formal training in this regard.  Getting employees to change their behaviour is by no means easy.  It takes a great deal of sensitivity to give constructive feedback.  However, without suitable training most managers either ‘tell’ or ‘yell’.  The problem with this approach is self-evident in that all it does is alienate the employee.

The problem with telling someone that they need to change is two-fold.  Firstly, there is no guarantee that the employee will accept that there is a problem.  Secondly, and more importantly, most employees become defensive when they are told they are doing something in one way that could be done more efficiently in a different way.  As the best supervisory coaches well know, the best way to gain support for the need to change is to ask questions rather than to give answers.

Another problem with too many corporate initiatives involving coaching is the confusion surrounding its purpose.   An important part of mentoring – where it’s at.  Often it is seen not as an ongoing process but merely as a means to address troublesome job performance issues.  On occasions coaching is confused with counselling or the process of turning around problem performance areas.  This is mainly due to the fact that coaching is a part of the counselling process.  Again, coaching is also seen to tie in with the performance appraisal process rather than the more pervasive feedback that happens when employees come on board, and is given on a regular basis as needed, with a strong skills training element.

When effectively put into place, coaching can boost individual as well as organisational performance.  Yet, if poorly done, it can alienate employees and undermine performance.

Common coaching mistakes in mentoring – where it’s at

Despite the claim that people are their most important resources, many coaches fail to treat them as such which translates into indifference towards addressing the need for support and nurturing or for additional training and advice.When an employee is not doing what they are supposed to do, some managers tend to attack the individual’s personality without addressing the situation, thereby doing the exact opposite of what the employee needs in order to change undesirable behaviour.

Where employees have gone the extra mile to deliver outstanding results, it is often the case that managers claim that they have too much to do and do not have the time to praise their employees nor do they have the time to rectify any problems that may exist.  Unfortunately, this is not a viable excuse when it comes to being blind to staff shortcuts or other less than perfect efforts.  When these problems are ignored they can escalate to the point that counselling then becomes necessary.

coaching and mentoring

“Let me show you how.”

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CHANGE YOUR LIFE BY ACQUIRING NEW SKILLS! – Courses

 

 

Tel: 011 882 8853 – https://boti.co.za   –  Email: [email protected]

Address: 97 Greenlands Crescent, Sunningdale, Jhb

CHANGE YOUR LIFE BY ACQUIRING NEW SKILLS! 

Hi

If you are receiving this email it is because of one of the following reasons:

  • You enquired about one of BOTI’s 150 courses
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You will be receiving these informative newsletters on a weekly basis. Each newsletter will introduce you to one of our interactive and exciting courses – highlighting the main outcomes, as well as provide COMPLIMENTARY practical tips that can be immediately applied in the workplace!

You can benefit today from our extensive courses.

BOTI proudly offers a comprehensive range of integrated, cutting edge Skills Development, Team Building & self-improvement courses that are of an international standard. These courses have been tweaked for applicability in the South African market.

We offer courses in Computer Training; Soft Skills; CAD (Autodesk etc.); and more technical courses like Certification in Lean Six Sigma (Yellow/Green & Black Belt).

We offer affordable onsite OR offsite training and are able to conduct training almost anywhere, on any day (including weekends and public holidays) !

Our qualified and experienced facilitators throughout South Africa enable the flexibility of our quality training interventions.

We provide training at your site or at an external venue

Onsite training (at client premises) – clients provide the venue and lunch for delegates; BOTI provides the manuals & workbooks; pens & notepads (anywhere in South Africa & Africa)

External Venue training  (at one of our training venues) – BOTI provides the venue; morning & afternoon tea/coffee/muffins/biscuits; Lunch and refreshments; hand/shoulder massage (venue and course dependent); manuals & workbook; pens & notepads

Be trained anywhere throughout South Africa

Our training facilities nationally:

JOHANNESBURG:

  • Leeuwkop & Kikuyu Rd, Sunninghill
  • 106 Katherine St, Sandton
  • The Think Tank (97 Greenlands Cresent, Sunningdale)
  • 2nd Floor, West Tower, Nelson Mandela Square

PRETORIA:

  • 5 Darlington Rd, Pretoria

DURBAN:

  • 100 Venice Road, Mornigside
  • 88 Queen Victoria Street, Gardens

CAPE TOWN:

  • 88 Queen Victoria Street, Gardens
  • 7th Floor, Mandela Rhodes Place, Cnr of Wale and Burg Street

For an in-depth look at what we offer click on our secure website  boti.co.za  or alternatively view our latest course schedules.

Alternatively please free to contact one of our consultants to assist you on 011 882-8853.

Here what our clients are saying:

…I got to understand myself and my leadership style better…Very beneficial and relevant to the real life working situation. 

…It was a great learning curve for me and I have learnt a lot. I wouldn’t change anything.

…The trainer was extremely knowledgable and had lots of different ways, tips and advice…I couldn’t praise the trainer enough for he has taught me…

…All the personal advice and touches, tips that the trainer gave me were excellent, due to her industry knowledge 

…Revelation of my own strengths and weaknesses…and being exposed to ways of strengthening the weaknesses

… The course changed my whole life! The course was excellent and the presenter was very professional!!

 How you can benefit from BOTI’s training:

BOTI is driven by customer service excellence and a passion for lifelong learning.

BOTI is a Level 1 BBEEE enterprise

We combine various delivery methodologies and techniques, ensuring that we impart knowledge and skills that delegates take back to their workplace and make a difference.

 All our courses are outcomes based – focusing on the skills transfer enabled upon course completion.

Our trainers and facilitators are subject matter experts, with certification in relevant areas of expertise; and over 10 years-experience in their respective fields. 

BOTI provides 150 cost effective courses for individuals and groups at ANY location, ANY date, throughout South Africa

 

SETA Accreditation*

Tel: 011 882 8853 — https://boti.co.zaEmail: [email protected]

Address: 97 Greenlands Crescent, Sunningdale, Jhb

 

Computer courses

Computer Courses

Computer Courses

Computer Courses

 

 

BOTI working with key service providers  has designed niche offerings that could be packaged together to maximize business optimization or alternatively each training module could be stand-alone – dependent on the needs of our clients.

 

Computer Skills Training

Our computer courses are  offered in:

  • Johannesburg (computer courses)
  • Cape Town (computer courses)
  • Durban (computer courses)

We can also offer these computer courses in other cities based on demand.

 

We offer a range of computer courses ranging from basic computer skills to advanced skills.

 

 

Computer Courses

 

Category

Description

Computer Courses

Adobe
Creative Suite

Hands-on
Adobe Creative Suite training classes and private and
customized computer courses

Adobe Acrobat Advanced
Training Course

Adobe Acrobat Beginners
Training Course

Adobe Dreamweaver
Advanced  Training Course

Adobe Flash Advanced
course  Training Course

Adobe Illustrator Advanced
Training Course

Adobe Illustrator
Beginners  Training Course

Adobe In Design
Beginners  Training Course

Adobe Photoshop Training Course

Adobe Photoshop Training Course

Adobe Flash Beginners
Training Course

Graphic Design
Fundamentals Training Course

Adobe Dreamweaver
Beginners  Training Course

Adobe In Design
Advanced  Training Course

CAD Training Center

State-of-the
art CAD training for area professionals – computer courses

AutoCAD/AutoCAD
LT 2014 Essentials  Training Course

AutoCAD 2014 Advanced
Training Course

AutoCAD 3D Drawing
and Modelling Training Course

AutoCAD Civil 3D
Essentials Training Course

AutoCAD Electrical
Essentials
Training Course

AutoCAD Inventor Advanced
Training Course

AutoCAD Inventor Essentials
Training Course

AutoCAD Plant 3D
Essentials Training Course

AutoCAD Revit Architecture Advanced Training Course

AutoCAD Revit Architecture Essentials Training Course

AutoCAD Revit MEP Essentials Training Course

AutoCAD Revit Structure Essentials Training Course

Autodesk 3Ds Max
Design Essentials Training Course

Autodesk Vault Essentials
Training Course

Google SketchUp for Beginners Training Course

Google
SketchUp for Intermediate & Advanced Users
Training Course

Introduction to
Technical Drawing Training Course

Managing a Drawing Office
Training Course

MicroStation
Training Advanced Training Course

MicroStation
Training Fundamentals Training Course

MicroStation
Training

CompTIA

Computer
technicians install & maintain or solve problems that people have with
their computers -computer courses

CompTIA
A+ (PC Technician) Training Course

CompTIA
N+ (Networking) Training Course

CompTIA
Strata IT Fundamentals Training Course

Computer
Literacy

 Basics
of computing – computer courses

Introduction to Basic
Computing Training Course

Microsoft Office
All-In-One Training Course

Improve Your Typing Skills
Training Course

CorelDRAW

The
graphic design software has many features-vector illustration, page layout,
photo editing, tracing, Web graphics and animation in one tightly integrated
suite. For professional and aspiring designers

CorelDRAW
for Beginners Training Course

CorelDRAW for Intermediate & Advanced Users Training
Course

HTML
& CSS

Create
and design web pages.

Web Design: HTML
& CSS Advanced Training Course

Web Design: HTML
& CSS Beginners Training Course

Web Design: HTML
& CSS Bundle Training Course

Microsoft
Access

Database
skills

Microsoft Access Beginners
Training Course

Microsoft Access
Intermediate Training Course

Microsoft Access Advanced
Training Course

Microsoft
Excel

Harness
power of spreadsheets

Beyond
Advanced Excel 2010 Training Course

Microsoft
Office Outlook Intermediate  Training Course

Ms Office Excel
Advanced 2013 Training Course

Ms Office Excel
Beginners 2013 Training Course

Ms Office Excel
Intermediate 2013 Training Course

Microsoft
Outlook

Email
power

Microsoft Office
Outlook Beginners Training Course

Microsoft
Powerpoint

Presentation Power

Microsoft Office
PowerPoint Beginner Training Course

Microsoft
Office PowerPoint Intermed Training Course

Microsoft Office
PowerPoint Advance Training Course

Microsoft Project

Use
software to manage projects

MS Projects 2010 Training Course

MS Projects 2013 Training Course

Microsoft Publisher

Microsoft Publisher
Beginners Training Course

Microsoft Publisher
Advanced Training Course

Microsoft SharePoint

Sharepoint Beginners, Intermediate,
Advanced, MTA Fundamentals, MCSA Windows Server, MCSE: SharePoint and MSCE:
SharePoint Application
s.

Microsoft
SharePoint 2010 – End User Level 1 Training Course

Microsoft
SharePoint 2010 – End User Level 2 Training Course

Microsoft
SharePoint 2010:
Designing
a SharePoint Infrastructure Training Course

Microsoft
SharePoint 2010: Configuring, Administering & Troubleshooting
SharePoint  Training Course

Ms Windows
SharePoint Designer 2010 Training Course

Microsoft SQL Server >

Integrated data management
and analysis software that manages mission-critical information and runs
today’s complex business applications. SQL Server allows companies to gain
greater insight from their business information and achieve faster results
for a competitive advantage.

Implementing
a Data Warehouse with MS SQL Server 2014 

MCSA: SQL Server 2014 

Microsoft SQL Server
2012 

Microsoft SQL Server
2012 

Querying MS SQL Server
2012

Designing
a Data Solution with MS SQL Server 2014

Querying MS SQL Server
2014 

Windows
Server Admin Fundamentals: Training for MTA Exam 98-365 

Microsoft Visual Studio

Learn
the skills to build and deliver different types of applications on various
platforms.  Each training path below is structured to teach either the
C# language on a .NET framework or HTML5 with JavaScript and CSS3, all while utilising Microsoft Visual Studio. The entry level path
is a great option for beginners who was to learn
.NET and HTML5 basics and core fundamentals. Prepare yourself for
certification on Microsoft Visual Studio.

Microsoft Visio
Advanced 

Microsoft Visio
Beginners 

Developing Windows
App Using C# 

Developing
Windows Azure and Web Services  

MCSD: Windows Store Apps
C# 

Programming In C#  

Programming
in HTML5 with JavaScript and CSS3 

Developing
ASP.NET MVC 4 Web Applications course 

Windows
Development Fundamentals MTA

Essentials
of Developing Windows App Using C#

Software
Development Fundamental : Training for MTA Exam 98-361

Microsoft Windows Learning Center

Introduces
personal computing and the Windows operating system.

Microsoft Windows 7
Beginners

Getting Started With
Windows 8

Learn Microsoft
Visual Basic 2012

Microsoft Windows Server

Use
Windows Server technology to power the next generation of cloud-optimized
networks, applications, and web services. These courses also prepare you for
certification on Windows Server.

Administer Windows
Server 2012

Configure Advanced
Windows Server

Install
& Configure Windows Server 2

Microsoft Word

Word
processing power

Microsoft Office Word
Beginners

Microsoft Office
Word Intermediate

Microsoft Office Word
Advanced

Sage Pastel Accounting

The
Combination of, innovation,  ease-of use and flexibility makes Sage
Pastel Partner the perfect accounting software solution for small and medium
sized businesses.

Sage
Pastel Intro to Bookkeeping

Sage Pastel
Partner Bundle Version 14

Sage Pastel Partner
V14 Advanced

Sage Pastel
Partner V14 Intermediate

Sage
Pastel Payroll Administration Certification

Sage Pastel Xpress
Version V14

Part Time Courses

Added
flexibility to study part time

AutoCAD Essentials
Evening Classes

AutoCAD
Essentials Saturday Classes

Autodesk Revit Architecture Essential

Ms Office
Excel Advanced 2010 Satur

Ms Office Excel
Advanced 2013 Satur

Ms Office
Excel Beginners 2010 Satur

Ms Office Excel
Beginners 2013 Saturd

Ms Office
Excel Intermediate 2010 Sat

Ms Office Excel
Intermediate 2013 Sat

Project Management
Fundamentals

 

 

Book Now!View Course Calendar

BOTi Courses Overview – Marketing Fundamentals Training

Course Introduction: Marketing Fundamentals Training

Aimed at delegated who wish to gain knowledge on the concept of “Marketing”.

Rob Terlingen has more than 35 years’ of experience in the following fields: sales, marketing, general management, advertising, corporate planning, business broking, management consulting, finance and business administration in companies of various sizes, in many industries.

The marketing methodology based on his research been refined over a number of years into ‘best practice’. In addition USA and European techniques and his own experience have been incorporated into SMME environment and the RSA corporate environment. The techniques are unique as they are backed up by worksheet templates that contain marketing metrics. The entire course is personally facilitated by Rob Terlingen. The course itself creates many ‘quick win’ and ‘Ah Ha Moments’ for the delegate and his company. The course is motivational and stimulating, and is likely to have a positive impact on your company from the beginning.

Course Outline: Marketing Fundamentals Training

Johannesburg (Sandton), Cape Town, Durban, Port Elizabeth, Pretoria – South Africa

Key outcomes of the course include:

• Concept of “Marketing”?

• Key questions to be asked

• Analysis of Environment, Product and Market
• Importance of researching the market
• Segmentation and Target Markets
• Target Market
• Unique Selling Proposition and Competitive differentiation
• Definition of Marketing Mix?
• CRM and Customer Relationship Management
• Metrics to measure Marketing Performance

• Importance of structured Marketing Plan
• Strategies and marketing objectives

• Branding

BOTI also offers: Strategies and marketing objectives training, Segmentation and Target Markets training, Importance of researching the market training and Customer Relationship Management training.

Course duration and fees: Marketing Fundamentals Training

Our two day training course is designed so that the knowledge acquired is applied practically, so that the business environment can be enhanced.

Please consult schedule for course costs or contact BOTI for a quote.

Recommended Prior Experience and Knowledge: Marketing Fundamentals Training 

The course (Marketing Fundamentals Training Course) is designed for the following attendees:

• Small business owners.
•Entrepreneurs

 

For the Marketing Fundamentals Training Course it is advisable that you have the following experience/knowledge:
Good English Understanding

 

BOTI also offers: https://boti.co.za/internet-marketing-essentials-training-course/

Book or Obtain Instant Quote

In addition to the related public courses, we offer the above course across the country: Anytime, Anywhere. Click on the link to get an instant proposal or book your course NOW:

Book or Obtain Instant Quote

Or alternatively click on the button below to view our full Public Course Calendar of close to 100 events:

2018 Public Course Calendar

Please Phone Us Now To Speak to One of Our Friendly Consultants

Tel:011-882-8853

OR

FOR CELL PHONES CLICK TO CALL

Please Fill in the Form – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

Please Email Us Now  – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

 [email protected]

Don’t delay. Skill up at BOTi Today.

BOTi – Get On Course

BOTi Courses Overview – Effective Sales Training

 

Course Introduction

Improve your bottom line performance and easily win over new business with our Effective Sales Training Course.  This comprehensive course will equip you with  tools to apply personal selling skills to products or services, apply closing techniques to sell products or services and overcome sales objections.

The Challenge 

Sales are key to any organization’s survival and profitability. This course provides the necessary skills to enhance the skills of sales people and sales teams  in order to achieve their objectives.

The Solution 

  • Apply personal selling skills to sell products or services.  Product, service and client information is established in relation to selling the product or service.  Techniques are incorporated in relation to listening, observation and questioning in relation to closing the deal.  Techniques are incorporated and applied that identify and qualify the customers and their needs. Sales presentation techniques are applied to enable the deal to be closed. Techniques are incorporated and applied that allow for the handling of objections by the customer.
  • Apply closing techniques to sell products or services . Closing or buying signals are observed and response is applied accordingly.  Finalizing the sale/deal in terms of confirmation of commitment or decision to purchase is demonstrated. Techniques to close the sales are demonstrated.   All relevant documentation to confirm the deal is completed. Processes for follow-up with customers are applied in terms of monitoring the fulfilment of the deal.
  • Identify and solve problems pertaining to closing techniques. 
  • Collect, evaluate, organise and critically evaluate information so as to make a decision as to when to apply closing techniques to close the deal.
  • Communicate effectively with customers when establishing the time to close the deal.
  • Understand the world as a set of related systems in that asking for the order is part of closing the deal and obtaining the sale.

Delivery Method

  • Two-day Instructor Led classroom (Sales Training South Africa) based training
  • Strong delegate participation and practical application of theory

Our objective is to ensure that the acquired tools and knowledge are user friendly and easily applied in the workplace.

Benefits of attending this course

  • Enhanced Ability to Retain Top Talent-– Your leading sales staff are always seeking development in the Sales Training South Africa Course. Growth not just in their earnings, but in their individual and expert advancement. By continuing their education, you’re making sure that they grow not just in their capabilities as a sales individual, but in broadening their chances to grow within the business also.Some sales staff search for management opportunities, while others are seeking to make more complex, bigger sales. Continuing education enables you to connect with your whole group and find out more about their strengths and weak points, in addition to their goals for the future. Understanding your staff better throughout this process also shows to your staff that you value them.
  • Talking the Talk— Understanding your customers’ vocabulary can boost your sales group’s capability to get in touch with their potential customers and customers on a much deeper level. By creating a better relationships, your potential customers will seem like they are being spoke to as peers, instead of being viewed as just being a “potential sale”. Each customer base has various requirements, desires, and methods of speaking about their issues. A lead can rapidly hear the distinction from a sales expert who genuinely comprehends their market, and one that is simply selling an item.
  • Best Practices— Assuming that sales individuals constantly are up to date with the latest best practices is reckless. Establishing a constant training schedule empowers your group to keep those practices in mind. It likewise assists the group prevent slipping into bad practices.
  • Enhanced Understanding of Products and Services— It’s simpler to close sales when you understand a services or product inside and out. Sales training informs associates about the services and products that they represent, making sure that they have the ability to highlight the most appropriate functions and assist potential customers comprehend why these services or products will assist grow their business. If you visited your Doctor for a cold and he recommended Tylenol, then you visited him 3 weeks later on for a damaged leg and he recommended Tylenol once again … you may not trust him. Is that the only medication he utilizes?  Why does he desire me to utilize Tylenol so badly? Your sales associates must not feel like they constantly need to recommend “Tylenol.”.
  • Much Better Forecasting— Sales training teaches associates ways to develop reasonable sales objectives, and more significantly the best ways to achieve those objectives. A sales representative who really comprehends the sales procedure, understands precisely what it requires to bring a brand-new customer on board, and can much better anticipate on their own exactly what they will achieve monthly. The advantages of much better forecasting are far reaching within the business, however there is likewise a substantial advantage for the customer too.

All delegates will receive

  • Material, refreshments (lunch, tea)
  • Memory stick (with relevant tools and models that can be easily accessed when applied back at work)

Customized Courses – Book or Obtain Instant Quote

We also offer the above course across the country: Anytime, Anywhere. Click on the link to get an instant proposal or book your course NOW:

Book Course, Anytime, Anywhere

Or alternatively click on the button below to view our full Public Course Calendar of close to 100 events:

2018 Public Course Calendar

Please Phone Us Now To Speak to One of Our Friendly Consultants

Tel:011-882-8853

OR

FOR CELL PHONES CLICK TO CALL

Please Fill in the Form – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

Please Email Us Now  – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

 [email protected]

BOTi Courses Overview – Diversity Management Training

Diversity Course; Training Diversity; Diversity Management in South Africa; Workplace Diversity Training Pretoria, Johannesburg, Cape Town -South Africa)

Course Introduction

Become a Diversity Expert and Embrace Diversity 

Managing diversity has been defined as: “Acquiring the necessary knowledge and dynamic skills to manage such differences appropriately and effectively. BOTI offers a Top Diversity Management Course.)  In the words of the great Nelson Mandela, “It is not our diversity which divides us; it is not our ethnicity, or religion or culture that divides us. Since we have achieved our freedom, there can only be one division amongst us: between those who cherish democracy and those who do not.”

The Challenge

South Africa has a very diverse workforce. Thus business realizes they need to assist employees in understanding, accepting and maximizing the potentials of these differences. This Comprehensive Diversity Management Training Course will allow managers and employees to respond to workplace diversity issues with trust and openness. Diversity management makes business sense.  People work in highly diverse, ethnic, religious and gender environments and it is important to feel comfortable moving between various cultures.

The Solution

Upon completion of this course you will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of diversity in the workplace.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the reality of diversity and its value in a unit.
  • Manage team members taking into account similarities and differences.
  • Deal with disagreements and conflicts arising from diversity in a unit.
  • Understand central diversity management concepts and be able to relate these to their context
  • Recognise the impact the diversification of the South African Labour force has on the workplace and organisational performance
  • Be able to distinguish between critical success and failure factors of diversity management
  • Be familiar with the legislative factors required to establish an appropriate human resource environment for managing diversity
  • Be able to understand and value diversity in order to create an inclusive organizational culture ·
  • Develop techniques for dealing with inappropriate behaviour ·
  • Know what to do if you or one of your employees feels discriminated against
  • Mainstream and integrate diversity management into organisational strategy
  • Understand the benefits of diversity in team members and clients are explained with examples.
  • Understand ways of utilising the diversity among team members are explored with a view to enhancing relationships and improving the productivity of a unit.
  • Understand ways of meeting the needs of diverse clients and communities through a range of products and services is explored to identify new opportunities.
  • Be sensitive towards and understanding of diversity are demonstrated through management activities.

Delivery Method

  • Two-day Instructor Led classroom based Diversity Management Training Course
  • Strong delegate participation and practical application of theory

Our objective is to ensure that the acquired tools and knowledge are user friendly and easily applied in the workplace.

All delegates will receive

  • Material, refreshments (lunch, tea)
  • Memory stick (with relevant tools and models that can be easily accessed when applied back at work)

Upcoming Public Courses

Please click on link below for related public course/s:

Human Resources and Labour Legislation

There are no upcoming events at this time.

Interpersonal Skills/ Conflict Management Skills and Diversity Management Skills

There are no upcoming events at this time.
There are no upcoming events at this time.
There are no upcoming events at this time.

Book Now or Obtain Instant Quote

We also offer customized courses across the country: Anytime, Anywhere. Click on the link to get get instant proposal or book you course:

Book This Course Or Obtain Quote – Now

View Calendar for the latest course

Please Phone Us Now To Speak to One of Our Friendly Consultants

Tel:011-882-8853

OR

FOR CELL PHONES CLICK TO CALL

Please Fill in the Form – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

Please Email Us Now  – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

 [email protected]

BOTi Courses Overview – Corporate Governance Training

Corporate governance course

Course introduction

The aim of this course is to teach participants the skills  and competencies required to support and embed Corporate Governance.   A good working knowledge of  the principles of corporate governance in terms of values, ethics and organizational culture is an  imperative  in terms of maintaining good corporate governance.

The Challenge

Corporate governance is critical for the effective functioning of any organisation. This course is intended for those individuals who need to apply the principles of ethics and effective corporate governance to organizational culture.   Watch  the video to  find out  more.

The Solution 

Upon successful completion of this course you will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between values, ethics and organisational culture and its impact on achieving goals and objectives.  The complexity of the conflicts between personal values and organizational values and ethical codes is illustrated with examples from the South African workplace. The relationship between personal values, organizational ethics, and  organizational culture is demonstrated through examples from the South African workplace.

We cover the following aspects of corporate governance in broader detail:

  • The imperatives for ethical conduct in South African organisations are explained with reference to acts, regulations, codes and other documents relevant to the entity.
  • The role of corporate governance within an entity is analysed to determine the contribution of a unit in promoting internal organisational codes and ethical practices.  The specific ethical practices of a unit in different areas are analysed with examples.
  • Relevant documents include the South Africa’s Constitution, the King Report, PFMA, the principles of Batho Pele, as well as acts, regulations and codes governing the sector or specific industry.

A key outcome of the Corporate Governance Course is to allow one to begin to analyse the business in relation to the principles of corporate ethics.

The Corporate governance course will teach you how to formulate recommendations for promoting organisational values, the code of conduct and ethical practices within a unit and entity including:

  • An implementation plan
  • The role and responsibilities of the manager
  • The communication activities
  • monitoring and evaluating improvements
  • Work effectively with others as a member of a team, group, organisation or community to improve the culture of the unit.
  • Collect, analyse, organise and critically evaluate information in order to identify areas of unethical conduct in the unit.

Our Corporate Governance Training Course teaches delegates to organise and manage themselves and their activities responsibly and effectively in order to demonstrate ethical conduct.

Understand King IV. If one was asked to sum up King IV  in one word, ‘openness’ would enter your mind. King IV constructs on its predecessors’ positioning of sound business governance as a vital aspect of excellent business citizenship. Excellent business governance needs recognition that an organisation does not run in a vacuum, however is an important part of society and for that reason has responsibility to existing and future stakeholders. With the intro of an use and describe program, King IV asks organisations to be transparent in the application of their business governance practices. King IV  strengthens the concept that excellent business governance is a holistic and interrelated set of plans to be comprehended and executed in an integrated way– great governance is not a tick-box or compliance workout. King IV  requests for conscious application of the King IV Code  and for its suggested practices to be analyzed and used in a manner that is suitable for the organisation and the sector where it runs. Conscious application utilizes the advantages of business governance in the interests of the organisation.

Delivery Method

  • Two-day Instructor Led classroom based training
  • Strong delegate participation and practical application of theory

Our objective is to ensure that the acquired tools and knowledge are user friendly and easily applied in the workplace.

All delegates will receive

  • Material
  • Refreshments (lunch, tea)
  • Memory stick (with relevant tools and models that can be easily accessed when applied back at work)
  • Attendance Certificate
  • After training assistance for 3 months

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So you want to be a manager – here’s what you need to know about Management as a discipline, the four Management functions, its purpose and practise

management, leadership, management training

Management = Planning + Organising + Leading + Controlling

We took a look behind the scenes at some of the most important aspects of what managers and aspiring managers need to know about management as a whole and crafted our thoughts into a single page resource to include our top key topics  that will enlighten and guide you. 

1. Heads up on the four basic functions of management

2. The Evolution of Management

3. Fundamental Management Skills and the Science and Art of Management

4. Management Perspectives

5.Strategic management and organisational goals and understanding the key concepts

6. Strategic plans and the implementation process

7. The Importance of Business Implementation and implementation strategies

 

1. Heads up on the four basic functions of management 

Management is a systematic way of doing things

When introducing the four basic functions of management keep in mind that the management process is a systematic way of doing things.

All managers, irrespective of their aptitude or level of skill, engage in certain inter-related functions in order to achieve their desired goals.

All managers carry out the main functions of management; planning, organizing, staffing, leading and controlling. But depending on the skills and position on an organizational level, the time and labour spent on each function will differ.

In a nutshell the four basic management functions involve:

  • Planning and Decision Making – determining courses of action
  • Organizing – Co-ordination of activities and resources
  • Leading – Managing and motivating people
  • Controlling – Monitoring and evaluating activities

The diagram below illustrates the inter-related functions of the management process.

management, leadership, management training

The four functions of management: Planning, Organizing, Leading and Controlling

Planning and Decision Making – Determining Courses of Action

The planning and decision making function involves looking ahead into the future and predicting possible trends or occurrences which are likely to influence the working situation is possibly one of the most critical skills a manager can possess.

Planning means setting goals

Planning means setting the goals of the organization and deciding how best to go about achieving these goals.  Planning involves decision making around the goals to be set and the future course of action to be taken from a given set of alternatives so as to effectively reach these goals.

Planning ensures management effectiveness

The planning phase ensures management effectiveness since it serves to guide the future activities of the business.  Essentially, the important elements include selecting appropriate goals and the paths to be taken to effectively achieve these goals.

For a manager, planning and decision-making require an ability to foresee, to visualize, and to look ahead purposefully.

Organizing – Co-ordinating Activities and Resources

Organizing can be defined as the process by which the established plans are moved closer to being realised.

Once a manager has set goals and developed appropriate plans as a means to achieve them the next managerial task involves organizing human and other resources that are identified as necessary by the plan to reach the said goals and objectives.

Organizing involves determining how activities and resources are to be assembled and coordinated

Organizing produces a structure of relationships in an organization and it is through these structured relationships that future plans are pursued.

Organizing, then, is that part of managing which involves establishing an intentional structure of roles for people to fill in the organization.

It is intentional in the sense of making sure that all the tasks necessary to accomplish goals are assigned to people who are best suited to achieving these tasks.   The purpose of an organization structure is to create an environment for optimal human performance.

Structure

The structure should define the tasks to be completed. The rules as established must also be designed in the light of the abilities and motivations of the people available.

Staffing is related to organizing and it involves filling and keeping filled, the positions in the organization structure.

This can be achieved by determining the positions to be filled, identifying the requirement of manpower, filling the vacancies and training employees so that the assigned tasks are accomplished effectively and efficiently.

The managerial functions of promotion, demotion, discharge, dismissal, transfer, and so forth are also included within the broad task of “staffing.”  Staffing ensures the placement of the right person in the right position.

Organizing involves deciding where decisions will be made, who will do what jobs and tasks, who will work for whom, and how resources will be assembled.

Leading – Managing and Motivating People

The third essential managerial function is leading.  The skills attributed to influencing people for a particular purpose or reason are aptly termed as ‘leading’.  Leading is considered to be the most important and challenging of all managerial activities.

Leading is influencing or prompting members of an organization to work together with the interests of the organization at the core of activities.

Creating a positive attitude

Creating a positive attitude towards the work and goals to be achieved among the members of the organization also falls within the scope of the function of ‘leading’, it is an essential requirement as it helps to instil the objective of effectiveness and efficiency by changing the behavior of employees to meet the business objectives of the organisation.

The functions of direction, motivation, communication, and coordination are considered as part of the leading process or system.

The importance of co-ordinating

Coordinating is also essential with respect to the task of leading. Co-ordinating is regarded as the essence of good management for achieving harmony among individual efforts in pursuit of the accomplishment of designated group targets.

Motivating is an essential quality of good leadership.  Motivating is the function of the management process that deals with influencing people’s behavior based on the knowledge of what causes and channels sustain human behavior in a particularly committed direction.  Efficient managers need to be effective leaders.

Since leadership implies fellowship and people tend to follow those who offer a means of satisfying their own needs, hopes and aspirations it is understandable that leading involves motivation leadership styles and approaches as well as good communication skills.

Controlling – Monitoring and Evaluating Activities

Monitoring the organizational progress toward goal fulfillment is the management function known as ‘controlling’. Monitoring progress is essential to ensuring the achievement of organizational goals.

Controlling involves measuring, comparing, finding deviation and correcting the organizational activities which are performed in respect of achieving the goals or objectives of the organisation.

Control activities generally related to the measurement of achievement of results

Controlling consists of activities such as measuring performance, comparing with the existing standard and finding the deviations, and correcting the deviations.  Control activities generally relate to the measurement of achievement or results of actions which were taken to attain the goals in question.

Certain means of controlling, such as the budget for expenses, inspection records, and the record of labour hours lost, are generally familiar. Each measure also shows whether plans are working out or whether they need to be revised.

Deviations

If deviations persist, correction is indicated. Whenever results are found to differ from the planned action, the individuals responsible are identified and necessary actions are taken to improve performance.

Thus, outcomes are controlled by controlling what people do. Controlling is the last but not the least important management function process.

It is rightly said, “planning without controlling is useless”. In short, we can say that controlling enables the accomplishment of the plan.

All management functions are inter-related and cannot be skipped. The management process designs and maintains an environment in which people working together in groups, accomplish efficiently selected aims and objectives.

management, leadership, management training

Organizing is that part of managing which involves establishing an intentional structure of roles for people to fill in the organization

2. The Evolution of Management

Most managers today recognise the importance of history.  Knowing the origins of their organisation and the kinds of practices that have led to success or failure can be an indispensable tool to managing the contemporary organisation. Thus, in this section we trace the history of management thought. Then we move forward to the present day by introducing contemporary management issues and challenges.

The importance of theory and history

Some people question the value of history and theory.  Their arguments are usually based on the assumption that history has no relevance to contemporary society and that theory is abstract and of no practical use.  In reality, however, both theory and history are important to all managers today.  A theory is simply a conceptual framework for organising knowledge and providing a blueprint for action.  While some theories seem abstract and irrelevant, others appear very simple and practical.  Management theories, used to build organisations and guide them toward their goals, are grounded in reality.   In addition, most managers develop and refine their own theories of how they should run their organisations and manage the behaviour of their employees.

An awareness and understanding of important historical developments are also essential to contemporary managers. Understanding the historical context of management provides a sense of heritage and can help managers avoid the mistakes of others.

The historical context of management

The practice of management can be traced back thousands of years.  The Egyptians used the management functions of planning, organising, and controlling when they constructed the great pyramids.   Alexander the Great employed a staff organisation to co-ordinate activities during his military campaigns.  The Roman Empire developed a well-defined organisational structure that greatly facilitated communication and control.  In spite of this history, however, management per se was not given serious attention until the nineteenth century.

Two of its first true pioneers were Robert Owen (1771-1858) and Charles Babbage (1792-1871).  Owen, a British industrialist and reformer, was one of the first managers to recognise the importance of an organisation’s human resources and the welfare of workers. Charles Babbage, an English mathematician, focused his attention on efficiencies of production. He placed great faith in division of labour and advocated the application of mathematics to problems such as the efficient use of facilities and materials.

The classical management perspective

At the dawn of the twentieth century, the preliminary ideas and writings of these and other managers and theorists converged with the emergence and evolution of largescale businesses and management practices to create interest and focus attention on how businesses should be operated. The first important ideas to emerge are now called the classical management perspective. This perspective actually includes two different viewpoints: scientific management and administrative management.

Scientific Management

Productivity emerged as a serious business problem during the first few years of this century. Business was expanding and capital was readily available, but labour was in short supply. Hence, managers began to search for ways to use existing labour more efficiently.   In response to this need, experts began to focus on ways to improve the performance of individual workers. Their work led to the development of scientific management.  Some of the earliest advocates of scientific management included Frederick W Taylor (1856-1915), Frank Gilbreth (1868-1924), and Lillian Gilbreth (1878- 1972).  One of Taylor’s first jobs was as a foreman at the Midvale Steel Company in Philadelphia.  It was there that he observed what he called soldiering-employees deliberately working at a pace slower than their capabilities. Taylor studied and timed each element of the steelworkers’ jobs. He determined what each worker should be producing, and then he designed the most efficient way of doing each part of the overall task. Next, he implemented a piecework pay system. Rather than paying all employees the same wage, he began increasing the pay of each worker who met and exceeded the target level of output set for his or her job.

Administrative Management

Whereas scientific management deals with the jobs of individual employees, administrative management focuses on managing the total organisation. The primary contributors to administrative management were Henri Fayol (1841-1925), Lyndall Urwick (1891-1983), and Max Weber (1864-1920). Henri Fayol was administrative management’s most articulate spokesperson. A French industrialist, Fayol was unknown to U.S. managers and scholars until his most important work, General and Industrial Management, was trans lated into English in 1930. Drawing on his own managerial experience, he attempted to systematise the practice of management to provide guidance and direction to other managers.  Fayol also was the first to identify the specific managerial functions of planning, organising, leading, and controlling.  He believed that these functions accurately reflect the core of the management process.

Most contemporary management books (including this one) still use this framework, and practicing managers agree that these functions are a critical part of a manager’s job. After a career as a British army officer, Lyndall Urwick became a noted management theorist and consultant. He integrated scientific management with the work of Fayol and other administrative management theorists. He also advanced modern thinking about the functions of planning, organizing, and controlling. Like Fayol, Urwick developed a list of guidelines for improving managerial effectiveness. Urwick is noted not so much for his own contributions as for his synthesis and integration of the work of others.  Although Max Weber lived and worked at the same time as Fayol and Taylor, his contributions were not recognised until some years had passed. Weber was a German sociologist, and his most important work was not translated into English until 1947.18 Weber’s work on bureaucracy laid the foundation for contemporary organisation theory.

management, leadership, management training

Management is a systematic way of doing things

3. Fundamental Management Skills and the Science and Art of Management

Given the complexity inherent in the job of a manager a reasonable question to be asked is whether management is a science or an art.  In fact, effective management is a blend of both science and art in its application.  And successful executives recognise and value the importance of combining both the science and the art of management as they practice their craft.

The Science of Management

Many management problems and issues can be approached in ways that are rational, logically thought out , objective, and systematic.  Managers can gather data, facts and objective information. They can use quantitative models and decision-making techniques to arrive at “correct” decisions.

They also need to take a decidedly scientific approach to solving problems whenever possible, especially when they are dealing with relatively routine and straightforward issues. For example, when the multinational, Starbucks, considers entering a new market, its managers look closely at a wide variety of objective details as they formulate their plans. Technical, diagnostic, and decision-making skills are especially important when practicing the science of management.

The Art of Management

Even though managers may try to be as scientific as possible, they often need to make decisions and solve problems on the basis of intuition, experience, instinct as well as personal insights.  By relying heavily on conceptual, communication, interpersonal, and time management skills, for example, a manager may have to decide between multiple courses of action that look equally attractive.  In many cases even “objective facts” may prove to be wrong. When Starbucks was planning its first store in New York, market research clearly showed that New Yorkers preferred drip coffee to more exotic espresso-style coffees.  After first installing more drip coffee makers and fewer espresso makers than in their other stores, managers had to backtrack when the New Yorkers lined up clamouring for espresso.  Starbucks now introduces a standard menu and layout in all its stores, regardless of presumed market differences, and makes necessary adjustments later down the line. Thus, managers must blend an element of intuition and personal insight with hard data and objective facts.

To carry out these management functions properly, managers rely on a number of specific skills.  The most important management skills are technical, interpersonal, conceptual, diagnostic, communication, decision-making, and time-management skills.

Technical Skills

Technical skills are the skills necessary to accomplish or understand the specific kind of work being done in an organisation.  Technical skills are especially important for first-line managers.  These managers spend much of their time training subordinates and answering questions about work-related problems.  First-line managers must know how to perform the tasks assigned to those they supervise if they are to be effective managers.

Interpersonal Skills

Managers spend a considerable amount of time interacting with people both inside and outside the organisation. Therefore, for obvious reasons, managers also need interpersonal skills, and the ability to communicate with, understand, and motivate individuals and groups.  As a manager climbs the organisational ladder, he or she must be able to get along with subordinates and peers, as well as those at higher levels of the organisation.  Because of the multitude of roles managers must attend to they must also be able to work withsuppliers, customers, investors and others outside of the organisation.

Conceptual Skills

Conceptual skills depend on the manager’s ability to think in the abstract.  Managers need the mental capacity to understand the overall workings of the organisation and its environment, to grasp how all the parts of the organization fit together, and to view the organisation in a holistic manner.  These skills enable them to think strategically, to see the bigger picture and to make broad-based decisions that serve the organisation overall.

Diagnostic Skills

Successful managers also possess diagnostic skills, or skills that enable them to visualise the most appropriate response to a situation.  A physician diagnoses a patient’s illness by analysing symptoms and determining their probable cause.  Similarly, a manager can diagnose and analyse a problem in the organisation by studying its symptoms and then developing a solution.

Communication Skills

Communication skills refer to the manager’s ability to both effectively convey ideas and information to others and effectively receive ideas and information from others. These skills enable a manager to transmit ideas to subordinates so that they know what is expected of them, to coordinate work with peers and colleagues so that they work well together and to keep higher-level managers informed about what is going on. In addition, communication skills help the manager listen to what others say and to understand the real meaning behind e-mails, letters, reports and other written communication.

Decision-Making Skills

Effective managers also have good decision-making skills.  Decision-making skills refer to the manager’s ability to correctly recognise and define problems and opportunities and to then select an appropriate course of action to solve problems and capitalise on opportunities. No manager makes the right decision all the time.  However, effective managers make good decisions most of the time.  And when they do make a bad decision, they usually recognise their mistake quickly and then make good decisions to recover with as little cost or damage to their organisation as possible.

Time-Management Skills

Finally, effective managers usually have good time-management skills.  Time management skills refer to the manager’s ability to prioritise work, to work efficiently and to delegate appropriately.  As already noted, managers face many different pressures and challenges.  It is easy for a manager to get bogged down doing work that can easily be postponed or delegated to others.  When this happens, unfortunately, more pressing and higher-priority work may get neglected.  BOTI’s management training courses, business short courses and leadership classes offer you the opportunity to expand your management skills in all disciplines.

management, leadership, management training

Management is an integrated process

4. Management Perspectives

Assessment of the Classical Perspective

The classical perspective served to focus serious attention on the importance of effective management and helped pave the way for later theories and approaches.  Many of the concepts developed during this era, such as job specialisation, time and motion studies and scientific methods are still in use. On the other hand, these early theorists often took an overly simplistic view of management and failed to understand the human element of organisations.

The Behavioural Management Perspective

Early advocates of the classical management perspective essentially viewed organisations and jobs from a mechanistic point of view – that is, they essentially sought to conceptualise organisations as machines and workers as cogs within those machines. Even though many early writers recognised the role of individuals, these management pioneers tended to focus on how managers could control and standardise the behaviour of their employees.  In contrast, the behavioural management perspective placed much more emphasis on individual attitudes and behaviours.

The behavioural management perspective was stimulated by a number of writers and theoretical movements. One of those movements was industrial psychology, the practice of applying psychological concepts to industrial settings. Hugo Munsterberg (1863-1916), a noted German psychologist, is recognised as the father of industrial psychology.  He suggested that psychologists could make valuable contributions to managers in the areas of employee selection and motivation. Industrial psychology is still a major course of study at many colleges and universities.  Another early advocate of the behavioural approach to management was Mary Parker Follett.  Follett worked during the scientific management era, but quickly came to recognise the human element in the workplace.  Indeed, her work clearly anticipated the behavioural management perspective, and she appreciated the need to understand the role of human behaviour in organisations.  Her specific interests were in adult education and vocational guidance. Follett believed that organisations should become more democratic in accommodating employees and managers.

The Hawthorne Studies

Although Munsterberg and Follett made major contributions to the development of the behavioural approach to management, its primary catalyst was a series of studies conducted near Chicago at Western Electric’s Hawthorne plant between 1927 and 1932.

The research, originally sponsored by General Electric, was conducted by Elton Mayo and his associates. The first study involved manipulating illumination for one group of workers and comparing their subsequent productivity with the productivity. of another group whose illumination was not changed.  Surprisingly, when illumination was increased for the experimental group, productivity went up in both groups.  Productivity continued to increase in both groups, even when the lighting for the experimental group was decreased. Not until the lighting was reduced to the level of moonlight did productivity begin to decline (and General Electric withdrew its sponsorship).  Another experiment established a piecework incentive pay plan for a group of nine men assembling terminal banks for telephone exchanges.  Scientific management would have predicted that each man would try to maximize his pay by producing as many units as possible.  Mayo and his associates, however, found that the group itself informally established an acceptable level of output for its members.  Workers who over produced were branded “rate busters,” and under producers were labeled “chiselers.” To be accepted by the group, workers produced at the accepted level.  As they approached this acceptable level of output, workers slacked off to avoid overproducing.

Other studies, including an interview program involving several thousand workers, led Mayo and his associates to conclude that human behaviour was much more important in the workplace than researchers had previously believed.  In the lighting experiment, for example, the results were attributed to the fact that both groups received special attention and sympathetic supervision for perhaps the first time.  The incentive pay plans did not work in determining output because wage incentives were less important to the individual workers than was social acceptance.  In short, individual and social processes played a major role in shaping worker attitudes and behaviour.

Human Relations

The human relations movement, which grew from the Hawthorne studies and was a popular approach to management for many years, proposed that workers respond primarily to the social context of the workplace, including social conditioning, group norms, and interpersonal dynamics. A basic assumption of the human relations movement was that the manager’s concern for workers would lead to their increased satisfaction, which would in turn result in improved performance. Two writers who helped advance the human relations movement were Abraham Maslow and Douglas McGregor.  In 1943, Maslow advanced a theory suggesting that people are motivated by a hierarchy of needs, including monetary incentives and social acceptance.  Maslow’s hierarchy is perhaps the best-known human relations theory.

Meanwhile, Douglas McGregor’s Theory X and Theory Y model best represents the essence of the human relations movement.  According to McGregor, Theory X and Theory Y reflect two extreme belief sets that managers have about their workers. Theory X is a relatively negative view of workers and is consistent with the views of scientific management. Theory Y is more positive and represents the assumptions that human relations advocates make.  In McGregor’s view, Theory Y was a more appropriate philosophy for managers to adhere to. Both Maslow and McGregor notably influenced the thinking of many practicing managers.

Theory X Assumptions

  1. People do not like work and try to avoid it.
  2. People do not like work, so managers have to control, direct, coerce, and threaten

employees to get them to work towards organisational goals.

  1. People prefer to be directed, to avoid responsibility, and to want security; they have little ambition.

Theory Y Assumptions

  1. People do not naturally dislike work; work is a natural part of their lives.
  2. People are internally motivated to reach objectives to which they are committed.
  3. People are committed to goals to the degree that they receive personal rewards when they reach their objectives.
  4. People will both seek and accept responsibility under favourable conditions.
  5. People have the capacity to be innovative in solving organisational problems.
  6. People are bright, but under most organisational conditions their potentials are underutilised.

Contemporary Behavioural Science in Management

Munsterberg, Mayo, Maslow, McGregor, and others have made valuable contributions to management. Contemporary theorists, however, have noted that many assertions of the human relationists were simplistic and inadequate descriptions of work behaviour.  Current behavioural perspectives on management, known as organisational behaviour, acknowledge that human behaviour in organisations is much more complex than the human relationists realised.  The field of organisational behaviour draws from a broad, inter-disciplinary base of psychology, sociology, anthropology, economics, and medicine.

Organisational behaviour takes a holistic view of behaviour and addresses individual, group, and organisational processes. These processes are major elements in contemporary management theory.  Important topics in this field include job satisfaction, stress, motivation, leadership, group dynamics, organisational politics, interpersonal  conflict, and the structure and design of organisations.

Assessment of the Behavioural Perspective

The primary contributions of the behavioural perspective relate to ways in which this approach has changed managerial thinking.  Managers are now more likely to recognise the importance of behavioural processes and to view employees as valuable resources instead of mere tools. On the other hand, organisational behaviour is still imprecise in its ability to predict behaviour and is not always accepted or understood by practicing managers. Hence, the contributions of the behavioural school have yet to be fully realised.

management, leadership, management training

Organizing is that part of managing which involves establishing an intentional structure of roles for people to fill in the organization

5. Strategic management and organisational goals and understanding the key concepts

One of the most vitally important aspects of the management process involves strategic management.  Strategic management is the process by which an organisation develops and implements plans that espouse the goals and objectives of that organisation. The process of strategic management is a continuous one that changes as the organisational goals and objectives evolve. Small businesses engage in strategic management to ensure that they adapt to trends and external changes such as globalisation. Several key concepts characterise strategic management and the development of organisational goals. BOTI’s  leadership training programs for managers, leadership training workshops and leadership management courses will introduce you to the realms of strategic management and set you on your way to understanding this vitally important management concept.

Goal Setting

At the core of the strategic management process is the creation of goals, a mission statement, values and organisational objectives. Organisational goals, the mission statement, values and objectives guide the organisation in its pursuit of strategic opportunities. It is also through goal setting that managers make strategic decisions such as how to meet sales targets and achieve higher revenue generation. Through goal setting, organisations plan how to compete in an increasingly competitive and global business arena.

Analysis Strategy Formation

Analysis of an organisation’s strengths and weaknesses is a key concept of strategic management. Other than the internal analysis, an organisation also undertakes external analysis of factors such as emerging technology and new competition. Through internal and external analysis, the organisation creates goals and objectives that will turn weaknesses into strengths. These analyses also facilitate in strategising ways of adapting to changing technology and emerging markets.

Strategy Formation

Strategy formation is a concept that entails developing specific actions that will enable an organisation to meet its goals and objectives. Strategy formation entails using the information from the analyses, prioritising and making decisions on how to address key issues facing the organization. Additionally, through strategy formulation an organisation seeks to find ways of maximising profitability and maintaining a competitive advantage.

Strategy Implementation

Strategy implementation is putting the actual strategy into practice to meet organisational goals and objectives. The idea behind this concept is to gather all the available and necessary resources required to bring the strategic plan to life. Organisations implement strategies through creating budgets, programs and policies to meet financial, management, human resources and operational goals and objectives. For the successful implementation of a strategic plan, cooperation between management and other employees is absolutely necessary.

Strategy Monitoring

A final concept is monitoring of the strategy once it has been implemented. Strategy monitoring entails evaluating the strategy to determine if it yields the anticipated results as espoused in the organisational goals. Here, an organisation determines what areas of the plan to measure and the methods of measuring these areas, and then compares the anticipated results with the actual ones. Through monitoring, an organisation is able to understand when and how to adjust the plan to adapt to changing trends.

management. leadership, management training

Management is a systematic way of doing things

6. Strategic plans and the implementation process 

Effective implementation of strategic plans is essential for any organisation’s success.  Among recommended procedures are getting started early and creating consensus around the goals and objectives of strategic plans.

Effective implementation of strategic plans is essential to the success of any organisation, but it is not as simple as it looks. A 2018 management research study concluded that only 20 to 30 percent of corporate strategic plans are ever completed. For smaller businesses, it may just be inexperience with seeing them through.

Getting Started Early

Broad agreement exists among leadership and management professionals that implementation needs to begin as the strategic plan is created. Getting started early does several things: It introduces implementation language and concepts into corporate life in time for both to become a familiar and well-understood.

Commitment and Consensus

Getting employees, especially key personnel, to buy into the plan – to become fully committed to it early on – is essential. The implementation process begins with communicating the plan throughout the organisation. It needs to be made clear that the plan is consistent with the organisation’s vision and general business strategy and that the plan has broad approval from the board of directors to department managers. A frequent issue with the implementation of strategic plans is that middle managers, absent some clear and timely reinforcement to the contrary, often conclude that senior management no longer cares about implementing the plan. Another issue is that only about a quarter of corporations provide meaningful incentives for meeting strategic plan benchmarks and goals.

Paying the Costs

Nearly all strategic plans come with a cost. Yet, most strategic plans are rolled out without any direct connection to budgeting. An unfunded strategic plan is only a wishlist. Implementation requires an understanding of plan costs and institutional commitment to its funding. Plans need to come with funding in place.

Relation to External Conditions

Every strategic plan is responsive to external conditions, directly or indirectly. Changes in external conditions – the economy, supply costs, labor or other issues – can make the plan’s implementation unnecessary, no longer strategic or impossible to achieve. Acknowledgment of these parameters should be built into the plan’s rollout so that everyone knows that the plan includes responses to external conditions.

Every plan has objectives, but not all plans contain enough information about achieving them. Two common deficiencies are:

  • Establishment of benchmarks
  • Establishment of oversight practices

Establishing benchmarks and oversight practices are closely related. Oversight confirms that benchmarks are being achieved according to schedule. The presence of monitoring activities also sends employees a message that the plan is still in place and remains important.

Building in Updates and Revisions

One way of ensuring that a strategic plan continues to be relevant is to build periodic reviews of all the plan’s essential features into the implementation of the plan: goals, benchmarks and monitoring. A plan shouldn’t be evergreen; it needs to be viewed as a contemporary document. Strategic plans work best when they are time-limited, with a major review, often with a new rollout, at least once a year.

  • Here are some known issues with plan implementations:
    • Lack of reinforcement of long-term goals
    • Strategic plans treated as separate from daily operations
    • Plans that are overwhelming and need to be pruned to be made achievable
    • Insufficient progress reports: Achievement of benchmarks always needs to be noted.
    • Employees not given sufficient authority to implement the plan
    • Employees not given sufficient means to implement the plan

Tip

  • Using one of the strategic plan conception and implementation templates available on the internet removes a lot of uncertainty and makes it easier to benchmark and monitor plan progress. Some are free in exchange for your contact information; others have either a one-time fee or a monthly charge.

management, leadership, management training

Management is an integrated process

7. The Importance of Business Implementation and implementation strategies

Implementation

Whether a business is a start-up or already well established, business implementation becomes the responsibility of all the employees. Implementation is the process of executing a plan or policy so that a concept becomes a reality. To implement a plan properly, managers should communicate clear goals and expectations, and supply employees with the resources needed to help the company achieve its goals.  When you enrol on one of BOTI’s business courses, management training courses or management skills training courses you will discover so much more.

The implementation of a plan brings about change meant to help improve the company or solve a problem. The changes can occur to policies, management structures, organizational development, budgets, processes, products or services. Since the status quo can be detrimental to a company, change can help improve the work environment and/or the customer experience.

Organizational Development

Part of good organizational development involves including all employees in implemented changes. When a company shares its ideas and goals with workers, the workers will feel a sense of ownership and loyalty to the company, as well as feel included in something important that is larger than their respective job descriptions. Making workers feel valued also helps maintain or improve employee retention. Communicating goals to employees helps encourage participation and can give a plan a strong start.

Increased Cooperation

When executed properly, business implementation can increase interdepartmental cooperation. It can be easy for a department within a business to work independently and only rely on another department when a need arises, particularly in a large company. Business implementation helps unite departments, open the lines of communication, create a diverse culture within the organization and increase efficiency and productivity. Successful business implementation links performance factors with projects designed to develop and optimize individual and departmental activities.

Clear Priorities

As well as communicating goals, business implementation sets clear priorities. Priorities are generally based on due dates, client needs, financial concerns, worker needs or logistics. Deadlines help guarantee the implementation of a plan with realistic due dates, but a company must provide its workers with clear action steps and resources to ensure the success of the plan. Failure to communicate priorities can cause inefficiencies, miscommunications, worker frustration and low morale. When priorities or deadlines are realistic, employees feel as if a company is setting them up for success.

Moving Forward

Business implementation is important for moving a company forward. When a business fails to implement and execute its strategies properly, it fails to move forward and grow. According to website Business Balls, to implement and execute a plan successfully, there must be “motivational leadership,” a plan of action and “performance management.”

management, leadership, management training

Organizing is that part of managing which involves establishing an intentional structure of roles for people to fill in the organization

Business Implementation Strategies

To increase the effectiveness of new business ideas, you need to have efficient business implementation strategies. Formulating creative business ideas does you little good if you do not have a plan in place to properly execute them. In addition, a business’s organizational structure is strengthened when management spends time analyzing different ways to efficiently put new plans into place.

Get Staff and Management Involved

A business idea can start with any member of the staff, but getting the company to accept the implementation of a new idea requires the entire staff to be involved in some way with the planning. It is not necessary to take input from every individual, but you can get departmental managers involved in the process from the beginning, especially concerning how any major changes will affect their departments. These managers can then reach out to their staff and get the company involved in the implementation strategy, widening your scope and perspective in the process.

Invest in Training

To implement any new business idea effectively, invest in training at every phase of the process. For instance, at least 60 days prior to implementing a new business idea, training should focus on alerting your staff to the pending change then introduce how such changes will benefit the company. Continue training throughout the implementation period, and be prepared to take input from your employees as to how you can make the process smoother.

Consider Outside Factors

Implementing a new idea for your business could affect your vendors or customers. As you plan your implementation strategy, consider how any change, big or small, will affect the entities you do business with. Targeted market research of your clients and vendors can give you an indication of how your changes will affect business before you even implement them. Discuss your ideas with your largest vendors or clients to determine if you need to make any alterations to your plans.

Open Communication

Implementing change is easier if you allow free and open communication within your organization. Encourage employees to give their input about your proposed changes, and maintain an open communication policy throughout the implementation process.

How to create and implement a business plan

You won’t have to re-invent the wheel when you create a business plan for a new venture — many organisations offer tips, advice and even sample plans you can use to get started. To find out all you need to know about how to create and implement a business plan enrol now on one of BOTI’s business courses, business management short courses or management skills training courses.  Many institutions provide step-by-step instructions for writing business plans. To increase your chances for success, create a dynamic plan you can modify and update as you run your business. 

Basic guidelines for creating a business plan

1. Write an outline for your business plan. Start with broad sections, such as a company mission statement, product or service description, customer profile, competitor analysis, marketing, financial, staffing and legal concerns. Create sub-headings. For example, under marketing, you will include branding, advertising, public relations and promotions. Under advertising, you can list print, broadcast, outdoor, direct mail, social media and other forms of online marketing and any other appropriate methods. Under financial, include startup funding, cash-flow projections and the details of your budget.

2. Research each section to find expert advice on each. Include information such as how you will conduct market research or develop customer demographics. When creating your market research section, discuss what information you will need, what questions you will ask, how you will ask those questions or administer surveys and what your costs are likely to be.

3. Meet with an accountant to review your income and expense numbers, budget, record keeping and taxes. Meet with an attorney to make sure you address all permits and licenses you will need, and any health, safety or labour laws you will need to follow.

4. Create a dynamic business plan by providing several scenarios. For example, start with the current costs of goods you will need to buy to make your product or service, then add one or two more budgets based on those prices going up. For example, a restaurant might experience an increase in produce if there’s a drought or freeze, or labor, if the worker pool is seasonal, aging or leaving the area.  A business plan is not static and should be a work-in-progress.

5. Write an executive summary of the plan and place it at the beginning of the document. This will give potential investors and lenders an overview of the business plan and the results you expect. The executive summary should not contain any support for your statements — save that for the body of the plan.

6. Implement the plan by starting at the beginning and executing the various steps you’ve addressed in the plan. For example, you might need to incorporate your company, trademark your name, secure business licenses and permits, open a bank account, get a post office box and perform many other tasks that get you ready to open your doors. This will include more complicated actions, such as shopping for vendors, hiring staff, developing marketing materials and creating promotions.

7. Review your business plan on a regular basis. Compare budgeted numbers to actual figures of doing business. Determine whether you can keep operating as you are, of if you need to make changes, such as reducing costs, raising prices or increasing marketing activities.

Management is a systematic way of doing things

 

Events Management Expertise

Events Management Expertise

Minor events don’t always take place at the office.  There are times when teams will be required to be offsite for many different reasons such as team building exercises, workshops, conferences, specialized meetings, promotional campaigns, client entertainment functions, golf days and training exercises.  In these circumstances the general idea is to ensure that over and above the necessary travel and accommodation arrangements, all delegates are provided with the normal facilities that they have become accustomed to at the office.

This practical course will introduce you to the art of events co-ordination.  You will learn how to effectively liaise with meeting or event attendees regarding availability and final arrangements whilst observing specific individual needs such as special dietary requirements; make travel and accommodation and car hire arrangements, identify a suitable date, time and venue, book catering and venue as well as process and distribute any documentation that may be required for the event.

BOTI offers secretarial training programmes, marketing courses and events training.  Book your seat now on BOTI’s Events Management Expertise course.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

Course duration

2 days

In any event, you will excel when you learn how to:

  • Make travel, car hire and accommodation arrangements.
  • Identify a date, venue and time for the meeting or event.
  • Process and distribute all documentation required for the meeting or event.
  • Liaise and/or negotiate with meeting or event attendees regarding availability.
  • Book venues and catering.
  • Finalise meeting room arrangements.
  • Notify and confirm arrangements with attendees, delegates or stakeholders.
  • Confirm final arrangements with attendees, delegates or stakeholders.

BOTI offers secretarial training programmes, marketing courses and events training.  Book your seat now on BOTI’s Events Management Expertise course.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

Benefits of attending:  Events management expertise course

Upon successful completion of this course you will have acquired an in-depth understanding of how to manage and event and will have developed your skills in the following areas:

  • Arrange a date, time and venue for the event based on responses to range of dates provided.
  • Book and confirm meeting/event to all attendees in writing.
  • Forward all event related documentation to attendees.
  • Arrange venue and catering requirements taking into account any religious and special dietary requirements.
  • Forward agenda for the event to venue provider and caterers to ensure that correct times for means and breaks are incorporated.
  • Make travel, car hire and accommodation arrangements.
  • Process invoices relating to travel, car hire and accommodation.
  • Process relevant advance disbursements for travel, car hire and accommodation.
  • Assemble and distribute documentation for the event to all attendees timeously.

BOTI offers secretarial training programmes, marketing courses and events training.  Book your seat now on BOTI’s Events Management Expertise course.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

Who is this course suitable for?

This course is aimed at those individuals who are involved in a secretarial, administrative or marketing function and who are responsible for co-ordinating small events.

This Unit Standard course is aligned to Unit Standard 13929:  Co-ordinate meetings, minor events and travel arrangements

Testimonials

Nomakhosi Khoza – Multichoice (Pty) Ltd

‘I gained good knowledge on how to prepare different types of events.  All went very well as Lynnaire was very clear on each topic and made me understand things need to be done.  The best thing about this course was one on one undivided attention.’

Public Course Schedule and Costs

Please click on link below for related public course/s:
There are no upcoming events at this time.
You might also enjoy:  Powerful Project Management (as a project team member)

Organizational Ethics & Conduct Training

Mastering Service Level Agreements and Contracts

BOTI offers secretarial training programmes, marketing courses and events training.  Book your seat now on BOTI’s Events Management Expertise course.  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

Apply a range of project management tools and techniques

Apply a range of project management tools and techniques

(This Unit Standard course is aligned to: Further Education and Training Certificate: Project Management)

SAQA I.D. 50080 NQF Level: NQF Level 04

Unit Standard: 120385

Number of credits:  7

Introduction

Get the project management certification and project management qualifications you need to move forward.  Enrol now on pmp certification or book your seat on BOTI’s Unit Standard course: Apply a range of project management tools and techniques course. BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

Course outline

  • Learners accessing this standard will be involved in project management teams or involved in building small project management teams. These projects may be technical projects, business projects or developmental projects and will cut across a range of economic sectors. This standard will also add value to learners who are running their own business and recognise that project management forms an integral component of any business.
  • Learners accessing this standard will be working as a leader in the context of a small project / sub-project involving few resources and having a limited impact on stakeholders and the environment or working as a contributing team member on a medium to large project when not a leader.

The qualifying learner is capable of:

  • Applying corrective action steps where project management tools and techniques usage problems occur.
  • Demonstrating an understanding of project management tools.
  • Using a range of project management tools.

Get the project management certification and project management qualifications you need to move forward.  Enrol now on pmp certification or book your seat on BOTI’s Unit Standard course: Apply a range of project management tools and techniques course. BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

Prior learning requirements

  • Learners accessing this qualification will have demonstrated competence in mathematics and communication skills at NQF level 4 or equivalent.
  • Learners accessing this qualification will have demonstrated competence in computer literacy and applicable software at NQF level 4 or equivalent.
  • ID 120372 – Explain fundamentals of project management.

Unit standard range

  • Policies and procedures may be organisation specified systems, policies and procedures or where these do not exist, accepted industry best practice.
  • Project level may include but is not limited to working as a leader in the context of a small project / sub-project involving few resources and having a limited impact on stakeholders and the environment or working as a contributing team member on a medium to large project when not a leader.
  • Projects may include but are not limited to all projects including technical, developmental and business related projects.
  • Tools are tangible such as a computer, spreadsheet program, template.

Get the project management certification and project management qualifications you need to move forward.  Enrol now on pmp certification or book your seat on BOTI’s Unit Standard course: Apply a range of project management tools and techniques course. BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

  • Techniques are systematic procedures using one or more tools to produce a deliverable.
  • The range of project management tools and techniques may include but are not limited to Gantt charts, network diagramming, spreadsheets, budget administration, documentation management, e-mail and internet usage and word processing, presentations, desktop calendar, computerized applications (software).
  • Project tools may include but are not limited to tools where only knowledge is required to support a project manager.

 

Course outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of project management tools and techniques.
  • Use a range of project management tools and techniques.
  • Apply corrective action steps where project management tools and techniques usage problems occur

 

Get the project management certification and project management qualifications you need to move forward.  Enrol now on pmp certification or book your seat on BOTI’s Unit Standard course: Apply a range of project management tools and techniques course. BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa.

Apply a range of project management tools and techniques

SAQA I.D. 50080 NQF Level: NQF Level 04

Unit Standard: 120385

Course duration

3 days

 

Who should attend: Apply a range of project management tools and techniques course

This course is aimed at those aspiring towards or already engaged in activities involving project management and will also add value to those who are running their own business and recognise that project management forms an integral component of any business.

BOTI also offers:  Further Education and Training Certificate: Project Management

Read, analyse and respond to a variety of texts

Engage in sustained oral communication and evaluate spoken texts

 

QUALIFICATIONS UTILISING THIS UNIT STANDARD:

 

  ID QUALIFICATION TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL STATUS END DATE PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QA FUNCTIONARY
Fundamental 50080 Further Education and Training Certificate: Project Management Level 4 NQF Level 04 Reregistered 2018-06-30 SERVICES

 

**Quote does not include Any Exam Fees (if applicable)

IMPORTANT ACTION: Do Not Wait To Improve Your Skills.  

Book Now By Completing Online Booking Form / Customised Proposal or Obtain Approval For Your Already Received Customised Proposal

 

 

Salarisstelsel kursusse – Verfyn jou vaardighede – Sage Pastel Salarisstelsel kursus

Salarisstelsel kursusse – Pastel Salarisstelsel kursus – Inleiding: Salarisstelsel kursusse: Sage Pastel Salarisstelsel Administrasie Sertifisering Opleidingskursus

Hierdie Sage Pastel Salarisstelsel kursus of salarisstelsel kursus leer afgevaardigdes truuks en vaardighede wat kan gebruik word om te sorg dat hul besigheid guns trek uit hul salarisstelsel sagteware.

 

Salarisstelsel kursusse (Sage Pastel Salarisstelsel kursus) verskaf die individu met die vaardighede om te verstaan hoe salarisstelsel stelsels werk en prakties ‘n stelsel bedryf. ‘N doeltreffende salarisstelsel is noodsaaklik vir enige organisasie van ‘n voldoening oogpunt sowel as uit ‘n onderneming oogpunt. Dis vanselfsprekend dat ‘n onbetaalde werknemer nie baie gelukkig sal wees nie!

 

Payroll Courses: Sage Pastel Payroll Administration Certification Training Course

Salarisstelsel kursusse: Sage Pastel Salarisstelsel Administrasie Sertifisering Opleidingskursus

 

 

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Uiteensetting: Sage Pastel Salarisstelsel Administrasie Sertifisering Opleidingskursus

Johannesburg (Sandton), Kaapstad, Durban, Port Elizabeth, Pretoria – Suid-Afrika

Belangrike uitkomste van die kursus sluit in:
• Hoe om effektief ‘n salarisstelsel kantoor te bedryf
• Gebruik van Sage Pastel salarisstelsel tot sy volste potensiaal
• Leer hoe om behoorlik werknemers te belas
• Hoe om te rapporteer op Sage Salarisstelsels

sage pastel payroll training

 

Kursus duur en gelde: Salarisstelsel kursusse: Sage Pastel Salarisstelsel Administrasie Sertifisering Opleidingskursus

Ons twee dag opleiding kursus is so ontwerp dat die kennis verkry in prakties toegepas word sodat die sake-omgewing kan verbeter word.
Raadpleeg Bylae vir kursus koste of kontak BOTI vir ‘n kwotasie.

Aanbevole vooraf ondervinding en kennis:

Salarisstelsel kursusse: Sage Pastel Salarisstelsel Administrasie Sertifisering Opleidingskursus

Die kursus (Salarisstelsel kursusse: Sage Pastel Salarisstelsel Administrasie Sertifisering Opleiding kursus) is ontwerp vir die volgende bywoners:

  • Afgevaardigdes wat ‘n sertifikaat in Sage salarisstelsel Administrasie wil kry.
    Vir die Salarisstelsel kursusse: Sage Pastel Salarisstelsel Administrasie Sertifisering Opleidingskursus, is dit raadsaam dat jy die volgende ervaring/kennis het:
    • NKR vlak 3 rekenaargeletterdheid, geletterdheid en gesyferdheid.

For English Version click here

Related Public Course Schedule and Costs

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Book Now or Obtain Instant Quote

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View Calendar for the latest course
 

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Please Fill in the Form – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

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Lei die Afrigter Opleidingskursus

Inleiding: Lei die Afrigter Opleiding Kursus

Lei die afrigter is ‘n volledige kursus wat afgevaardigdes leer hoe om kennis oor te dra aan volwassenes op die mees effektiewe manier. Afgevaardigdes sal die vaardighede bemeester en getoetste metodes van leer om geleer te word en hoe om dit in hul opleidingsessies toe te pas. Ons Lei die Afrigter Kursus (Lei die afrigter kursus Suid-Afrika) mik om ‘n groep opleiers die nodige vaardighede te leer om organisatoriese onderrig in ‘n effektiewe en samehangende wyse oor te dra sodat organisatoriese doelwitte bereik word.
Time Management Skills Training Course

 

Uiteensetting: Lei die Afrigter Opleidingskursus

Johannesburg (Sandton), Kaapstad, Durban, Port Elizabeth, Pretoria – Suid-Afrika

Belangrike uitkomste van die Lei die afrigter kursus Suid-Afrika sluit in:

  • om opleiding en onderrig te koppel
  • Definieer die hob
  • Hoe om opleiding aan te bied
  • Verkryging van voorbereiding
  • Begrip van vormkonstantheid opleiding asook fasilitering
  • Versamel materiale
  • Maak van ‘n lesplan
  • Keuse van aktiwiteite
  • Voorbereiding vir die program
  • Begin op die regte voet
  • Aflewering wenke asook truuks
  • Werk met uitdagende afgevaardigdes
  • Hanteer moeilike onderwerpe

Voordele: Lei die Afrigter kursus Suid-Afrika

Hoekom is lei die afrigter opleiding nodig?

Dwarsdeur ‘n Lei die afrigter kursus, word interne instrukteurs maniere geleer om kursusse en werkswinkels te voorsien. Onder die mees tipiese keuses,  maar nietemin, is die verskaffing van interne of eksterne opleiding. ‘N paar sakeondernemings het eintlik selfs interne opleidingsprogramme gevestig wat geleer is deur hul eie personeel. Immers, maak dit goeie sin om opleiers aan te wend wat tans die organisasie verstaan, dit is kultuur en werkers, reg?

Ongelukkig, maar nietemin, dit is nie so basies soos dit nie. Terwyl hierdie opleiers die tegniese vermoëns het, kan hulle in werklikheid leer?

Metodes om jou personeel op te lei

Besigheid het vandag het talle keuses om hul arbeid krag te ontwikkel. ‘N paar van hulle verskaf betaalde tyd uit sodat werkers kan gaan vir opleidingskursusse, ander reël naweek werkswinkels. Om die span lid dop te hou, monitering deur lyn toesighouers, en netwerke vorm is ander gewilde metodes wat ʼn onderneming benut om hul personeel op te lei.

Deur die gebruik van hierdie tegniek, kan besighede vinnig n groep opleiers ontwikkel en opleiding pogings kan baie vinniger voltooi word. Die piramide impak van die Lei die afrigter ontwerp impliseer ook meer individue kan opgelei word in veel minder tyd en teen ‘n laer vooruit koste. Maar dis nie al nie, ander voordele bestaan uit:

Eindig op as ʼn werkgewer van keuse

  • Beter werknemer retensie
  • Afsien van hoogs geteikende opleiding
  • Werkplek aftyd word verminder
  • Vaardighede word oor gedra

Om ‘n interne afrigter te he impliseer jou personeel het hul eie individuele instrukteur wat sessies in die werksomgewing kan hou. Deur opleiding aan te pas rondom bestaande personeel roosters, word  organisasie onderbreking voorkom. Interne opleiding impliseer ook geen reiskoste, hotel besprekings of parkering kostes nie.

Met Lei die Afrigter kursusse, kan organisasies ‘n groep van industrie-Gevorderde, gefokuste instrukteurs ontwikkel en handhaaf om te help om organisatoriese prestasie verbeter.

Kursus duur en gelde: Lei die Afrigter Opleidingskursus

Ons twee dag Lei die afrigter kursus Suid-Afrika is ontwerp sodat die kennis verkry in prakties  toegepas kan word sodat die sake-omgewing verbeter kan word.

Raadpleeg Bylae vir kursus koste of kontak BOTI vir ‘n kwotasie.

Aanbevole vooraf ondervinding en kennis: Lei die Afrigter Opleidingskursus (Lei die Afrigter kursus)

Die kursus (Lei die Afrigter Opleidingskursus) is ontwerp vir die volgende bywoners:

  • Afgevaardigdes wat wil oefen as fasiliteerders in ‘n opleiding omgewing.

Vir die Lei die Afrigter Opleidingskursus, is dit raadsaam dat jy die volgende ervaring/kennis het:

  • Geen

Upcoming Public Courses

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New Manager and Middle Manager

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Tyd Bestuur Vaardigheid Opleidingskursus: Tyd Bestuur Opleiding

Tyd Bestuur Vaardighede Opleidingskursus of Tyd Bestuur Opleiding: die Bestuur van Tyd Vaardighede Opleidingskursus bied die vaardighede aan om hul persoonlike en besigheid tyd probleme te ontleed. Dit laat afgevaardigdes toe om oplossings te kies en te implementeer wat hul posisies en werk-style pas. Dit sal hulle help met vergadering werk en persoonlike sperdatums.

 


Time Management Skills Training Course

 

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Die uitdaging op Johannesburg (Sandton), Kaapstad, Durban, Port Elizabeth, Pretoria – Suid-Afrika

Tyd bestuur vaardighede is noodsaaklik sakevernuf omdat:

o tyd beperk is

o kom meer te wete

o Verminder stres

o hoër kwaliteit werk

o Dit skep dissipline

o Bereik meer met minder moeite

o beter besluite

o word meer suksesvol

 

Die oplossing (Tyd Bestuur Vaardighede Opleidingskursus: Johannesburg (Sandton), Kaapstad, Durban, Port Elizabeth, Pretoria – Suid-Afrika)

Die uitkomste van die kursus (Tyd Bestuur Vaardighede Opleidingskursus) poog om kandidate die vaardighede te leer van:

o Ontvangs en vaslegging van dagboek inligting aanlyn, of verwerk dit per hand.

o Skeduleer tyd om take te voltooi volgens spesifieke teikendatums en verslagdoening van onvolledige aktiwiteite op tyd.

o Beplanning en volging van ‘n werk skedule.

Ander areas geleer, sluit die volgende in:

 

 

  • Skep, gebruik en handhaaf ‘n taaklys. Die waarde van die gebruik en instandhouding van ‘n taaklys is bekend gemaak en ingevolge ‘n spesifieke werk konteks verstaan. Stappe of fases word geïdentifiseer. Inligting en dokumentasie vereis word vasgelê. Bykomende inligting wat ontvang is word vasgelê aanlyn of per hand verwerk. Voltooide take word aan die toepaslike owerheid gerapporteer
  • Gebruik en handhaaf ‘n dagboek. Die doel van die behoud van ‘n persoonlike dagboek as ‘n self-bestuur instrument. Relevante inligting word aangeteken. Dagboek inskrywings word gebruik om ‘n aksieplan te skep
  • Prioritiseer take. Take is geïdentifiseer om ten einde ʼn taaklys op te stel . Take word gesorteer en geprioritiseer daarvolgens. Tyd nodig om take te voltooi is geskeduleer om tyd toe te laat om te voldoen aan sperdatums

 

Opleiding benadering (Tyd Bestuur Vaardighede Opleidingskursus)

Ons twee dag opleiding kursus is so ontwerp dat die kennis verkry in prakties toegepas word sodat die sake-omgewing kan verbeter.

Die kursus het ‘n sterk fokus op ‘n uitkoms gebaseerde benadering en is aangebied om groep deelname en betrokkenheid aan te moedig. Sleutel meganismes gebruik sluit in:

 

  • Rolspel
  • Prakties betrokke oefeninge
  • Toesprake en aanbiedings
  • Span sessies
  • Praktiese demonstrasies
  • Vraelyste
  • Besprekings en
  • Geval voorbeelde

Alle afgevaardigdes (vir Tyd Bestuur Vaardighede Opleidingskursus: Johannesburg (Sandton), Kaapstad, Durban, Port Elizabeth, Pretoria – Suid-Afrika) sal ontvang:

  • Materiaal, verversings (middagete, tee), na opleiding hulp vir 3 maande (Tyd Bestuur Vaardighede Opleidingskursus)
  • Geheue stokkie (met toepaslike gereedskap en modelle wat maklik verkry kan word wanneer dit toegepas word terug by die werk) (Tyd Bestuur Vaardighede Opleidingskursus)

Tyd Bestuur Vaardighede Opleidingskursus is ‘n noodsaaklike vaardigheid.

 

Upcoming Public Courses

Leadership Mastering Emotional Intelligence, Refining Interpersonal Skills & Dealing with Conflict Resolution


There are no upcoming events at this time.

Closing Gaps between Supervisor and New Manager

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New Manager and Middle Manager

There are no upcoming events at this time.

 

 

Book Now or Obtain Instant Quote

We also offer customized courses across the country: Anytime, Anywhere. Click on the link to get get instant proposal or book you course:

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Contemporary Management Issues and Challenges


 

business management courses, leadership training courses or business administration courses

Contemporary Management Issues and Challenges

Managers today face an imposing set of challenges as they guide and direct the fortunes of their companies. Coverage of each topic, introduced next, is thoroughly integrated throughout this book.  Enrol on one of BOTI’s business management courses, leadership training courses or business administration courses and learn more about what managers face in today’s business climate.

Downsizing

One major management challenge that is all too common today is downsizing, which occurs when an organization purposely becomes smaller by reducing the size of the workforce or by shedding entire divisions or businesses. From around the mid-1980s through today, it has become commonplace for firms to announce the elimination of thousands of jobs. For example, in recent years General Motors, IBM, and AT&T have undergone major downsizing efforts involving thousands of employees. Even some Japanese firms-long thought to be immune to this challenge have had to downsize as a result of problems in the Japanese economy. Organizations going through such downsizing have to be concerned about managing the effects of these cutbacks, not only for those who are being let go, but also for those who are surviving-albeit surviving with a reduced level of job security.

Diversity and the New Work Force

A second important challenge today is the management of diversity. Diversity refers to differences among people. Although diversity may be reflected along numerous dimensions, most managers tend to focus on age, gender, ethnicity, and physical abilities/disabilities. The internationalization of businesses has also increased diversity in many organizations, carrying with it additional challenges as well as new opportunities. Motivating employees from different age categories, from senior citizens to Generation X-ers, is a related issue.

Information Technology

New technology, especially as it relates to information, also poses an increasingly important management challenge. The Internet and World Wide Web, local area networks and intranets, and the increased use of e-mail and voicemail systems are among the most recent technological changes in this area. Among the key issues associated with information technology are employee privacy, decision-making quality, and optimizing a firm’s investments in new forms of technology as they continue to emerge. A related issue confronting managers has to do with the increased capabilities this technology provides for people to work at places other than their office.

New Ways of Managing

Another important management challenge today is the complex array of new ways of managing. As noted earlier, theorists once advocated “one best way” of managing. These approaches generally relied on rigidly structured hierarchies with power controlled at the top and rules, policies, and procedures governing most activities. Now, however, many managers are seeking greater flexibility and the ability to respond more quickly to the environment. Thus, organizations today are often characterized by few levels of management, broad, wide spans of management, and fewer rules and regulations. The increased use of work teams also goes hand-in-hand with this new approach to
managing.

Globalization

Globalization is yet another significant contemporary challenge for managers. Managing in a global economy poses many different challenges and opportunities. For example, at a macro level, property ownership arrangements vary widely. So does the availability of natural resources and components of the infrastructure, as well as the role of government in business. Another important consideration is how behavioral processes vary widely across cultural and national boundaries. For example, values, symbols, and beliefs differ sharply among cultures. Different work norms and the role work plays in a person’s life can influence patterns of both work-related behavior and attitudes toward work. They also affect the nature of supervisory relationships, decision-making styles and processes, and organizational configurations.

Ethics and Social Responsibility

Another management challenge that has taken on renewed importance is ethics and social responsibility. Scandals in organizations ranging from Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc. (stock market fraud) to Beech-Nut (advertising baby apple juice as being 100 percent pure when it was really chemically extended) to the Japanese firm Recruit (bribery of government officials) have made headlines around the world. From the social responsibility angle, increasing attention has been focused on pollution and business’s obligation to help clean up our environment, business contributions to social causes, and so forth.

Managing for Quality

Quality also poses an important management challenge today. Quality is an important issue for several reasons. First, more and more organizations are using quality as a basis for competition. Second, enhancing quality lowers costs. Whistler Corporation recently found that it was using 100 of its 250 employees to repair defective radar detectors that were built incorrectly the first time. Quality is also important because of its
relationship to productivity

Service Economy

Finally, the shift toward a service economy also continues to be important. Traditionally, most businesses were manufacturers-they used tangible resources like raw materials and machinery to create tangible products like automobiles and steel. In recent years, however, the service sector of the economy has become much more important. Indeed, services now account for well over half of the gross domestic product in the United States and play a similarly important role in many other industrialized nations as well.

Service technology involves the use of both tangible resources (such as machinery) and intangible resources (such as intellectual property) to create intangible services (such as a hair cut, insurance protection, or transportation between two cities). While there are obviously many similarities between managing in a manufacturing and a service
organization, there are also many fundamental differences.

 

Workplace Violence Course

Workplace Violence Course: Introduction

Workplace violence is a very serious matter. We invite participants to our workplace violence workshop and teach them the skills to recognise a potentially violent conflict, the skills to mediate a potentially violent conflict and what to do both on the spot and legally after such an incident has occurred.

Workplace Violence Course :Course Outline

Left unchecked workplace harassment can escalate into workplace violence. We addressed workplace harassment in our workshop on workplace harassment and we strongly urge participants who attend the harassment workshop to attend this workshop as well, since the two overlap each other. We examined the definition of harassment, as well as the employer’s responsibilities and the recourses available to victims in that workshop, in this workshop we will learn the implications harassment and violence have to business costs, the legal consequences if an employee should sue a company and the psychological repercussions. As the saying goes: An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. It is worthwhile knowing what normal behaviour is and what is not, however mental health is very subjective to the lay-man, and we should never try to diagnose our colleagues. Bullies and people with personality disorders don’t always check all the boxes and it would be wrong to make sweeping allegations against people with or without psychological disorders. Very often people with mental health issues are the victims of violence or harassment, and seventy percent of bullying is perpetrated by women against other women. Having said that, there are common distinguishing behaviours that have no place in the workplace and can only lead to a hostile working environment, such as: Non conformance to laws, policies or authority, incessant deceit, disregarding their own safety and that of others, irresponsibility, arrogance, exploiting fellow employees, a sense of entitlement, self-importance, jealousy, belittling others and spreading gossip and rumours. It is important to target the behaviour and not the person, difficult as it may be. Part of that ounce of prevention is implementing an action plan to discourage and root out harassment and violence from the workplace and to ensure that all employees are aware and trained in company policy. Companies conduct risk assessment for various reasons, in this workshop we will focus on risk of harassment and violence. We will discuss anger and aggression, the de-escalation or defusing strategies when faced with a violent occurrence. Communication skills and tactical options, the risk assessment will cover identifying the hazard, assessing the risk, controlling the risk and evaluation and review of the incident.TIP: Employer’s checklist: The four step process – List the risks of taking or not taking action Determine the severity, the likelihood and possibility of early detection Prioritise the risks Develop action plan and assign responsibility Employers should make all employees aware of the company policy on harassment and violence and if it changes all employees should be made aware of changes. The company policy on violence should be included in its code of ethics. We wrap our course up with a module on identifying bullies in the interview process, the investigation process of a violent incident and the scope and philosophy of a policy on violence and harassment. 1. Introduction
Workshop objectives

2. What is workplace harassment
Identifying harassment
Cost to business
Legal
Psychological
Case study

3. Identifying the bully
Abusive workplace behaviours
Bullying and personality disorders
Narcissism
Case study

4. How to handle workplace violence
Types of behaviour
Target the behaviour, not the person
Implement an action plan
Case study

5. Risk assessment
Understanding anger and aggression
Defusing and De-escalating situations
Communication skills
Tactical options
Case study

6. Risk Assessment (2)
Identifying the hazard
Addressing the risk
Controlling the risk
Evaluating and review
Case study

7. Being the victim
What is not considered bullying
Steps to take
Case study

8. Checklist for employers
4 Steps Process
Addressing all employees
Code of ethics
Policy and procedure
Case study

9. Interview Process
Identifying a bully
Warning signs
Case study

10. Investigation process
Advising your supervisor
Lodging the complaint
Initial response
The Investigation
Finding
Review and closure
Case study

11. Developing a harassment policy
Scope and philosophy
Principles
Intent
Options
Informal complaint process
Formal Investigation Process
Case study

12. Topics not discussed
Lessons learned
Post workshop overview

Workplace Violence Course: Course Duration

1 day/s

Who should attend: Workplace Violence Course

This course is intended for anyone who works in human resources.

**Quote does not include Any Exam Fees (if applicable)

IMPORTANT ACTION: Do Not Wait To Improve Your Skills.  

Book Now By Completing Online Booking Form / Customised Proposal or Obtain Approval For Your Already Received Customised Proposal

Procurement Supply Chain Management Training – BOTi Advanced Course

Procurement Supply Chain Management Training: Course Introduction

All business, at it’s core, is a matter of supply meeting customer demand… All successful businesses do this effectively and efficiently. This course is an asset for any business wanting to improve their Supply Chain Management.

Our course in Supply chain Management is intended to give employees and managers the skills to lower production costs, improve efficiency and increase productivity. All of these things equal greater customer satisfaction.

 (Procurement And Supply Chain Management Courses, Procurement Conference, Strategic Sourcing Training, Supply Chain Short Course, Procurement Officer Training)

Procurement Supply Chain Management Training: Course Outline

Supply chain management can be summarised as the management of interconnected businesses involved in providing goods or services to consumers. It involves the finances, logistics and delivery of products or services and necessitates integrated conduct and co-operation among the chain’s respective firms to be successful.

Key outcomes of the course include:

BOTi’s Program Outline  (Procurement And Supply Chain Management Courses, Procurement Conference, Strategic Sourcing Training, Supply Chain Short Course, Procurement Officer Training)

 

Component 1: Starting Out

  1. – Activities to break the ice
  2. – Housekeeping matters and administration
  3. – The Parking Area
  4. – program Objectives

Component 2: Why Supply Chain Management?

  1. – Customer Satisfaction
  2. – Enhancing Performance
  3. – Lowering Costs
  4. – Product Development
  5. – Training Example

– Component 2: Assessment Queries

Component 3: Essential Terms (I)

  1. – Procurement
  2. – Upstream as well as Downstream
  3. – Raw Material
  4. – Forecasting
  5. – Carrying Cost
  6. – Training Example

– Component 3: Assessment Queries

Component 4: Essential Terms (II)

  1. – Inventory
  2. – Order Generation
  3. – Order Taking
  4. – Order Fulfilment
  5. – Returns Management
  6. – Training Example
  7. – Component 4: Assessment Queries

Component 5: 3 Levels of Supply Chain Management

  1. – Strategic level
  2. – Tactical level
  3. – Operational Level
  4. – Bullwhip influence
  5. – Training Example
  6. – Component 5: Assessment Queries

Component 6: 5 Stages of Supply Chain Management

  1. – Plan
  2. – Deliver
  3. – Source
  4. – Make
  5. – Return
  6. – Training Example

– Component 6: Assessment Queries

Component 7: The Flows of Supply Chain Management

  1. – The Information Flow
  2. – Data Warehouses
  3. – The Product Flow
  4. – The Finances Flow
  5. – Training Example

– Component 7: Assessment Queries

Component 8: Inventory Management

  1. – Levels of Inventory
  2. – Just-In-Time Inventory
  3. – Keeping Accurate Records
  4. – Inventory Calculator
  5. – Training Example

– Component 8: Assessment Queries

Component 9: Supply Chain Groups

  1. – The Suppliers
  2. – The Producers
  3. – The Customers
  4. – The Customer’s Customer’s
  5. – Training Example

– Component 9: Assessment Queries

Component 10: Tracking as well as Monitoring

  1. – Dashboard
  2. – RFID’s
  3. – Alert Generation
  4. – Stock Keeping Unit (SKU)
  5. – Training Example

– Component 10: Assessment Queries

Component 11: Supply Chain Event Management

  1. – Inventory Alerts
  2. – Supplier Alerts
  3. – Bottlenecking
  4. – Being Proactive
  5. – Training Example

Component 11: Assessment Queries

Component 12: Concluding

  1. – Wise Men’s words
  2. – Assessment of Parking Area
  3. – Key Learnings
  4. – Evaluations as well as Completion Of activity Plans

Procurement Supply Chain Management Training: Course Duration

2 day/s

Procurement Supply Chain Management Training Course: Who should attend

(Procurement And Supply Chain Management Courses, Procurement Conference, Strategic Sourcing Training, Supply Chain Short Course, Procurement Officer Training)

This course is a Managerial course and is perfectly suited for those supervising the production process.

**Quote does not include Any Exam Fees (if applicable)

IMPORTANT ACTION: Do Not Wait To Improve Your Skills.  

Book Now By Completing Online Booking Form / Customised Proposal or Obtain Approval For Your Already Received Customised Proposal

 

Don’t delay. Skill up at BOTi Today.

Collaboration – How do we all write together? – Collaborative Business Writing Course

Collaboration – How do we all write together? – Collaborative Business Writing

“We are only as strong as we are united, as weak as we are divided.”J.K. Rowling

This workshop  Collaborative Business Writing Course follows on directly from the Business Writing workshop previously presented by boti.co.za  In this workshop, the focus will be on collaboration in writing agendas; reports; proposals and other missives which require input from more than one department. At the end of the workshop you and your colleagues will be able to form a team to work on a project and because everybody knows and uses the same skills, the end product will comprehensive and coherent. That is what the workshop (Collaborative Business Writing Course) is about in its condensed form, but allow us to elaborate and tell you in more detail what the workshop contains.Collaborative Business Writing Course

Let’s clarify the objective. Collaborative business writing is simply as a project or a piece of work created by multiple people. After each member of the team has finished their part, an editor or group leader assembles the finished project. We will discuss in detail the methods and strategies best used for collaborative writing, for example one team may choose to do sequential writing on a project while another may choose the integrated method. It may sound a little like Greek, but it’s simply a question of are we going to write the project as sections are finished or are we all going to write in each section?

We then turn our attention to the construction of the project, in the Collaborative Business Writing Course and the methods at our disposal, one being parallel construction. After that we explore one of the most important components of collaborative writing and that is choosing the right team members with the right characteristics. The team must consist of team players, not people who prefer to work on their own or that will become the first problem of the project. We will teach you how to build a successful team and what to do with enablers, who are essential to any multiple person project.

We move on to the practical side and ways to effectively use tools to get everybody on the same page. We learn about story boards, collaborative revision and team cohesion.

TIP:  A good team leader will:

  • Keep the project from going over the deadline.
  • Define the tasks for other team members.
  • Enhance group communication and keep track of time limits.
  • Mediate conflicts and disagreements.

Nearing the end of the Collaborative Business Writing Course, we address overcoming conflicts and obstacles to the project and discuss ways in which these can be managed such as T-shaped management. We also discuss keeping people and problems separate and we go back to effective communication by refreshing the participants mind’s about listening first and talking second. We end the Collaborative Business Writing Course with practical examples of collaborative writing.

CONTACT US NOW!

Please consult the following link for more details on the Collaborative Business Writing Course or to reserve

your spot in this workshop please contact 011 882 8853.

For an in-depth look at what other courses we offer click on our secure website boti.co.za  or alternatively view our latest course schedules.

BOTI offers a number of topic related Courses, please click on link.

Book Now! View Calendar for the latest course

 

 

AutoCAD Plant 3D Essentials Training Course

Introduction: AutoCAD Plant 3D Essentials Training Course

. The Autocad Plant 3d Essential Training: Admin Classes (or Autocad Plant 3d Training South Africa, Johannesburg, Cape Town, Pretoria, Durban) dealing with AutoCAD® Plant 3D is software that is designed around by industry specifications, it allows one to utilize existing content and designs, and produce and share construction documents which may include orthographics, isometrics. You will gain knowledge to use AutoCAD® Plant 3D to produce and amend a 3D plant design. You will also obtain two dimensional views of the three dimensional design.

Autocad Plant 3d Essential Training: Admin Classes (or Autocad Plant 3d Training South Africa, Johannesburg, Cape Town, Pretoria, Durban)

Master Computer Plant Design

In the practice of design, the ideal work environment enables one to spend energy to ensure that the design meets or exceeds the requirements. Because a plant is operated and constructed in a real 3 dimensional world, the best way of producing the design is in 3 dimensions.

 

AutoCAD Plant 3D Essentials Training Course

Outline: AutoCAD Plant 3D Essentials Training Course

Johannesburg (Sandton), Cape Town, Durban, Port Elizabeth, Pretoria – South Africa

Key outcomes of the Autocad Plant 3d Essential Training: Admin Classes (or Autocad Plant 3d Training South Africa, Johannesburg, Cape Town, Pretoria, Durban)  include:
• Introduction to AutoCAD Plant 3D and AutoCAD P&ID, Creating Project Folders and Drawings
• Steel Modelling and Editing
• Equipment Modeling and Editing
• Piping Basics
• Working with P&ID Data in Plant 3D
• Piping Editing and Advanced Topic

 

 

Course duration and fees: AutoCAD Plant 3D Essentials Training Course

Our two day Autocad Plant 3d Essential Training: Admin Classes (or Autocad Plant 3d Training South Africa, Johannesburg, Cape Town, Pretoria, Durban) is designed so that the knowledge acquired is applied practically, so that the business environment can be enhanced.

Please consult schedule for course costs or contact BOTI for a quote.

 

Recommended Prior Experience and Knowledge: AutoCAD Plant 3D Essentials Training Course

The course (AutoCAD Plant 3D Essentials Training Course) is designed for the following attendees:

  • Targeted at New users of the software.

For the AutoCAD Plant 3D Essentials Training Course it is advisable that you have the following experience/knowledge:

  • Proficiency in utilizing AutoCAD (preferably in the 3D modeling environment)
  • Instrument and process diagrams knowledge (although suggested – not required)
  • Process industry or piping industry basic knowledge (although suggested – not required)
  • Microsoft® Windows®

 

 

Book or Obtain Instant Quote

In addition to the related public courses, we offer the above course (Autocad Plant 3d Essential Training: Admin Classes (or Autocad Plant 3d Training South Africa, Johannesburg, Cape Town, Pretoria, Durban) across the country: Anytime, Anywhere. Click on the link to get an instant proposal or book your course NOW:

Book or Obtain Instant Quote
Or alternatively click on the button below to view our full Public Course Calendar of close to 100 events:

2018 Public Course Calendar 

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Tel:011-882-8853

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